Embassy 1,2,3 Theatre

707 Seventh Avenue,
New York, NY 10036

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Showing 251 - 275 of 1,059 comments

SethLewis
SethLewis on May 30, 2011 at 4:14 pm

I was living abroad when this was triplexed into the Mark 1,2,3…Was the first booking as a triplex the move over of Apocalypse Now in 1979 from the Ziegfeld. Wouldn’t that have been great and appropriate in the original DeMille.

I can testify to Walking Tall having played everywhere before NYC. My memory of it was at the Gateway in Ft. Lauderdale on a very long first run. The Cinerama Releasing Corporation ads (their product was mostly showcased at RKO’s – in Manhattan at the 86th St, 59th St and Cinerama) were the pokiest slimmest in memory…

Astyanax
Astyanax on May 30, 2011 at 2:35 pm

Is the interior now completely gutted?

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on May 30, 2011 at 2:26 pm

Guild did. It says it in the intro.

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on May 30, 2011 at 1:56 pm

i’m asking a question i asked several months ago and would appreciate it if my fellow posters have any additional info/thoughts on the matter. during Oct.1955 thru Dec.1972 seven large grand old movies were used as roadshow houses by the studios-Criterion, Loews State, RKO Palace, DeMille, Warner, Rivoli and the Loews Capitol. now the Palace was originally built as a stage theater so my question will pertain to the other six. the Criterion was in fairly decent shape after a redo by United Artists theaters before being gutted for the Toys R' Us. the Loews State which had been twinned in 1968 was in fairly decent shape before the building which housed it was torn down. the Warner which had been tri-plexed in 1967? was still in fairly decent shape before the building which housed it was torn down. this was also the case with the Rivoli which had been twinned and the Loews Capitol which wasn’t. so here’s my question- who the hell owned/operated/managed the Embassy1,2,3 before it closed for good? in contrast to the other five theaters just noted the Embassy 1,2,3 was in absolutely horrid shape. this was especially true not only of the 3 auditoriums but the men’s rooms on both the orchestra and mezzanine/balcony level. i can’t believe the theater hadn’t already closed because of building or health code violations.

techman707
techman707 on May 30, 2011 at 11:22 am

Al, Yes, the fire was not too long after “Walking Tall”. Your right about it being sub-run because I recall it being a used print. We usually got a new prints and a backup print. If you know when “That’s Entertainment” left the Ziegfeld, that was the night of the fire. It was supposed to be moved over to the DeMille the next day. The night before I had changed over all the gates and lenses to 70mm and the print of “TE” was supposed to be brought over in the next morning. When I came out of the subway that morning I saw there was nothing on the marquee and then the stagehand told me about the fire. Other than the smell of smoke, the booth and the projectors weren’t damaged at all. Most of the damage was in the second floor lobby.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on May 30, 2011 at 9:14 am

techman,

“Walking Tall” was playing subrun at the DeMille in August-September 1974 when the theatre disappears from NYT ads. Is this when it caught fire?

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on April 16, 2011 at 2:58 pm

Here is a shot I hadn’t seen before, which I found on someone’s flickr acount.

View link

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on April 1, 2011 at 10:53 am

Walter Reade bought the 1910 burlesque house in 1928 and rebuilt it into a movie theatre, which RKO operated. It opened in October 1930.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on April 1, 2011 at 10:29 am

IMDB notes that the movie “M” was released in the US on March 31, 1933, in New York City, despite being produced and released in Germany in 1931. A date of May 11 is given for its German premiere in ‘31.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on April 1, 2011 at 10:28 am

techman, the 1931 German film “M” did not open in the U.S. until 1933.

techman707
techman707 on April 1, 2011 at 9:41 am

Al-The only “M” I was aware of (besides the 1951 remake) was the 1931 version directed by Fritz Lang with Peter Lorre. Who was in the 1933 version of “M”?

Tinseltoes-Are you saying Walter the Reade Sr. had the Columbia Burlesque Theater built in 1910?

