Comments from ERD

Showing 326 - 350 of 372 comments

ERD
ERD commented about Loew's 46th Street Theatre on Aug 1, 2004 at 10:48 am

The picture in the Brooklyn Public Library link shows the Garden Theatre-
which was built before Loew’s 46th Street. It stood next to it, across the street. (See Garden theatre on this web site.)

ERD
ERD commented about Loew's 46th Street Theatre on Aug 1, 2004 at 10:46 am

The picture in the Brooklyn Public Library link shows the Garden Theatre-
which was built before Loew’s 46th Street. It stood next top it, across the street. (See Garden theatre on this web site.)

ERD
ERD commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jul 22, 2004 at 9:44 pm

I remember a little program light that was built into the back of the seat in front of me. I think these lights were removed by the 1960’s.

ERD
ERD commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jul 22, 2004 at 9:36 pm

Once in a whle, a star of the movie would also appear as part of the stage show. In December of 1936, musical child star Bobby Breen appeared in the movie “RAINBOW ON THE RIVER” and was featured in the stage show.

ERD
ERD commented about Loew's State Theatre on Jul 22, 2004 at 1:01 pm

I remember seeing some movies and stage shows at Loew’s State when I was very young. The theatre was very handsome and comfortable.

ERD
ERD commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jul 13, 2004 at 10:54 pm

One should not forget to mention Dick Leibert, one of the original organists at Radio City Music Hall. He played there for 40 years. Mr. Leibert also recorded many albums, many on the RCMH organ, for RCA. What a superb musician.

ERD
ERD commented about Palace Theatre on Jun 24, 2004 at 11:15 pm

As I child, I remember going to the Palace and seeing movies with the 8 act vaudeville shows. Later on I saw many musicals at this theatre. I also recall sitting in the top balcony-which like many other theatres of that era was known as the “nose bleed” section. What a difference experience as compared to sitting the in the orchestra! How fortunate a way was found to save this theatre- even though the original facade was destroyed.

ERD
ERD commented about Hollywood Theatre on Jun 24, 2004 at 10:51 pm

This beautiful theatre is the last movie palace still standing in the Broadway area. Hopefully, the building can eventaully be returned to presenting shows. A producer with creative vision could do so much with it.

ERD
ERD commented about Paramount Theatre on Jun 22, 2004 at 1:36 pm

To clarify, Mr. Crawford told me he specified certain ranks for the New York Paramount organ. However, that is all he did. He did not design the entire organ. Mr. Craford did design the Publix #1 Wurlitzer organ at the request of the Pulix theatre chain.

ERD
ERD commented about Paramount Theatre on Jun 21, 2004 at 1:28 pm

I met with Jessie Crawford when I was young. Among the things he spoke with me about was his contribution to the designing of the New York Paramount organ. Mr. Crawford’s contribution to the Paramount organ is also mentioned by Ben M. Hall in “Best Remaining Seats."
The Command recording, as I mentioned above, used the theatre organ-not the studio organ.

ERD
ERD commented about Fox Theatre on Jun 19, 2004 at 9:50 pm

The fact remains that none of the movie palaces survived as theatres. The buildings have been altered to serve other purposes. The Paramount auditorium is a gym- and the Metropolitan has become a church.

ERD
ERD commented about Fox Theatre on Jun 19, 2004 at 11:06 am

I remember admiring the beautiful interior of this grand theatre.
What a shame that not one of the movie palaces in that area survied.

ERD
ERD commented about Windsor Theater on Jun 13, 2004 at 11:26 am

The Windsor showed second and third run films. It was a small theatre with a plain interior.

ERD
ERD commented about Boro Park Theatre on May 15, 2004 at 8:03 pm

The Boro Park theatre' front enterance curved. It was on 51st street and New Utrecht Avenue Street. (west side of the el.)
The audiotrium & stage extended to 52nd street & 12th avenue.
“The French Connection” was filmed from the 62nd Street Station (location used in the movie) going up through Bensonhurst, thus the
Boro Park & 46th Street theatres were not in the film. Brandt’s never had any signs or notices indicating they owned the 46th street theatre in the 1960’s. I knew the manager when the theatre had many legendary performers appearing there in the late 60’s and early 70’s. During that period the theatre became known as the house of stars.

