Comments from Tinseltoes

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Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Radio City Music Hall on Mar 26, 2011 at 7:05 am

Fifty-eight years ago today, RCMH opened its 1953 Easter Holiday Show with WB’s “By the Light of the Silvery Moon” on screen. The nostalgic Technicolor musical starred Doris Day and Gordon MacRae, with David Butler as director. On stage, the sacred pageant “Glory of Easter” was followed by “Rainbow,” which featured the Rockettes as Easter bonbons and the return of “Dancing Waters” for a spectacular number by the Corps de Ballet. RCMH had strong Easter competition that year from its giant neighbor, the Roxy, which had opened the previous day with Ethel Merman in 20th-Fox’s Technicolor version of the Broadway smash, “Call Me Madam,” plus an ice-skating revue honoring the music of Irving Berlin.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about RKO Keith's Theatre on Mar 25, 2011 at 1:46 pm

Queens Borough Preident Helen Marshall has given her blessings to the RKO Keith’s Flushing re-development plan: View link

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Tinseltoes commented about Roxy Theatre on Mar 25, 2011 at 8:54 am

Fifty-eight years ago today, the Roxy opened its 1953 Easter Show with a double serving of the great songwriter Irving Berlin. On screen in its world premiere engagement was 20th-Fox’s Technicolor version of Berlin’s “Call Me Madam,” with Ethel Merman in the role she created in the smash hit Broadway musical. On its Ice-Colorama Radiant Ice Rink, the Roxy presented “Melody Time,” a tribute by the resident Skating Blades & Belles to Irving Berlin’s many evergreens, including “Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” “Always,” “Easter Parade,” “Blue Skies,” “A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody,” “White Christmas,” and “There’s No Business Like Show Business.”

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Orpheum Theatre on Mar 23, 2011 at 10:50 am

This must have been one of Marcus Loew’s earliest theatres. I found an ad for Loew’s Orpheum in the Boston Daily Globe of April 28th, 1911, which is four years prior to the 1915 closure for re-building reported in some of the postings above. The attraction at Loew’s Orpheum on 4/28/1911, which is nearly a century ago, was “All Star Vaudeville,” with continuous performances from 9:00am to 11:00pm (persumably starting time for the last show). Tickets were 10 cents and 15 cents in the mornings, and 10-15-25 cents for the rest of the day and night.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Orpheum Theatre on Mar 23, 2011 at 9:19 am

Seventy-two years ago today, John Ford’s B&W “Stagecoach,” a now classic western that elevated John Wayne to major stardom, opened its Boston premiere engagement at the paired Loew’s State and Orpheum. Columbia’s B&W thriller, “Whispering Enemies,” with Jack Holt and Dolores Costello, was the supporting feature…On that same day, M&P’s paired Paramount and Fenway opened with WB’s “Blackwell’s Island” and 20th-Fox’s “The Arizona Wildcat,” while M&P’s individually booked Metropolitan unveiled Paramount’s “Midnight,” supported by the same studio’s “King of Chinatown.”

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Capitol Theatre on Mar 23, 2011 at 8:36 am

On this day in 1944, MGM’s “The Heavenly Body,” a B&W comedy that lived up to its title by starring voluptuous Hedy Lamarr opposite William Powell, opened its NYC premiere engagement at the Capitol Theatre. Topping the Capitol’s stage show was the beloved “Schnozzola,” Jimmy Durante, returning for the first time since the theatre resumed its “live” presentations. Also on the bill were young Hollywood star Bonita Granville, dancers Mary Raye and Naldi, and Sonny Dunham & His Orchestra.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Loew's Metropolitan Theatre on Mar 23, 2011 at 7:38 am

Sixty-seven years ago today, MGM’s “Whistling in Brooklyn,” a B&W comedy with Red Skelton and the entire Brooklyn Dodgers baseball team, opened its NYC premiere engagement at Loew’s Metropolitan, day-and-date with Loew’s State in midtown Manhattan. Loew’s Met provided a second “A” feature in support—UA’s B&W “Jack London,” with Michael O'Shea and Susan Hayward. Loew’s State added its customary vaudeville bill, this one topped by Will Osborne & His Hollywood Band, who came direct from a smash engagement only five blocks away at the Capitol Theatre.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Capitol Theatre on Mar 22, 2011 at 6:38 am

