Comments from Tinseltoes

Showing 3,376 - 3,400 of 4,125 comments

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Prospect Theatre on Apr 5, 2011 at 1:32 pm

Here’s a link to a photo taken in front of Loew’s Valencia during the Al Jolson tour: View link

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Columbia Theatre on Apr 5, 2011 at 8:14 am

More than a century ago, on Sunday, April 5, 1908, the Columbia was advertised in The New York Times as “The Home of Melodrama,” with the stage play “Sweet Molly O,” starring Dolly Kemper, due to open the next day for a six-day run with matinee and evening performances. On Sundays only, the Columbia presented “Shepard’s Famous Moving Pictures” and “High Class Vaudeville.”

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Dewey Theatre on Apr 5, 2011 at 7:56 am

More than a century ago, on Sunday, April 5th, 1908, the Dewey Theatre was advertised in The New York Times with eight acts of vaudeville, topped by the Watermelon Trust and Ben Welch, and assorted moving pictures projected via “The Deweyscope.” The matinee started at 2:15pm, and the evening performance at 8:15pm. Tickets were priced at 25 and 50 cents. This was the last day of the engagement. Opening the next day for a week’s run, was a similar program, with the Kentucky Belles heading the vaudeville acts.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Hollywood Theatre on Apr 5, 2011 at 6:21 am

Sixty-four years ago today, WB’s “The Two Mrs. Carrolls,” a B&W melodrama starring Humphrey Bogart, Barbara Stanwyck, and Alexis Smith, opened its world premiere engagement at the Hollywood Theatre. The eagerly-awaited film was based on a hit play that ran for two years on Broadway. To handle the expected crowds, the Hollywood’s last screening that day started past midnight at 1:15am.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Albany Theatre on Apr 4, 2011 at 1:38 pm

One of the stars of the Albany’s opening film was Ronald Colman (not Coleman).

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Movieland on Apr 4, 2011 at 12:55 pm

Fifty-eight years ago today, Republic’s The Lady Wants Mink" opened its NYC premiere engagement as the Holiday Theatre’s Easter attraction. Filmed in Republic’s own TruColor process, the romantic comedy starred Ruth Hussey, Dennis O'Keefe, Eve Arden, and William Demarest. Advertising claims like “How a Mink Can Make a Monkey Out of a Man!” failed to attract crowds. After its Holiday Theatre run, the film landed on the Loew’s circuit as supporting feature to Paramount’s Technicolored “Shane.”

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Roxy Theatre on Apr 4, 2011 at 9:22 am

Fifty-nine years ago today, the Roxy opened its 1952 Easter Holiday Show with 20th-Fox’s Jane Froman biopic. the Technicolored “With A Song In My Heart,” on screen. Susan Hayward, with her singing voice dubbed by Froman, played the leading role, co-starred with Rory Calhoun, David Wayne, and Thelma Ritter. The Roxy’s stage show featured TV singer Bill Hayes, ballerina Nanci Crompton, ventriloquist Clifford Guest, and the singularly named Divena in an underwater ballet. The Gae Foster Roxyettes, dressed as Easter bunnies, did their famous routine of balancing on huge rubber balls…This year, the Roxy had strong musical competition from RCMH, which had MGM’s “Singin' in the Rain” for the screen portion of its Easter show.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Boulevard Theatre on Apr 4, 2011 at 8:34 am

A couple of recent photos of the spruced-up facade of the Boulevard Theatre can be seen at the very end of this new article about Westchester Avenue: View link

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Capitol Theatre on Apr 3, 2011 at 9:42 am

Seventy years ago today, MGM’s “The Bad Man,” with Wallace Beery as a fictional spin-off of the character he portrayed in “Viva Villa,” opened its NYC premiere engagement at the Capitol Theatre. The B&W western’s supporting cast was topped by Lionel Barrymore, Laraine Day, and a future President of the USA (borrowed from Warner Bros.). Still being managed by Major Edward Bowes but now in a “screen only” period, the Capitol supported “The Bad Man” with a compilation of all major newsreels, plus an MGM Technicolor cartoon and the latest episodes of MGM’s “Pete Smith Specialty” and “Crime Does Not Pay” series.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Bon Ton Theater on Apr 3, 2011 at 9:16 am

