Uptown Theatre

4816 North Broadway,
Chicago, IL 60640

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MichaelBeyer
MichaelBeyer on September 12, 2002 at 12:03 pm

2003 UPTOWN THEATRE CALENDARS – ADVANCE SALES

The Uptown Theatre 2003 calendar, IN COLOR, will be unveiled in mid-October. You marveled at, even framed, the beautiful B&W photos from the 2002 Uptown Theatre calendar. Our newest gem features 12 new equally beautiful photographs by Chicago photographer Loren Robare. It is our second and final calendar to showcase photos of the theatre in its current deteriorated state, and is sure to become a collector’s item. The 2004 calendar will proudly feature photos of the restoration of the Uptown Theatre.

Help to Bring Back the Brilliance, by purchasing your calendar(s) TODAY!

Log on to the gift shop on our web site www.uptowntheatrechicago.org and place your advance order. *******

MichaelBeyer
MichaelBeyer on September 12, 2002 at 12:01 pm

UR Chicago article (part two)

This is one landmark the city can’t afford to lose. Located in the most diverse neighborhood in the city — both economically, racially and ethnically — such an open, community-driven center would be an incredible asset. While renovating the space, a job training program will be used to help the unemployed shadow the skilled manual laborers, thereby allowing people with little or no income to earn both a paycheck and a skill. The rapidly growing Uptown community will have a vibrant entertainment district with the Aragon, the Riviera, the Green Mill, and the newly reopened Uptown Theatre in walking distance from each other. The old Goldblatt’s space is also being reworked to house a Border’s. “People have been trying to use this space for a while now, but I don’t think we were ever ready for it,” says Zipperer. “I think we’re ready for it now … in five years, I can see people having friends from out of town and bringing them to the Uptown as one of their top priorities.”

For more information or to volunteer, call Michael Morehead, the Director of Volunteer and Educational Programs at 773/561-5700, or see www.uptowntheatrechicago.com.

MichaelBeyer
MichaelBeyer on September 12, 2002 at 12:00 pm

UR CHICAGO ARTICLE (part 1 of 2)

UR Chicago ran the following article on page 9 of the DISTORTION section under the Flavor of the Month column. Link to article: View link

Saving History: Chicago’s only $2.5 million away from restoring the Uptown Theatre

By Terry Selucky

Back in the day, movie theatres were referred to as “palaces” and people came in droves to catch the latest motion picture. Moviegoing was widely considered immoral, so people sought to change that perception by dressing their best and frequenting theatres as grandiose as they were functional.

You might stumble across a skeleton of a palace like this around Chicago (the Oriental Theatre, the Chicago Theatre, the Aragon), but the most impressive of all these, the Uptown, is also the most rundown.

Located on Broadway just north of Lawrence Avenue, the Uptown Theatre is bigger in area than Radio City Music Hall, has more seats than any live indoor venue in Chicago, and is older than the “El.” Built in 1925 on the former beer garden of the Green Mill, the Uptown Theatre compared itself to “a castle in Old Spain upon which countless artists and sculptors have lavished their talents.” But after many starts and stops, the Uptown closed down in 1981 due to a lack of interest and money, and neglect has rendered the building unfit for use without renovations.

Enter the Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts, a not-for-profit corporation toiling since March 2001 to buy the theatre. If they raise $2.5 million dollars by October 4, they’ll have enough money to purchase the building and begin the process of restoring it. Renovations include a completely new electrical system, updated plumbing, heating and cooling systems and asbestos removal. A mainstage theatre with more than 4,000 seats, three smaller heatres, an art gallery, a museum, a radio station, gift shop and an arts education program for kids will be initiated within the space.

“With the economy in the current shape it’s in,” says Mark Zipperer, CEO of the Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts, “it’s a challenge to raise money to help fund the purchase.”

Building anything like the Uptown today would cost around $110 million, making the $2.5 million needed to buy it a bargain. And Zipperer ensures a money-back guarantee for the contributors. “If we don’t raise enough money by October 4, we give everyone their money back, whether it’s five dollars or five thousand.”