Seventy-six years ago today, MGM’s “Naughty Marietta,” the B&W musical that launched the legendary teaming of Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy, opened its NYC premiere engagement at the Capitol Theatre, simultaneous with Loew’s Metropolitan in downtown Brooklyn. Helene Denizon, billed as “America’s Own Pavlowa,” topped the Capitol’s stage show, which also featured Florence & Alvarez, Bonner & Newman, and 22 Danny Dare Girls. The stage presentation at Loew’s Met included Freddie Martin & His Orchestra, Frances Arms, and the 3 Fonzals.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Paramount Theatre on Mar 19, 2011 at 8:10 am

Seventy years ago today, Paramount’s B&W musical “Las Vegas Nights,” which was a showcase for “That Sentimental Gentleman” Tommy Dorsey and his swing orchestra, opened its NYC premiere engagement at the Paramount Theatre. The film included a rendition of “Dolores” by a skinny crooner known as Frank Sinatra, but his name wasn’t metioned in the advertising, which did credit actors Bert Wheeler, Constance Moore, Phil Regan, Betty Brewer, Lillian Cornell, and even comedian Red Donahue and his mule “Uno.” The Paramount’s stage show was topped by singer Allan Jones, comedians Wally Brown & Annette Ames, Ina Ray Huton & Her Orchestra, the Lane Brothers, and, the “Extra Added Attraction” of the Andrews Sisters. Within a year, Sinatra would start performing on the Paramount’s stage and quickly become forever linked to the theatre’s history.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Movieland on Mar 18, 2011 at 10:38 am

Tomorrow (3/19) will mark the 52nd anniversary of the opening of the NYC premiere engagement of Walt Disney’s “The Shaggy Dog,” a B&W comedy starring Fred MacMurray and Jean Hagen, at the Odeon Theatre on Broadway and the Trans-Lux 52nd Street on the East Side. The Easter holiday booking also found Walt Disney represented on Broadway with the ongoing engagement of his Technicolor animated feature “Sleeping Beauty” at the Criterion Thearre, where it was being shown in Technirama 70 with stereophonic sound.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Roxy Theatre on Mar 18, 2011 at 7:52 am

On this day in 1959, the Roxy opened what proved to be its final Easter holiday package, with Howard Hawks' Technicolor western, “Rio Bravo,” on screen. John Wayne, Dean Martin, and Ricky Nelson starred in the Warner Brothers release, with Angie Dickinson, Walter Brennan, Ward Bond, and John Russell featured. On its truncated stage, the Roxy presented “Spring Fever,” starring Dorothy Keller, with support from Earl Hall, the Roxy Singers & Dancers Moderne, and the Roxy Orchestra under conductor Robert Boucher. That year, the Roxy’s competition from Radio City Music Hall consisted of MGM’s “Green Mansions,” with Audrey Hepburn and Anthony Perkins, and a two-part stage revue including the sacred “Glory of Easter” and the secular “Spring Parade.”

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Acme Theatre on Mar 16, 2011 at 1:24 pm

Sorry! The year of the ad was 1933, not 1932. The movie was originally released in Germany in 1929 as “Frau im Mond” (“Woman in the Moon”).

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Acme Theatre on Mar 16, 2011 at 1:01 pm

On this day in 1932, the Acme Theatre had a small ad in The New York Times for its current engagement of Fritz Lang’s German-made “By Rocket to the Moon,” described as even more fantastic and futuristic than the director’s “Metropolis.” All seats were 15 cents from 9:00am opening until 1:00pm on weekdays. Midnight performances were held on Saturdays.

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Tinseltoes commented about Roxy Theatre on Mar 14, 2011 at 8:55 am

Fifty-nine years ago today, 20th-Fox’s B&W “Deadline, U.S.A.,” writer-director Richard Brooks' gritty thriller about the newspaper world starring Humphrey Bogart, Ethel Barrymore, and Kim Hunter, opened its NYC premiere engagement at the Roxy Theatre. Hollywood singing-and-dancing star Gloria DeHaven topped the stage show, with support from the Norma Miller Dancers, juggler Veronica Martell, the comedy team of Noonan & Marshall, and the resident Gae Foster Roxyettes, H.L. Spitalny Singers, and Roxy Orchestra.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Loew's Melba Theatre on Mar 14, 2011 at 8:18 am

On this night only in 1952, Loew’s Melba presented eight acts of “Vodvil,” with the popular Pat. Rooney, Jr. as headliner. Also on the program were Paramount’s Technicolor “When Worlds Collide” and Paramount’s B&W “Submarine Command,” both in the third day of a week’s engagement.