Could this be the Bon Ton Theatre? It definitely is NOT the Broadway Theatre, and it doesn’t seem to fit the descriptions of other Newburgh theatres listed at Cinema Treasures: View link

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Avon 9th Street Theatre on Apr 3, 2011 at 9:08 am

Sorry, “Blessed,” but I don’t know the booking for that date. But you might be able to find it in the Brooklyn Eagle issue of 12/7/41, which some public libraries have on microfilm. However, many small, sub-run theatres didn’t advertise in newspapers because it was unnecessary and/or too expensive. Most of their patronage came from people in the neighborhood.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Roxy Theatre on Apr 3, 2011 at 8:41 am

Seventy years ago today, the Roxy Theatre made history with the opening of the world premiere engagement of UA’s “Pot O'Gold,” the first movie ever produced by the son of an incumbent President of the United States. James Roosevelt’s B&W romantic comedy starred James Stewart and Paulette Goddard, with a plot spun around the popular radio program of the same title. That show’s Horace Heidt and his band, the Musical Knights, also appeared in the movie. The Roxy’s stage bill was topped by harmonica virtuoso Larry Adler, with support from Al Bernie, Ann DuPont, Weldon Barr, the Gae Foster Girls, the 12 Esquires, and the Roxy Orchestra.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Loew's Victoria Theatre on Apr 3, 2011 at 8:08 am

Josephine Baker gave only a single performance at the Victoria Theatre in 1973 as a benefit for the Harlem division of the Police Athletic League (PAL)…Loew’s Victoria had a limited connection with vaudeville due to intense competition from other theatres in the area. Further details can be found here: http://www.villageviews.org/victoria.pdf

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Avon 9th Street Theatre on Apr 2, 2011 at 1:15 pm

12/7/41 was a Sunday, which is probably why you were at the movies when you heard the news. No school!

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about RKO Franklin Theatre on Apr 1, 2011 at 10:27 am

On this night only in 1947, the RKO Franklin presented vaudeville in addition to its current screen program of 20th-Fox’s “Boomerang” and Republic’s “Rendezvous with Annie.” Topping the Franklin’s stage bill was the great comedian Mantan Moreland, best known for his portrayal of chauffeur Birmingham Brown in Monogram’s “Charlie Chan” series.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Embassy 1,2,3 Theatre on Apr 1, 2011 at 7:09 am

The Mayfair was built by pioneer exhibitor Walter Reade. Prior to opening, he leased it to RKO Theatres to insure quality bookings. RKO eventually had to drop out when it took over the management of the two new theatres in Rockefeller Center and also had to switch the Palace, which was just down the block from the Mayfair, from vaudeville to movies. Walter Reade took over the management of the Mayfair until 1935, when he leased it to Loew’s as a replacement for Loew’s New York. which was to be demolished along with the rest of the original Olympia complex. Loew’s New York had long been very successful as a subsequent-run house with two program changes per week, and Loew’s switched that policy to the Mayfair. During more than ten years as Loew’s Mayfair, that sub-run policy never varied. First-run bookings resumed when the Brandt circuit took over the Mayfair. During all that time, the theatre was owned by Walter Reade (and/or his estate; I’m not sure when he died). His son and namesake, Walter Reade, Jr., was responisble for taking back the management and re-naming the theatre the DeMille for positioning as a roadshow venue.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Radio City Music Hall on Apr 1, 2011 at 6:24 am

Sorry, Justin! Chalk it up to a typing error. I do know how to spell the word. Did you know that they’re called daisies because their scent can put you in a daze? Nelson Rockefeller would never permit them backstage at RCMH when his Rockettes were performing.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Embassy 1,2,3 Theatre on Mar 31, 2011 at 1:38 pm

Seventy-eight years ago today, Fritz Lang’s “M,” even then considered a masterwork of world cinema, opened its American premiere engagement at the Mayfair Theatre. Starring Peter Lorre as a psychotic child killer, the stark B&W drama was shown with its original German dialogue and English sub-titles. No longer affiliated with RKO Theatres, the Mayfair was now being booked and managed by its owner, Walter Reade, with a policy of “The Cinema of All Nations.”