MichaelBeyer
MichaelBeyer on September 12, 2002 at 11:53 am

POLITICAL ENDORSEMENT

Excerpts From Alderman (48th Ward) Mary Ann Smith’s Letter of Endorsement
dated September 5, 2002

“I am delighted to offer my full support for the plans currently being proposed for the Uptown Theatre with the development team you are putting in place. This building is a treasure which I, along with dozens of other neighborhood people and preservationists nationwide have fought for decades to protect. It is imperative that this first best chance to restore the Theatre to an active and vibrant life be the best it can possibly be … My support for the plan is based on the caliber of the firms and individuals you have brought on board, whose knowledge and experience will maximize the prospects for the success of this huge undertaking … I, along with the rest of the 48th Ward community, look forward to working with you hand in hand to bring back the brilliance of the Uptown Theatre.”

MichaelBeyer
MichaelBeyer on September 12, 2002 at 11:49 am

The following article appeared in the Chicago Tribune Metro section on 9-6-02 by Arts Entertainment reporter Chris Jones.

Time is running out for Uptown Theatre Chris Jones

September 6, 2002

With plaster peeling from its walls and rainwater pooling on its historic floors, Chicago’s Uptown Theatre remains unrestored and in deteriorating condition.

The Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts, a non-profit group founded to restore and operate the building at 4816 N. Broadway, has an option to buy the building that expires Oct. 4. And the group still is more than $1 million short of the $2.5 million purchase price set by the building owner, Cercore Properties.

According to executive director Mark Zipperer, the group thus far has raised about $1.3 million, in addition to the original $1 million pledged to the cause by Albert I. Goodman. Most of Goodman’s initial donation has been used to pay staffers and fundraising expenses. However, an additional anonymous donor has contributed $1 million, which forms the bulk of the new funding.

Still, that leaves a big hole. And if the additional money is not raised within the next 30 days, Zipperer says he doubts the theater ever will be saved.

“We’re in the eleventh hour,” Zipperer said. “The building is deteriorating so fast.”

Up until this week, Ald. Mary Ann Smith (48th) had withheld her support from the Uptown Center for the Arts, which was mired in scandal when its former executive director, Michael Morrison, was charged in a civil suit with using some of Goodman’s donation for personal expenses.

Indeed, the luxury car currently being raffled by the theater formerly was leased by Morrison for his own use. But on Thursday, Smith said she now had changed her mind and decided to publicly support the group.

“A lot of people with substantial backgrounds in entertainment, development and law finally are coming on board,” Smith said. “I think people will pull the trigger on the money now that they know that the right plan is in place. I’m confident that the deadline will be met.”

Copyright © 2002, Chicago Tribune

MichaelBeyer
MichaelBeyer on August 8, 2002 at 12:09 pm

Chicago Free Press article (continued —part two)

Eight stories high, architects C.W. Rapp and George L. Rapp created what is still the largest free-standing theater in the United States, bigger than New York’s Radio City Music Hall, Balaban and Katz’s flagship Chicago Theatre and Chicago’s famed Auditorium Theatre.

The crowd of 12,000 that came to the first shows that day entered a cavernous grand lobby that later hosted early Hearts Foundation parties before the building was closed. From its marble baseboards and stained glass windows to its bronze railings and gold-leaf trim, the theater glistened with opulence.

And the opulence went well beyond the visual. Eight lobbies were built so the huge crowds could be managed between shows, and the theater featured a state-of-the-art air conditioning system that could not only completely exchange the air every two minutes, but could also dehumidify it, purify it, ozonize it and perfume it.

Its stage lighting system was the most sophisticated in the world, using 10,000 bulbs and capable of making 10 complete light changes in 14 seconds. The roof sign, with 12-foot-high lighted letters, could be seen from the Loop. In a final flourish, in 1928 Balaban and Katz installed a Wurlitzer Grande pipe organ that was the most expensive ever built.

People and Hollywood stars flocked to the palace through the 1930s. But when movie attendance trailed off in the 1940s, Balaban and Katz tried other ways to turn a profit at the Uptown, even hosting the 1950s TV game show, “Queen for a Day,” at times. By the 1970s, entrepreneur Rene Rabiela featured Spanish-language movies and hosted rock concerts featuring such performers as Bob Marley, the Grateful Dead, Peter Gabriel, Santana and others.