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Tinseltoes commented about Roxy Theatre on Mar 13, 2011 at 1:19 pm

Here’s a link to 1938 newsreel footage showing the resident Gae Foster Girls rehearsing outdoors on the Roxy Theatre’s roof: View link

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Radio City Music Hall on Mar 13, 2011 at 10:22 am

Seventy years ago today, UA’s “Cheers For Miss Bishop,” a nostalgic B&W drama with Martha Scott as a spinster school teacher who dedicated her life to helping others, opened its NYC premiere engagement at the Music Hall. Russell Markert’s stage revue, “Yesterday,” harmonized with the movie’s period settings and had puppeteer Bil Baird & Company as the novelty act. Also on the program was Walt Disney’s latest RKO Technicolor cartoon, “Goofy’s Glider.”

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Loew's Woodside Theatre on Mar 12, 2011 at 1:02 pm

Fifty-nine years ago today, Loew’s Woodside opened its final booking— a week’s engagement of MGM’s B&W “Lone Star,” starring Clark Gable and Ava Gardner, and MGM’s B&W “Calling Bulldog Drummond,” with Walter Pidgeon and Margaret Leighton. The Woodside’s closing would leave Loew’s with five theatres in Queens— the Valencia, Triboro, Hillside, Prospect, and Willard. Those last three were also due to be dropped, but would continue to operate under new managements. The Woodside had already been sold to St. Sebastian’s Church.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Capitol Theatre on Mar 12, 2011 at 6:54 am

Thomas Lamb’s Hollywood Theatre, just across the street from the Capitol, still exists (in marvelous condition close to the original) as the Times Square Church. You can visit the interior free whenever services are held.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Capitol Theatre on Mar 11, 2011 at 1:54 pm

Sixty-eight years ago today, the Capitol resumed the deluxe stage/screen policy that had been dropped in 1935 for single features. The opening film was MGM’s B&W Naval thriller, “Stand By For Action,” starring Robert Taylor, Charles Laughton, and Brian Donlevy. Bob Crosby and his Danceable Dixieland Orchestra topped the stage bill, which also included Borrah Minevitch’s Original Harmonica Rascals with Johnny Puleo, dancers Mary Raye and Naldi, and radio’s “Hit Parade” singer Joan Edwards.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Brooklyn Paramount Theatre on Mar 11, 2011 at 1:28 pm

Will there be any discussion about the future of the Brooklyn Paramount (if it has one)? Will it be restored to use as a theatre or performing arts center, or converted to offices or classrooms?

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Radio City Music Hall on Mar 11, 2011 at 7:49 am

On this day in 1948, RCMH opened its annual Easter package, with Geroge Stevens' B&W “I Remember Mama,” starring Irene Dunne, on screen. The two-part stage revue opened with the religious “Glory of Easter,” followed by “Silver Lining,” a tribute to “the matchless magic of Spring in town and country.”

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Roxy Theatre on Mar 11, 2011 at 6:57 am

Eighty-four years ago tonight, the Roxy Theatre had its grand opening with the Gloria Swanson starrer, “The Love of Sunya,” on screen, and a spectacular stage show designed by the theatre’s founder and namesake. Tragically, the Roxy survived for only 33 years (most with a stage/film policy), and has been missing from the New York scene for just over half a century. What a loss!

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Tinseltoes commented about Radio City Music Hall on Mar 10, 2011 at 8:18 am

Sixty-two years ago today, MGM’s Technicolor version of “Little Women,” with June Allyson, Elizabeth Taylor, Margaret O'Brien, and Janet Leigh topping the cast, opened its world premiere engagement at RCMH, supported by Russell Markert’s “Curtain Time” stage revue. RKO’s earlier B&W version of “Little Women,” with Katharine Hepburn, had also opened (with stage show) at RCMH in 1933.

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Tinseltoes commented about RKO Keith's Theatre on Mar 9, 2011 at 7:33 am

The Arnazes purchased only the RKO studio lot, not the RKO Corporation or RKO Theatres (which by that time had been “split” from the parent). The studio, on Gower Street in central Hollywood adjacent to Paramount’s, was re-named Desilu. The studio was later combined with Paramount’s when Paramount purchased the entire Desilu empire to strengthen its position in TV production.