Comments from David Wodeyla

Showing 251 - 275 of 325 comments

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about RKO Keith's Theatre on Mar 19, 2005 at 5:49 am

To Robert R, I couldn’t get the link to work, is there a different search criterea to get to this article?

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Two Screens for Sale on Mar 17, 2005 at 1:37 pm

I found an interesting use for an old screen, in a basement, where a tenant stapled it to the studs as a sort of “suspended” ceiling. It held the insulation up, and it’s flexibility made it easy to install.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Circle Cinemas on Mar 11, 2005 at 7:52 am

I thought the Circle opened in 1965. What film was listed as playing the theatre in 1960?

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Loews Cheri on Mar 9, 2005 at 7:12 pm

I’m not sure on when it happened, but when I worked there in the summer of 1968, I believe it was already a triple. I remember there was an elevator to go from the downstairs lobby to the theatre upstairs.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Loews Cheri on Mar 6, 2005 at 8:57 am

The Cheri was a single theatre when it opened, and later split, with the third auditorium up on street level later.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Capri Theater on Mar 6, 2005 at 8:53 am

According to a friend who worked there, when Sack took over the building near the Mass Pike entrance, now a hotel, he named the theatre The Capri. It played Bridge on the River Kwai, and Breakfast at Tiffaneys. The film La Dolce Vita played the Saxon.
When the Capri was sold, Sack took over an E,M.Loews building and named the theatre The Copley. This is now a Christian Science building. Both the Capri and Copley were on Huntington Ave, but not in the same location.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Abbey Cinema on Mar 3, 2005 at 7:00 am

I think the building was originally called the Psychedelic Supermarket, where I saw the Moody Blues in 1967 or ‘68. It was a large hall at the time.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Capri Theater on Mar 2, 2005 at 3:01 pm

Some have suggested that the Capri was also known at the Copley Theatre. I have the impression they’re two different buildings. The Copley was in a renovated hotel building, next door to The Stage Lounge on Stuart St. It was originally owned by E.M. Loew.
Where was the Capri?

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Seeking Name of Highlands, NJ Movie Theater on Feb 20, 2005 at 8:51 am

Was it called the Marine at 88 Bay Ave? I found it listed in the Film Daily, 1942 and 1957.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about "Picture House" Photography By Steven Rood on Feb 18, 2005 at 12:00 pm

This was a nice effort to sell photo-art, and thank you for showing us your products. The darkened and blurred images make the theatres appear closed, as though once colorful and bright, now in a blighted neighborhood, dark and abandoned. I enjoy looking at the marquee styles though, and wonder what the entrance areas look like today. Very mysterious, thank you for sharing your vision.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Grand Theater 3D Renderings on Feb 11, 2005 at 11:14 am

Great drawings! Has everyone seen the Sims games? I think someone should write a computer game called “SIM Cinema” so we can run a simulated theatre.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Apple Cinemas on Feb 10, 2005 at 1:06 pm

Is Boston Concessions Group previously known as Theatre Merchandising?

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Apple Cinemas on Feb 10, 2005 at 7:53 am

Fresh Pond was a tough theatre to manage, as was the strip mall. This was because of the low-income high rises behind. There was a constant problem with vandalism, and petty crime, and thus the reason the area isn’t very pleasant. Originally, the front had the two story picture windows, seen in many General Cinema and Showcase theatres built in the 1960’s. These windows had to be blocked up with concrete block. It was a “buck house” playing film subrun along with Stoneham, Saugus, and Waltham.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about White City Cinemas on Feb 9, 2005 at 2:33 pm

The White City Cinema opened in 1964 with Mary Poppins. Sound of Music played for 6 six months. The original single screen was split sometime in the 1970’s, and a third auditorium was made in what was originally a balcony, in 1985 following renovation from a fire. The Theatre closed the final Sunday in March, 2001. (thanks to a Worcester Telegram article by Virginia Lucier for the information)

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Cinema Shoppers World on Feb 9, 2005 at 11:47 am

There was a relationship, but I know of only one other situation. The Natick Drive In was a partnership. Redstone owned the land, and Smith Management (General Cinema) built the theatre. The boxoffice revenue was deposited under a separate unit number from concession, unlike nearly all other General Cinemas. I believe concession revenue went to Redstone. Advance newspaper accounts on the building of the Natick Drive In indicate a riff between the town and Redstone, and Redstone theoretically pulled out. At least publically.
The other location where there were two separate unit numbers, was Framingham with Boxoffice deposited under unit #530, and concession #850. I understood the concession revenue went into a private account.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Cinema Shoppers World on Feb 9, 2005 at 10:16 am