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Radio City Music Hall on Mar 31, 2011 at 8:42 am

Justin, I was only kidding. None of your claims about Nelson Rockefeller and RCMH are true…No 3-D features ever played at RCMH. In 1953, MGM’s “Kiss Me Kate” was considered, but shown “flat” instead due to technical problems related to projection and the distribution of glasses.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Radio City Music Hall on Mar 30, 2011 at 1:54 pm

Justin, you constantly amaze me with your knowledge. I never knew that Nelson Rockefeller ran Radio City Music Hall, that the Rockettes were his, and that he was responsible for their becoming New York icons. Thanks for sharing.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Capitol Theatre on Mar 30, 2011 at 9:22 am

Fifty years ago today, Paramount’s eagerly-awaited “One-Eyed Jacks,” which starred Marlon Brando and also marked his debut as a director, opened its NYC premiere engagement at Loew’s Capitol. Photographed in VistaVision and Technicolor, the epic western was presented at the Capitol as a semi-road show. Performances were continuous, and regular prices prevailed, but tickets could be purchased in advance for up to seven days. Advance tickets guaranteed a seat, but not a specific location. The advance tickets could be purchased not only at the Capitol, but also at all Loew’s circuit theatres in the Greater New York area. Tickets for current performances were sold only at the Capitol.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Roxy Theatre on Mar 29, 2011 at 7:41 am

Today marks the 51st anniversary of one of the most tragic events in movie palace history— the closure of the Roxy Theatre, which was quickly demolished that summer and replaced by an office building. The final movie was 20th-Fox’s British-made “The Wind Cannot Read.” Stage shows had been eliminated earlier in the year. No organized efforts were made to save the Roxy, which shuttered forever less than three weeks after the 33rd anniversary of its 1927 opening.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Radio City Music Hall on Mar 27, 2011 at 8:21 am

Fifty-nine years ago today, MGM’s “Singin' in the Rain” opened its world premiere engagement at RCMH as part of the 1952 Easter Holiday Show. Starring Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, and Debbie Reynolds, the Technicolor musical is now considered a classic of the genre. On the Music Hall’s stage, the “Glory of Easter” pageant was followed by “Spring Song,” which concluded with a spectacular fashion show displayng the latest creations of famous designers.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Loew's Metropolitan Theatre on Mar 27, 2011 at 8:03 am

Jean Harlow played a full week at Loew’s Metropolitan as part of the vaudeville bill. She also did a full week before or after that at Loew’s Paradise in the Bronx, but I doubt if she created pandemonium at either theatre. She was still a star on the rise, and had just signed a long-term contract at MGM, which sent her on the road to increase her popularity.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Ford Center for the Performing Arts Oriental Theatre on Mar 26, 2011 at 1:16 pm

On this day in 1943, the Oriental Theatre opened an exclusive one-week engagement of Billy Rose’s traveling road show, “Diamond Horeshoe Revue,” featuring showgirls and performers from the producer’s famous New York City nightclub. Staged by John Murray Anderson, the revue claimed 12 spectacular scenes and a cast of 50, including some of “America’s Most Beautiful Girls” and veteran entertainers like Charles King, Tess (“Aunt Jemima”) Gardella, and Walter Wahl. On screen, the Oriental offered the Chicago premiere of Republic’s B&W spy thriller, “The Purple V,” with John Archer and Mary McLeod.