But, unable to make a consistent profit, the Uptown closed its doors for the last time in 1981 and ownership reverted to the Plitt movie chain. Plitt never reopened the Uptown and disaster struck in the 1983-1984 winter when, with the heat shut off, water pipes burst, flooding the basement, ruining much of the plaster walls and making restoration inevitable if the grand palace was ever to be opened again.

Zipperer says architects and preservationists estimate the building can be fully restored for $22-$28 million, still a bargain considering what it would cost to duplicate. And a restored Uptown Theatre, Zipperer says, would once again be the crown jewel of a vibrant cultural scene and nightlife in Uptown.

“It’s a key piece of property in Uptown,” says Zipperer, also president of the Buena Park Neighborhood Association just south of Uptown. “The community here is our best advocate. People are passionate about this building.”

MichaelBeyer
MichaelBeyer on August 8, 2002 at 12:04 pm

(Part one)

The buzz continues! Chicago Free Press ran a front page article on the Uptown Theatre in the August 7 issue. Pick up a copy off the newstand and check out the amazing shots of the interior taken by photographer Jason Smith. Link to article: View link

******* THIS OLD THEATER NON-PROFIT POLISHING TARNISHED UPTOWN JEWEL

By Gary Barlow Staff writer

Even with the dust, the crumbling patches of plaster and the tarnished wood and metal flourishes, the interior of the Uptown Theatre evokes looks of awe.

For starters, it is huge, from the grand lobby on Broadway to the tiered 4,400-seat theater. Built as the crown jewel of one of America’s premier theater chains as the golden age of film dawned in 1925, it’s been shuttered for two decades.

That could change, if an Uptown group racing against time to save and restore it succeeds in getting the community support it needs.

“Every day that passes by is lost,” says Mark Zipperer, CEO of the non-profit Uptown Theatre and Center for the Performing Arts. “We may not be able to restore the building in five years.”

Now, Zipperer says, the time and circumstances are right for refurbishing the Uptown.

“Ten years ago, the neighborhood wasn’t ready for it,” he says. But in the past decade, the neighborhood has changed; gay and lesbian Chicagoans in particular have moved to Uptown in large numbers. The organization Zipperer leads in the effort to save the Uptown reflects the area’s changing demographics.

“There’s an equation about neighborhoods evolving,” Zipperer says. “There now needs to be community areas to support that.”

The group has an agreement with the property’s owners to buy the theater for about $2.5 million if it can raise the money by Oct. 20. Walking through the musty but still ornate lobby, Zipperer makes it clear that he thinks closing the deal is both a community imperative and an incredible bargain.

“In today’s dollars, it would cost about $110 million to duplicate this building,” he says, walking up one of the grand circular staircases rising from the lobby to the balcony level of the theater.

“All this stuff can be saved,” Zipperer says. “It might look bad in spots, but structurally it was built to withstand anything.”

That was the boast when the Uptown, just north of Lawrence on Broadway, opened Aug. 18, 1925. “Built for all time,” its owners, Barney Balaban and Sam Katz, declared. It was and is an imposing Spanish baroque movie palace. (cont.)

MichaelBeyer
MichaelBeyer on July 31, 2002 at 1:03 pm

TOURS OFFER FIRST PUBLIC GLIMPSE INSIDE HISTORIC UPTOWN THEATRE IN TWO DECADES

CHICAGO (July 31, 2002)

For the first time in more than two decades, Chicago’s historic Uptown Theatre will open its doors to a limited number of the general public interested in glimpsing the grandeur of what was once one of the most famous movie palaces in the country, and learning more about current efforts to restore the landmark theatre. David Bahlman, President of the Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois, and Mark Zipperer, Chief Executive Officer of the Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts, a not-for-profit group dedicated to purchasing and restoring the Uptown to its former artistic, architectural and cultural prominence, will host public tours of the theatre at noon, Tuesday, August 13, and 6 p.m., Wednesday, August 14.

Each tour will be limited to a maximum of 30 people and reservations are being accepted by phone only, on a first-come, first-served basis, at (773) 381-6312. Cost is a tax-deductible donation of $15 per person to the Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts. The Uptown Theatre is located at 4814-4816 N. Broadway, near the corner of Broadway and Lawrence Avenues, in the center of Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood.

