Comments from Tinseltoes

Showing 3,551 - 3,575 of 4,124 comments

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about AMC Loews Lincoln Square 13 with IMAX on Jan 3, 2011 at 12:48 pm

No, Justin, you’re wrong. It’s Century 21, not Forever 21:
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Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Kent Theatre on Jan 2, 2011 at 7:44 am

A recent view of the Kent Theatre as bargain store can found at the start of this new article about the Morrisania section of the Bronx:
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Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jan 1, 2011 at 10:09 am

On this New Year’s Day in 1941, RCMH provided six screenings of MGM’s “The Philadelphia Story,” the first starting at 9:05 in the morning and the last at 10:26pm. The stage show, “Pan-Americana,” gave five performances, the first at 10:57am and the last at 9:35pm.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Loew's 72nd Street Theatre on Dec 31, 2010 at 1:30 pm

Sorry, but my first sentence of today gave the name incorrectly and omitted “Street” (or “St.”). The number by itself implies that it was the 72nd Loew’s theatre, which I’m sure would be untrue…Would be great if the introductory photo could be changed to one that actually shows Loew’s 72nd Street in its prime, instead of the architectural zero that replaced it.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Loew's 72nd Street Theatre on Dec 31, 2010 at 9:34 am

Sadly, tonight marks the 50th anniversary of the closing of Loew’s 72nd Theatre, one of the most magnificent atmospherics ever built, which survived for not even 29 years. The final program, part of a Loew’s circuit run, was “The World of Suzie Wong” and short subjects, which moved the next day to the RKO 58th Street. Loew’s now had no theatres on the East Side between the Orpheum on 86th Street and the Commodore and Delancey below 14th Street.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Trans-Lux 85th Street Theatre on Dec 30, 2010 at 1:56 pm

This debuted as the Trans-Lux 85th St. Cinema Cafe on October 12th, 1960, when it shared the NYC premiere engagement of Stanley Kramer-UA’s prestigious “Inherit the Wind” with the midtown Astor Theatre. “Cafe” used the French spelling, with an accent mark over the final letter, which I don’t know how to type in here.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Boro Park Theatre on Dec 30, 2010 at 6:36 am

The 1968 photo still shows the marquee and entrance used by Loew’s. But the Loew’s name has been removed.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Starlite Drive-In on Dec 29, 2010 at 1:32 pm

Fifty years ago, on 12/30/60, the Starlite was advertised in the Chicago Tribune as “America’s Most Famous Drive-In Theatre,” but failed to specify why. For the New Year’s holiday weekend, it would be operating from dusk to dawn with four features, “North to Alaska,” “CinderFella,” “Carry On Sergeant,” and “I’m All Right, Jack,” plus 35 minutes of cartoons. The Starlite could stay open in winter thanks to “Really Warm Bernz-O-Matic In Car Heaters.”

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Tivoli Theatre on Dec 29, 2010 at 11:43 am

Fifty years ago tomorrow, on 12/30/60, the B&K Tivoli started a one-week engagement of the stage revue “Smart Affairs of 1961,” with a cast of 50 topped by jazz-blues singer Nancy Wilson, the instrumental group The Three Sounds, comedian Slappy White, and limbo dancer Roz Croney. On screen was the sub-run John Wayne epic, “North to Alaska.” Doors opened daily at 1:00pm, with last stage show starting at 10:30pm.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Loew's State Theatre on Dec 28, 2010 at 1:41 pm

During this holiday week in 1958, Loew’s State re-opened its stage with Alan Freed’s “Christmas Jubilee of Stars,” with 21 acts topped by “Cry” crooner Johnnie Ray. On screen was 20th-Fox’s “Villa!,” in CinemaScope and color starring Bran Keith and Cesar Romero, with Rodolfo Hoyos in the title role.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Radio City Music Hall on Dec 27, 2010 at 7:46 am

Only two days after Christmas, on 12/27/34, RCMH replaced its annual Christmas holiday show, which had included Shirley Temple in “Bright Eyes,” with an entirely different program. On screen was RKO’s “The Little Minister,” starring Katharine Hepburn, whose “Little Women” had been RCMH’s biggest hit so far. Leonidoff’s stage revue was entitled “Kaleidoscope.”