ERD
ERD commented about Boro Park Theatre on Apr 30, 2004 at 2:17 pm

The Dyker was the nearest RKO theatre to Loew’s Boro Park on the West side section of Brooklyn.

ERD
ERD commented about Boro Park Theatre on Apr 30, 2004 at 11:59 am

Clarification was needed. Because of the anti-trust law, The Boro Park Theatre was “upgraded” in the late 1940’s. The neighborhood was always as proud of the Boro Park theatre as Loew’s 46th Street.

ERD
ERD commented about Boro Park Theatre on Apr 29, 2004 at 8:40 pm

Loew’s had an arrangement with the RKO chain. The Boro Park showed the same films playing at RKO theatres. The Boro Park was never downgraded. This is coming from a primary source since this was one of my neighborhood theatres that I regularly attended from the 1940’s until its closing. It is my opinion that the theatre was equal to Loew’s 46th Street in looks. It was built in a differentr style- and so it becomes a matter of taste.

ERD
ERD commented about Boro Park Theatre on Apr 29, 2004 at 2:10 pm

Located on 52nd Street & New Utrecht avenue is an old building (now used as a catering hall) that, elder citzens of the area told me many years ago, was once the “first” Boro Park theatre. It was built sometime after the turn of the century.

ERD
ERD commented about Glove Theater on Apr 27, 2004 at 10:39 pm

Correction- It was Kasson Opera House not Kasson’s Opera House. It is
located at 26-38 North Main Street. A.J.Kasson, who built the theatre, was a prominent glove manufacturer of the 19th century.

ERD
ERD commented about Glove Theater on Apr 27, 2004 at 10:24 pm

The Glove theatre opened on October 9, 1914. The 800 seat theatre was built by Dr. David Cady & George Dartch. In 1920 the Schine brothers bought The Glove theatre outright and leased the next door Family Theatre, formely known as Kasson’s Opera House & Memorial Hall. (The theatre opened in 1880 and closed around 1930.) The Schines also owned & managed The Hippodrome theatre in Gloversville since 1916. A Wurlitzer organ was installed in The Hippodrome (1925) and The Glove (1927) The Schines would eventually have 150 theatres in 5 states. The Glove theatre was remodeled quite a few times throughout its history.

ERD
ERD commented about Brighton Theatre on Apr 13, 2004 at 3:40 pm

I remember the Brighton theatre had columns which effected the sightlines from certain seats.

ERD
ERD commented about Center Theatre on Apr 13, 2004 at 1:10 pm

The Grand Foyer of the the New Roxy was done in red and gold fabric wth mahogany walls. The 3,700 seat auditorium had 75 foot rich mahogany paneled high walls which supported a flat ceiling decorated with figures from Greek mysthology. Centered over the orchestra section was a 104,000-watt chandelier, 30 feet in diameter. Claimed as the largest of its kind, the fixture required its own fan cooling system. The theatre premeired on December 29,1932 (Two days after the Music Hall) with a stage show and the movie ANIMAL KINGDOOM starring Leslie Howard and Myrna Loy. After successful litigation by the owners of The Roxy Theatre on 7th Avenue & 50th street, the theatre was renamed the RKO Center in 1933 featuring less costly second-run double bill films. In 1934 the RKO was dropped from the Center’s name when it opened with its first legitimate production,THE GREAT WALTZ. When the show closed, it attempted showing films again. When that failed, it returned to presenting live shows until it became an NBC studio in 1950. The theatre was demolished four years later (1954).
we renamed The RKO Center in 1933. Less costly second-run double bill movies were featured. The RKO was dropped from its name in 1934 when it got ready for its first legitmate booking, THE GREAT WALTZ. The Center attempted showing movies after this show closed, but when that failed, it returned to presenting live shows until becoming an NBC studio in 1950. The theatre was demolished four years later (1954) In 1950 for four years, the theatre was then demolished.

ERD
ERD commented about Johnstown Movieplex 9 on Mar 31, 2004 at 2:51 pm

The manager is very accommodating to the patrons of this multiplex

ERD
ERD commented about Holiday Twin Theatres on Mar 31, 2004 at 2:42 pm

This building would make a nice dinner theatre.

ERD
ERD commented about Towne Theatre on Mar 31, 2004 at 12:45 pm

For many years Smalley’s remained the only theatre in Johnstown. It was built on the site of the old Grand theatre.