Built in 1925 by the Chicago-based Balaban & Katz movie palace empire and designed by world-renowned Chicago architects Rapp & Rapp, the 4,381-seat Uptown was touted at its opening as ‘an acre of seats in a magic city.’ It remains the country’s largest freestanding theatre building in terms of square footage and one of the top five in seating capacity. “”

MichaelBeyer
MichaelBeyer on July 8, 2002 at 7:19 am

Crain’s Chicago Business ran the following article in the July 8 issue. Link to article:
View link


July 06, 2002

Uptown Theatre Seeks Funds

A group dedicated to restoring Chicago’s Uptown Theatre is kicking off a series of eight fund-raising events this week as part of an effort to raise $4 million to purchase the building before an Oct. 5 deadline.

The non-profit Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts, which last month signed a 120-day letter of intent to buy the dilapidated theater from Cercore Properties Corp., is targeting local business leaders, preservation groups and the philanthropic community in its campaign.

The group will also host the first public tours of the structure in more than two decades later this summer as part of the fund-raising drive.

In addition to the purchase price, estimates of the restoration costs for the theater range from $18 million to $30 million.


To make a donation to the Uptown Theatre restoration project,

Mail to:
Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts
4707 N. Broadway, Suite 315
Chicago, IL 60640

Visit us on the web at: www.uptowntheatrechicago.com
Or, call us: 773-561-5700

MichaelBeyer
MichaelBeyer on July 2, 2002 at 3:40 am

Inside Online article

(continued – part 2)

One of the ways he wants to include the community in the restoration of their theater is to collect stories of the residents. “One woman who now lives in the Edgewater Beach Apartments reminisced about when she was a child, she and her girlfriend would throw water balloons from the top balcony and, when chased by the Andy Frain ushers, they would hide in the woman’s washroom.” Zipperer and the Uptown’s public relations firm are thinking of publishing a book of these remembrances for the grand re-opening of the theater on its 80th anniversary in 20005.

“The Uptown opened August 18, 1925, at noon. At 2 p.m. when the first show emptied, 12,000 people were in a line for the next show,” Zipperer said. “I want to get everyone involved, not just big donors. Even someone with just a few dollars will be welcome and I hope that when they are 80 years old they will pass the theater and say to themselves, ‘See, I helped keep our Uptown Theater for all of us.’”

“It is a precious part of our community and also of my family,” Al Goodman added. “The theater will be dedicated to all the employees of my grandmother’s Appleton Electric Company who fought in World War II.” The factory was on Wellington St. and Paulina Ave. before it became condos. It is the Appleton foundation that has pledged its financial support for the Uptown.

Viewed as pivotal piece in the redevelopment of Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood, the Uptown Theater is the country’s largest freestanding theater building in terms of square footage. It was designed by famed Chicago architects Rapp & Rapp and was one of the crown jewels of the national Balaban & Katz movie palace empire.

Shuttered since 1981, the Uptown has been listed on “America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places” by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. It is also on the National Register of Historic Places and the Illinois Historic Structures Survey and is protected as a Chicago Landmark.

“We are always looking for volunteers to stuff envelopes and keep our lists current,” said Zipperer. “Or to man our information booths that we plan to have in most neighborhood festivals where we will sell T-shirts to raise money.”

The Uptown Theater and Center for the Arts, a 501©(3) not-for-profit corporation incorporated in March 2001, is comprised of business, theater, and other professionals from the Uptown community who are committed to purchasing and restoring the Uptown Theater to its former prominence.


To make a donation to the Uptown Theatre restoration project,

Mail to:
Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts, 4707 N. Broadway, Suite 315,
Chicago, IL 60640

or visit us on the web at: www.uptowntheatrechicago.com
or call us: 773-561-5700

MichaelBeyer
MichaelBeyer on July 2, 2002 at 3:35 am

Inside Newspaper ran a front page article about the Uptown Theatre restoration project in the June 19 – June 25 edition.

Text from Inside Online (part 1):


Inside Newspaper
“Legendary Uptown Theater gets a boost”

By: Jim Sterne
News Editor

An agreement signed last Wednesday, June 19, between the not-for-profit Uptown Theater and Center for the Arts and Cercore Properties Corp. breathes new life into the groups' bid to purchase and restore the historic Uptown Theater to its original grandeur.