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Paramount Theatre on Dec 26, 2010 at 10:02 am

On this first day after Christmas in 1952, families heading to midtown Manhattan to see a movie combined with a stage show had five to choose from:
Paramount Theatre, Doris Day & Ray Bolger in the Technicolor “April in Paris,” with Sarah Vaughan, Illinois Jacquet & His Orchestra, and Stump & Stumpy on stage;
Capitol Theatre, Errol Flynn & Maureen O'Hara in the Technicolor “Against All Flags,” with Johnnie Ray, Ray Anthony & His Orchestra, Gary Morton, and Georgia Gibbs;
Roxy Theatre, Clifton Webb in the Technicolor “Stars and Stripes Forever,” and the first skating revue on the newly installed Ice Colorama Stage;
Radio City Music Hall, Esther Williams in the Technicolor “Million Dollar Mermaid.” with “The Nativity” and “Season’s Greetings” on stage;
RKO Palace, Boris Karloff in the B&W “The Black Castle,” and 8 Vaudevile Acts.
The Warner Theatre (ex-Strand) was temporarily closed for conversion to Cinerama.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Rialto Theatre on Dec 26, 2010 at 7:16 am

Today (12/26) marks the 75th anniversary of the grand opening of the New Rialto Theatre, which would specialize in “Pictures chosen to give you the ultimate in thrill entertainment.” The premiere attraction was legendary animal trapper Frank Buck in “Fang and Claw”, a B&W feature documentary produced by the Van Buren Corporation for RKO Radio release. Doors opened daily at 9am, with last complete show at midnight.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Capitol Theatre on Dec 25, 2010 at 1:30 pm

On this Christmas night in 1959, the New Loew’s Capitol had its gala re-opening with the premiere of Edward Small-UA’s “Solomon and Sheba,” modestly advertised as “The Mightiest Motion Picture Ever Created!”. Tyrone Power had died of a heart attack during production, causing Yul Brynner to replace him in the title role opposite Gina Lollobrigida. Directed by King Vidor, the Super Technirama-70 and Technicolor epic started a continuous performance schedule the next day at 9:00am.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Brooklyn Paramount Theatre on Dec 25, 2010 at 10:15 am

On this Christmas Day in 1935, Warner Brothers broke tradition by opening one of its most important films of the year in downtown Brooklyn simultaneously with the premiere engagement in midtown Manhattan. The Brooklyn Paramount shared the B&W epic “Captain Blood,” starring Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland, with the Strand on Broadway at 47th Street. Both theatres now showed films only, but the Brooklyn Paramount had a lower price scale, with all seats at 25 cents until 2:00pm. The engagements were advertised separately to avoid price confusion.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Regal Theater on Dec 25, 2010 at 9:48 am

On this Christmas Day in 1959, the Regal opened its “Gala Holiday Show” for one week only. Topping the stage portion was the Miles Davis Sextette, plus Art Blakey & His Jazz Messengers, Sonny Stitt, the Jessie Powell Orchestra, singers Betty Carter and Bill Henderson, and the Four Step Brothers. On screen in its first Chicago showing was “Jet Over the Atlantic,” starring Guy Madison and Virginia Mayo.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Loew's Kings Theatre on Dec 25, 2010 at 7:07 am

The Brooklyn Tech Auditorium is well-equipped and large enough to compete with Loew’s Kings for entertainment bookings. Why spend many milions rehabilitating the Kings when the area already hss such a facility. Can it support two?