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on April 1, 2011 at 8:28 am

Walter Reade died in 1952 at age 68. The son died in 1973 on a ski trip at age 57.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on April 1, 2011 at 7:09 am

The Mayfair was built by pioneer exhibitor Walter Reade. Prior to opening, he leased it to RKO Theatres to insure quality bookings. RKO eventually had to drop out when it took over the management of the two new theatres in Rockefeller Center and also had to switch the Palace, which was just down the block from the Mayfair, from vaudeville to movies. Walter Reade took over the management of the Mayfair until 1935, when he leased it to Loew’s as a replacement for Loew’s New York. which was to be demolished along with the rest of the original Olympia complex. Loew’s New York had long been very successful as a subsequent-run house with two program changes per week, and Loew’s switched that policy to the Mayfair. During more than ten years as Loew’s Mayfair, that sub-run policy never varied. First-run bookings resumed when the Brandt circuit took over the Mayfair. During all that time, the theatre was owned by Walter Reade (and/or his estate; I’m not sure when he died). His son and namesake, Walter Reade, Jr., was responisble for taking back the management and re-naming the theatre the DeMille for positioning as a roadshow venue.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on March 31, 2011 at 9:05 pm

techman, the American “M” run didn’t occur until 1933.

The Mayfair became the DeMille in December 1959 with the Aromarama run of “Behind the Great Wall”.

techman707
techman707 on March 31, 2011 at 8:29 pm

“The Mayfair foreign phase was very short lived. Even "M” was dubbed into English by the third week and mainstream films were mostly the norm.

RKO had been the previous operator."

Al, I’m a little confused. Are you referring to the remake of “M” in 1951? Because the original German “M” was around 1931 and it was the RKO Mayfair at that time, so it couldn’t have been Walter Reade who had the theatre unless it was later.

BTW-At the top of this thread they say that the Mayfair became the DeMille in 1960 or “the early 1960’s”. The theatre was renamed the DeMille in 1959, a short time before Spartacus opened. There was a plaque with a bust of DeMille (just like the ones in Loews theatres of Marcus Loew) in the lobby as you went up the staircase to the mezzanine. It also had the actual day, but I just can’t remember the date it said.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on March 31, 2011 at 3:29 pm

The Mayfair foreign phase was very short lived. Even “M” was dubbed into English by the third week and mainstream films were mostly the norm.

RKO had been the previous operator.

techman707
techman707 on March 31, 2011 at 2:46 pm

“No longer affiliated with RKO Theatres, the Mayfair was now being booked and managed by its owner, Walter Reade, with a policy of "The Cinema of All Nations.”

Tinseltoes-What time frame are you referring to with the above statement? Loews was there before Walter Reade, who I worked for.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on March 31, 2011 at 1:38 pm

Seventy-eight years ago today, Fritz Lang’s “M,” even then considered a masterwork of world cinema, opened its American premiere engagement at the Mayfair Theatre. Starring Peter Lorre as a psychotic child killer, the stark B&W drama was shown with its original German dialogue and English sub-titles. No longer affiliated with RKO Theatres, the Mayfair was now being booked and managed by its owner, Walter Reade, with a policy of “The Cinema of All Nations.”

terrywade
terrywade on March 23, 2011 at 12:01 pm

Hollywood 90038 I tried to e mail you about the Times Sq Theatres. The one that starts with unisphere? Do you have a new e mail thanks Terry San Franciso CA

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on March 5, 2011 at 3:02 pm

Tinseltoes mentioned the one and only Jane Russell in his post of 2/9/2011… Sadly, we lost Ms Russell earlier this week on Monday the 28th, at the age of 89.

techman707
techman707 on March 5, 2011 at 12:23 pm

LOL- At some point in time EVERYTHING was in an SMPTE Journal. I have all my own journals from 1972 on. I also have most of the 1940’s & 50’s journals from Bill Nafash’s stuff. I donated most of the EXTENSIVE documentation I got from him to The Museum of the Moving Image in 1989.

RJT70mm
RJT70mm on March 5, 2011 at 6:58 am

REndres said:
“I’ve heard of the Paramount system of "TV” projection before, and there may even be documentation about it in Richardson’s “Bluebook of Projection”. I think the State-Lake Theatre in Chicago used the same system"
I used to have an SMPE Journal from the late forties with a picture of this installation at the Paramount. They had E7’s, Hall & Connelly HC10’s and WE TA7400 soundheads. I also have an issue of International Projectionist from the same era with an article about the installation at the Chicago theatre.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on February 9, 2011 at 10:01 am

Um, that should have been provided, not proved!

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on February 9, 2011 at 9:59 am

Nice image of the Underwater wrap-around ad, lifted from three posts above proved by hdtv267.

http://media.oldmovieexhibition.com/bnr.jpg

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on February 9, 2011 at 8:29 am

On this day in 1955, Howard Hughes' “Underwater!,” revealing Jane Russell’s charms for the first time in the anamorphic SuperScope process, opened its NYC premiere engagement at the Mayfair Theatre. Advertising for the RKO Technicolor release claimed that production took three years, at a cost of $3 million.