In the first major initiative spearheaded by Uptown Theater and Center for the Arts' newly-appointed Chief Executive Officer Mark Zipperer, the agreement allowing the group to buy the landmark building is extended from the original deadline of December 2001 to early October 2002.

“We need $4 million to complete the purchase, stabilize the theater, replenish our operating funds, and rekindle the fundraising campaign,” Zipperer said. The fundraising campaign that was started last July when Albert I. Goodman, on behalf of the Edith-Marie Appleton Foundation, kicked off the drive to renovate the theater with a generous gift of $1 million and a pledge of continuing support.

“My belief in the importance of purchasing and restoring the historic Uptown for future generations is stronger than ever,” said Goodman. “It’s not only a treasure for the citizens of Chicago, it’s a gem for us to share with all America.” Goodman added that, “I have pledged another million dollars if the theater can raise the $3 million.”

Zipperer, who expressed confidence that funding for purchasing the theater will be finalized by early October, is a Board Member of the Uptown Chicago Commission and president of the Buena Park Neighborhood Association, the Uptown area’s largest block club. He has just been elected to the Local School Council for Disney Magnet School, where he will serve as budgeting manager responsible for fundraising , increasingly important as the city’s financial crisis forces budget cuts in all areas.

“You get a good feeling when you do something for the community,” Zipperer said, “It’s as simple as that.” He has lived in Uptown for ten years and is excited about the TIFs for Wilson Yard and Lawrence and Broadway. “The Uptown theater will be the anchor for the whole area.”

The 37-year-old Zipperer hails from the Milwaukee area and graduated from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in finance and real estate.

(continued)

JamesAPierce
JamesAPierce on June 20, 2002 at 8:10 pm

FYI: Friends of the Uptown, Chicago, a longtime volunteer advocacy remains intact and active. Volunteer activity began at the theater in 1977, continued through its closure in 1981 and has safeguarded it ever since. Stay in touch with news and views about the Uptown Theatre by subscribing to Uptown Adviser at http://www.uptowntheatre.com
Archived editions of Uptown Adviser online may be read at: View link

MarkZipperer
MarkZipperer on June 19, 2002 at 10:50 am

Dear Friends,
Recently, I have accepted the role as CEO of the Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts. By now, you have probably heard the exciting news about our renewed effort to purchase the Uptown Theatre. Recently we entered into a purchase agreement with the current owner of the Theatre that will enable us the exclusive right to purchase this historic property within the next 120 days.

Currently, I am spearheading a campaign to raise $4 million to complete the purchase of the Theatre building. This campaign will also enable us to stabilize/winterize the building, replenish our operating budget, and provide the funding necessary to allow us to kick off a campaign to secure all funds necessary to completely restore the Theatre to its original grandeur.

Although we have already made considerable progress toward our goals, many have asked us, “How can I help?” GLAD YOU ASKED! First and foremost, we are seeking donations, which will be reserved strictly for the purchase of the Theatre. Because we have only 15 weeks to complete this purchase, we must quickly raise the remaining needed funds. Thankfully we already have commitments toward a portion of the $4 million.

The best way to donate is online at: www.uptowntheatrechicago.com. Click the “SUPPORT” button on the left and then “donate online.” Or, you can mail your donation to our office address listed below.

If you’d like a more detailed perspective about our strategic plan to make this restoration a success, please call and set up an appointment and we’ll talk in person.

We are in the process also expanding our current board of directors. As such, we’re looking for committed people with expertise in the following areas to be a part of our board:

  • Management and Leadership
  • Finance/Legal/Human Resources
  • Marketing and Public Relations
  • Restoration, Architecture and Historic Preservation
  • Nominations (seeking out other board members)

If you are interested in a board position, please e-mail your biography with a short summary about why you are interested in saving the Uptown Theatre to:

And finally, if you know someone who you think might be a donor or potential board member, please forward this e-mail on to that person (s).

Remember, time is of the essence, and we need everyone’s help to save this historic Chicago landmark!

