Commentary

  • December 19, 2014

    “Changing Skyline: iPic didn’t come, so now what for the Boyd?” From Philadelphia, PA.

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    All anyone had to do was say the word multiplex and the Boyd Theatre’s fair-weather friends abandoned the grand dame of Philadelphia movie palaces as if the place was on fire. Demolition of the art deco auditorium was sanctioned by the Historical Commission in March, and within days, wrecking crews were on the scene, supposedly for the Florida chain iPic.

    Now we know it was all magical thinking.

    Neil Rodin, the developer who said he was bringing iPic to Philadelphia, never followed through on his much-ballyhooed plan to buy the Boyd from its longtime owner, Live Nation. Meanwhile, iPic has problems of its own and lost its financing for the project, according to a source involved with the company. In late October, Live Nation quietly sold the theater at 19th and Chestnut to Jim Pearlstein and Reed Slogoff of Pearl Properties for $4.5 million.

    Read the entire article at philly.com

  • December 11, 2014

    “Long-simmering rivalry keeps Bala Theatre screens dark” From Bala Cynwyd, PA.

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    In a twist that has Lower Merion on the edge of its seat, the historic Bala Theatre has been closed – not for lack of money or customers, but because of a bitter personal feud.

    The two men at the center of the controversy both say they love the 1926 movie house and want to see it succeed – but they loathe each other, and have come to an impasse over who is responsible for repairs and upgrades.

    The landlords “were hostile from the minute we took over,” said Gregory Wax, who bought the Bala Theatre lease in 2013.

    “I call him Wacko, even though I know what his name is,” said Isaak Sotolidis, who owns the theater, a neighboring pizza shop, and several other storefronts on the block…

    Read the entire article at philly.com.

  • September 24, 2014

    50 Years of Pop

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    In honor of it being 50 years since its second premiere engagement at Radio City Music Hall, Cinema Treasures is celebrating the Golden Anniversary of “Mary Poppins.” With an interview featuring film historians from around the world and the always detailed account of its presentation history, Michael Coate’s two-page feature at the Digital Bits is one any film fan won’t want to miss. Check it out now!

  • February 19, 2014

    Digital Bits cebebrates “Sweet Charity” at 45

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    Michael Coate has written another great piece over at the Digital Bits for the 45th Anniversary of “Sweet Charity.” He provides a detailed account of all its roadshow engagements as well as an interview with a number of film historians on that almost forgotten distribution format.

    Check out the whole story at the Digital Bits.

    (Thanks to Tinseltoes for providing the photo of the Cutler Majestic(nee Saxon) in Boston, host of the World Premiere of “Sweet Charity”.)

  • December 31, 2013

    Superman turns 35 and more

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    Here’s one more roundup of the meticulously researched anniversary pieces from Michael Coate over at The Digital Bits:

    SUPERMAN (35th anniversary)

    CLEOPATRA (50th anniversary)

    AMERICAN GRAFFITI (40th anniversary)

    DIE HARD (25th anniversary)

    JAMES BOND (50th anniversary)

    FUNNY GIRL (45th anniversary)

  • December 24, 2013

    Film Anniversaries celebrated at The Digital Bits

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    Longtime Cinema Treasures contributor, Michael Coate, has been writing some wonderful pieces for The Digital Bits lately that we thought would be of interest to readers. As 2013 winds down, here are some of the significant anniversaries from the past year.

    RETURN OF THE JEDI (30th anniversary)

    IT’S A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD (50th anniversary)

    THE ROBE / CINEMASCOPE (60th anniversary)

  • December 5, 2013

    Comments and Behavior On This Site

    To the CT Community, I feel compelled to post a notice about the recent run of behavior in the comments section. I’m not going to go on and on about it but those who frequent the site may be able to cite some of the offending examples. Instead, I’ll simply make this brief. One or both of these things will happen: 1) Violators of the user policy may be immediately suspended from the site. (No more pleasant warnings in advance.) 2) The ability to comment on theater pages may be suspended indefinitely. If you care about this site and about these theaters, please keep your comments on point and not about one another. We’ve been online for thirteen years and I’m deeply dismayed by what’s going on over the past two weeks. It ends today, one way or another.

  • August 6, 2013

    “American Graffiti” Anniversary article at The Digital Bits

    Longtime Cinema Treausres contributor Michael Coate, who most recently wrote about the Anniversary of “2001” has put together another thorough look back at a classic with his story on “American Graffiti” at the Digital Bits. Check out his list of engagements along with fun facts and review quotes in this conclusive piece on a moment in movie history 40 years ago.

  • July 2, 2013

    Scholars Need Your Feedback on ‘60s British Moviegoing

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    “Did you go to the cinema in 1960s Britain?” If so, historian Melvyn Stokes and his project team would like your help in filling out a questionnaire for “a major AHRC-funded research project which aims to shed light on the social and cultural history of cinema. To many writers, sixties films summed up the changes transforming British society, but the films themselves reveal nothing about how they were received and remembered. We want to find out how cinema-goers remember the films they saw. We are asking anyone who went to the cinema in 1960s Britain to share their memories with us by completing a short questionnaire.”

    To fill out the questionnaire, visit this page

    (Thanks to Ken Roe for the classic photo.)

  • July 1, 2013

    The Battle Over Texting Continues

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    David Edelstein at Vulture rails against texters and talkers in movie houses, while Jason Bailey at Flavorwire thinks we should all just get over it. No surprise that I think texters and talkers in movie houses are the scourge of the modern age, but what do you think?