The “new screen” that was mentioned in the article, was the larger one installed for Cinemascope. I think it was 1954.
I don’t know the business arrangement, but I’d guess that Al Capp and Lee Falk rented the theatre for the summers, from Shoppers World, since General Cinema also leased the building. (one of the differences between Redstone and GCC was that Redstone bought land and built, and GCC let the shopping center build, and they leased the building.) Of course, we now know who had the smarter idea, but back then, the land wasn’t as valuable. I was told that Phil Smith was a genius because he didn’t believe in investing in land the way his neigbor did. Since the lease agreements of the late ‘80s and '90 contributed to the bankruptcy of the chain, I guess he wasn’t as smart as everyone once thought.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Paris Cinema on Feb 7, 2005 at 1:07 pm

I think it was a Sack theatre in 1967 when I saw “The Graduate” there.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Starting an Indie Cinema in Omaha on Feb 3, 2005 at 1:27 pm

First, your friend should read the messages on this site under the category of “Theatres in Need.” Next got to this link for lots more information. http://www.cinematour.com/article.php?id=3 Jim Rankin gives all the links you’ll need.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Memories Of Newsreel Theaters? on Jan 24, 2005 at 9:46 am

I imagine the Historical Society is a wealth of information, and it would be a great place to visit frequently, if one were in Chicago. For those of us who will never travel so far, we can only imagine. It reminds me of the Ackermansion of Famous Monsters of Filmland when I was a kid reading the magazine and wishing someday to visit Forry.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Gorman Theatre on Jan 20, 2005 at 4:35 am

Sorry, the Film Daily may have a spelling error. The name of the town is Framingham. The link to the web page is http://natickmass.info/Gorman.htm

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Landmark Kendall Square Cinema on Jan 14, 2005 at 11:32 am

As nearly all the Landmark Theatres I’ve seen pictures of, this one is stylish, and is run like theatres were in the “old days” with an emphasis on good customer service. The projectionist is a perfectionist, and the theatre is clean and well maintained. You’d expect being in a city that traffic would be a hassle, and parking would too. However, the Kendall has a large parking garage, the the roads leading there from Memorial Drive are no problem. It’s located not only in an area with lots of offices, but lots of homes too, all a shorter walk than Kendall Square. In my opinion, Landmark knows how to pick good locations, and make moviegoing a pleasure.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Circle Cinemas on Jan 13, 2005 at 9:55 am

Ron, the Green Line Chestnut Hill stop is about a 5 minute walk from Chestnut Hill Cinema. (past the Post Office, and to the right through the parking lot past Star Market. Lots of people use public transportation in the Newton Brookline area, and many who used to travel the green line from Fenway to Cleveland Circle and one stop up, Chestnut Hill, now can walk to the AMC Fenway Theatre. Of course the suburban Newton folks will continue to patronize Chestnut Hill, but the competition added by the Fenway Theatre, offered one more alternative for those who hated the lack of parking at Cleveland Circle, as well as the 4 tiny screens in the back. Those are the worst auditoriums anyone can imagine for watching a film.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about Circle Cinemas on Jan 13, 2005 at 6:07 am

Chestnut Hill and the Fenway AMC are right on the same green line as the Circle. I think the Fenway hurt the Circle’s business.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about AMC Braintree 10 on Jan 11, 2005 at 11:59 am

With Six You Get Eggroll premiered at 3 General Cinemas on the same day, Braintree, Peabody, and Framingham, with a helicopter taking Barbara Hershey, et al to each location. When they arrived in the parking lot at Framingham, there was a High School band playing to greet them. Probably the same kind of local things happened at each location. There was even a Boston Record American with an extra front page wrap announcing the event, handed out at each theatre.

I don’t know why the Boston suburbs were chosen for the event.

David Wodeyla
David Wodeyla commented about AMC Braintree 10 on Jan 11, 2005 at 9:32 am

Projection was handled by George Follis and John Grebauski, for most of the years, that the South Shore Plaza Cinema was in operation. Mr Follis was the business agent for the local, and ran a 16mm film rental business in Quincy on the side. Both men worked seven days a week, rather than allow a relief man in their booth.
The floor staffs generally were long tenured, and younger brothers and sisters followed in their siblings footsteps in working the Cinema. It was the only theatre in the circuit which had a Matron on the payroll, from 1966 until she retired in the late 1980’s. Her name was Miriam.