Best regards,

Mark M. Zipperer
Chief Executive Officer
Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts
4707 N. Broadway, Suite 315
Chicago, IL 60640
Phone: 773-561-5700
Fax: 773.784.5900
www.uptowntheatrechicago.com

MichaelBeyer
MichaelBeyer on June 19, 2002 at 10:35 am

RADIO INTERVIEW that will be webcasted!
WLUW-FM 88.7 (Loyola University Radio)
Date: Friday, June 21, 2002
Time: after 2:00 pm

Mark Zipperer, newly appointed CEO of the Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts, will be interviewed on “Stephen in the Evenin'” by Nick Tristano. The 7-10 minute segment will be a casual interview on the group’s plans for the Uptown Theatre.

Tune in to the show via webcast at http://www.stephenintheevenin.com/
The show is on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 6-10 pm and Fridays 2-6 pm.

For more information on the Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts, check out the official web site:
uptowntheatrechicago.com

MichaelBeyer
MichaelBeyer on June 19, 2002 at 10:28 am

CHICAGO (June 11, 2002)

An agreement signed last Wednesday between the not-for-profit Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts and Cercore Properties Corp. breathes new life into the group’s bid to purchase and restore the historic Uptown Theatre to its original grandeur. In the first major initiative spearheaded by Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts' newly-appointed Chief Executive Officer Mark Zipperer, the agreement extends through early October the contract allowing the group to buy the landmark building, which originally expired in December 2001.

The top priority of the Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts now, according to Zipperer, is to re-build the momentum of the fundraising campaign that was started last July, when Albert I. Goodman, on behalf of the Edith-Marie Appleton Foundation, kicked off the drive to renovate the historic Uptown Theatre with a generous gift of $1 million and a pledge of continuing support.

“My belief in the importance of purchasing and restoring the historic Uptown for future generations is stronger than ever,” said Goodman. “It’s not only a treasure for the citizens of Chicago, it’s a gem for us to share with all America.”

Zipperer, who expressed confidence that funding for purchasing the theatre will be finalized by early October, is a Board Member of the Uptown Chicago Commission and president of the Buena Park Neighborhood Association, the Uptown area’s largest block club. Professionally, his credentials span 14 years of marketing, management and financial experience with Andersen, UCC TotalHome of Chicago, General Electric Company and the Joffrey Ballet of Chicago. He also serves as the Vice Chairman of the Walt Disney Magnet School Local School Council and a member of the Dance for Life Corporate Donation Committee.

The 37-year-old Zipperer hails from the Milwaukee area and graduated from the University of Wisconsin with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in Finance and Real Estate.

“The future of Uptown has never shone brighter,” said Zipperer. “Working together and drawing upon the strength of our diversity, we have the opportunity to restore a building that is a key part of our history, promote tourism, create jobs within the community, make theatre more readily accessible to area children, and eventually provide a home to many theatre groups that cannot currently afford one.”

cjcarlson
cjcarlson on January 23, 2002 at 2:26 pm

Contrary to Mr. Pierce’s comments to mkmarshall, a great deal is happening at the Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts. However, not all of our plans have been disseminated to the public at this time. We are currently in the midst of an aggressive capital campaign. For continual updates on our progress, visit the official web site at www.uptowntheatrechicago.com

mkmarshall
mkmarshall on January 18, 2002 at 12:15 pm

I received an e-mail from James Pierce today in response to my inquiry about work on the Uptown, and he said he wasn’t aware of any new progress as of 1-18-02. The organization has a great website with a lot of good information at http://uptowntheatrechicago.com.

CarolJeanCarlson
CarolJeanCarlson on November 30, 2001 at 1:40 pm

The official website of the Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts, the group that has as its mission the restoration of the Uptown theatre is up and running. Check us out at www.uptowntheatrechicago.com

JamesAPierce
JamesAPierce on August 6, 2001 at 10:44 am

Thank you for your interest in the Uptown Theatre, Chicago. You can learn more at http://www.uptowntheatre.com

A new web site, http://www.uptowntheatrechicago.com is coming soon. It will support the Uptown Theatre and Center for the Arts, a renovation and reuse project. Again, thank you for your interest! More good news coming soon!

JevonTruesdale
JevonTruesdale on February 26, 2001 at 7:23 pm

I am looking for anyone interested in pursuing a business venture involving the Uptown theater. The idea I have in mind involves using the theater for film presentation and not for live venues. I live in Chicago and would be happy to provide contact information to anyone who is really serious about this proposition. Please contact me by email.