Astor Theatre

1531 Broadway,
New York, NY 10036

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Showing 251 - 275 of 341 comments

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on November 11, 2005 at 7:05 am

New Year’s Eve, 1936. Loew’s State had Gable & Crawford in “Love on the Run” (a move-over from the Capitol) and vaudeville. The Gaiety was presenting Minsky’s burlesque:
www.i8.photobucket.com/albums/a18/Warrengwhiz/lloyds.jpg

BoxOfficeBill
BoxOfficeBill on November 10, 2005 at 12:10 pm

Warren—
Splendid pix of the great old sign blazing with lights. The block-long newer version was a real disappointment with its harsh relected light. We can only wonder what colors the Ziegfeld and GWTW signs displayed, and what patterns of on-and-off blinking razzle-dazzle they sported.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on November 10, 2005 at 9:35 am

The big one! The apparent smear across the movie’s title is actually a semi-transparent banner that said “All Seats Reserved”:
www.i8.photobucket.com/albums/a18/Warrengwhiz/biggie.jpg

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on October 25, 2005 at 1:32 am

I didn’t know Staff Sgt. Barry Sadler (“The Ballad of the Green Berets”) ever made a movie. But there he is, in the cast of “Dayton’s Devils”.

RobertR
RobertR on October 24, 2005 at 2:47 pm

Not one of the Astor’s shining moments :)
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Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on October 18, 2005 at 5:44 am

“Gone With the Wind” ended its original reserved-seat engagement at the Astor in October, 1940, after a run of 44 weeks and a reported attendance of 2.5 million people (which seems to me somewhat exaggerated). The next day, the Astor re-linked with the Capitol for Charles Chaplin’s “The Great Dictator,” with the Astor again with reserved seats and the Capitol running “grind.” In those days, the Capitol presented movies only, but stage shows would resume in 1943 after an eight-year blackout.

RobertR
RobertR on October 18, 2005 at 2:28 am

March of 1955 “East of Eden"
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VincentParisi
VincentParisi on September 26, 2005 at 5:09 am

It would be nice as well to attach pictures of the Astor billboard with its various films. One of the all time greats of Times Square.
I would have loved to have seen the one for Queen Christina at night.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca on September 25, 2005 at 2:51 am

THESE THEATRE ADS appeared in a program booklet “Stadium Concerts Review” for Lewisohn Stadium, College of the City of New York, for July 29 to August 4, 1936. The concerts were by the Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra. The small ads tout what was playing at several New York movie theatres. One of them was the Astor, which was in its fifth month with The Great Ziegfeld.

spencerst
spencerst on August 29, 2005 at 5:55 pm

on the waterfront-1954
but look at the brodway plays
see all of them became movies
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spencerst
spencerst on August 29, 2005 at 5:30 pm

20,000 leagues under the sea-1954
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spencerst
spencerst on August 29, 2005 at 5:19 pm

the story of will rogers-1952
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spencerst
spencerst on August 29, 2005 at 4:59 pm

miracle of our lady of fatima=1952
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spencerst
spencerst on August 29, 2005 at 4:55 pm

miracle of our lady of fatima=1952
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Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on August 29, 2005 at 5:44 am

During the Christmas holidays of 1950, both the Astor and the adjacent Victoria had the NYC premiere engagements of long-awaited film versions of Broadway stage hits. The Astor had Universal’s “Harvey,” with James Stewart replacing stage star Frank Fay, and the Victoria presented Columbia’s “Born Yesterday,” with Judy Holliday re-creating her original role (and going on to winning an ‘Oscar’). On the stage, Holliday had been a last-minute replacement for Jean Arthur, who developed “cold feet” during the Boston tryout.

RobertR
RobertR on August 27, 2005 at 8:58 am

Yes Reade operated it for a time late in the game.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on August 26, 2005 at 8:35 pm

I see in the ad for the Carrol Baker picture that the Astor was listed as a Walter Reade theatre. I didn’t know Reade booked this house.

RobertR
RobertR on August 26, 2005 at 5:50 pm

By 1969 the Astor and Carroll Baker had seen better days
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Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on July 25, 2005 at 6:23 pm

That, plus the sign above the marquee that said the name of the picture.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on July 25, 2005 at 4:25 pm

Jerry, that is indeed a nice shot. That Saul Bass graphic on the Victoria marquee is so powerful, like all his graphics and logos. Apparently that’s all that was indeed for people to know that the movie was “The Man With the Golden Arm”.