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Roxy Theatre on Dec 23, 2010 at 9:54 am

Today marks the 83rd anniversary of the opening of the Roxy’s very first Christmas presentation, which included William Fox’s silent romantic comedy, “Silk Legs,” starring Madge Bellamy and James Hall. But the massive stage spectacular was the most important element, with a cast of 250 performers and 110 musicians in the symphony-sized orchestra. Six years leter, “Roxy” Rothafel would move the stage concept to Radio City Music Hall, where it is still practiced today. The first at the Roxy included a musicalized “Cinderella” in five scenes; “Ballet of the Toys,” with prima ballerina Maria Gambarelli; “The Adoration,” a series of religious tableaux; and “Old English Christmas Carols,” with choristers grouped in the Gothic staircases adjoining both sides of the stage. “Gamby,” as the dancer became known to her legions of admirers, also performed in the first RCMH Christmas show in 1933.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Capitol Theatre on Dec 22, 2010 at 1:36 pm

Tonight marks the 45th anniversary of the opening at Loew’s Capitol of the world premiere engagement of David Lean’s film of Boris Pasternak’s “Doctor Zhivago” with a reserved-seat roadshow policy. Advertising said that the epic was in Panavision and MetroColor, with no mention of 70mm projection. Highest prices were $4.25, $3.75, and $3.00 on weekend nights and holidays. Two performances on New Year’s Eve at 8:00pm and midnight were scaled at $5.50, $4.75, and $3.75.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Rivoli Theatre on Dec 21, 2010 at 8:48 am

On this night in 1949, Cecil B. DeMille’s “Samson and Delilah” opened its dual world premiere engagement at the Paramount and Rivoli Theatres. More details here: /theaters/548/

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Paramount Theatre on Dec 21, 2010 at 8:45 am

On this night in 1949, Cecil B. DeMille’s “Samson and Delilah” opened its world premiere engagement at the Paramount and Rivoli Theatres with celebrity-studded performances covered by radio, TV, and newsreels. Continuous showings started the next day. Due to the Technicolor spectacle’s running time of 128 minutes, the Paramount’s stage show was shorter than usual, presenting only Russ Case and His Orchestra and Chorus. At the Rivoli, patrons received a bonus of magnascopic projection of the climactic scene in which Samson destroys the pagan temple.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Criterion Theatre on Dec 21, 2010 at 7:46 am

Tonight marks the 50th anniversary of the Criterion’s opening of the world premiere engagement of Columbia’s “Pepe,” with Mexican superstar Cantinflas, Dan Dailey, and Shirley Jones, which was presented as a reserved-seat roadshow. The CinemaScope extravaganza, with prints by Technicolor, boasted a supporting cast of 35 stars, including Frank Sinatra, Kim Novak, Bing Crosby, Maurice Chevalier, Sammy Davis, Jr., Jimmy Durante, Greer Garson, Edward G. Robinson,Debbie Reynolds, Jack Lemmon, and Judy Garland (in voice only). $3.50 was the top price for orchestra and loge seats on weekend nights and holidays.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Shore Theatre landmarked on Dec 21, 2010 at 6:48 am

I don’t understand the designation. What has been Landmaked? Just the exterior, or the entire building? The auditorium is in ruins.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Colonial Theatre on Dec 20, 2010 at 1:06 pm

The programme was for the original Colonial Theatre, which was demolished and replaced by the current building that serves as a church. The introduction says that the airdome (outdoor cinema) was on an adjacent lot, but some theatres had them on the roof. The airdomes usually operated only from May into September, closing when cold weather started.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes commented about Radio City Music Hall on Dec 20, 2010 at 8:43 am

Tomorrow (12/21) will mark the 77th anniversary of the opening of RCMH’s very first Christmas screen and stage show, which was quite similar to the holiday presentations that managing director S.L. Rothafel had assembled for his namesake Roxy Theatre before he quit to run the two new Rockefeller Center theatres. The film was RKO’s B&W musical, “Flying Down to Rio,” with Dolores Del Rio, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, and Gene Raymond. The stage show opened with the Synphony Orchestra’s processional, “The Nativity,” followed by a spectacular two-part version of “Coppelia” with music by Delibes and performed by the resident company of 500. Ballerina Marie Gambarelli was the principal dancer, and the Roxyettes (later known as the Rockettes) portrayed Christmas tree ornaments in a lavish toy shop scene.