Nuart Theatre

11272 Santa Monica Boulevard,
Los Angeles, CA 90025

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Showing 26 - 50 of 65 comments

Hockey Dude
Hockey Dude on May 9, 2009 at 3:16 am

Interesting film by a young local director, RD Hall. It was nice to sit in there for a couple of hours. Many of those who attended had never been in the Rialto when it was in operation. The insides have been pretty much well preserved. Interseting to note that the film was actually projected digitally from a DVD projector in the balcony, and it was able to achieve the standard aspect ratio. I’d say about 200 people made the show. Cant wait for the next show.

Hockey Dude
Hockey Dude on May 8, 2009 at 10:32 pm

The show at the Rialto is at 8:30 PM May 8th 2009

Hockey Dude
Hockey Dude on May 8, 2009 at 11:26 am

Hey everybody, local South Pas kid and amateur filmmaker, R.D.Hall, will be premiering him Noir Horror/Gangster movie at the Rialto in South Pasadena on May 8th, 2009. The One-Sheet was created by another South Pas kid, local art legend, Jimi(not the tattoo artist)Martinez. Admission is free, as is the popcorn and refreshments. Whoa! Friday night at the movies!!! Lets all go support indie filmmaking…Rialto rocks!!!

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on December 30, 2008 at 8:47 pm

The Nuart probably opened in 1930. Southwest Builder & Contractor’s issue of March 21, 1930, carried an item about the construction contracts for the theater. Motion Picture Herald of March 26, 1932, mentioned a management change at the Nuart Theatre in Sawtelle. In 1939, the house was already being remodeled and redecorated and getting a new marquee, according to an item in Boxoffice Magazine’s issue of August 5th that year.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on December 29, 2008 at 12:20 pm

I saw “Pink Flamingos” at the TLA in Philadelphia, around 1981. Waters had just written a book and was there to answer questions and sign autographs. A very personable guy.

lisasutton
lisasutton on December 29, 2008 at 4:43 am

I saw Pink Flamingoes at a midnight screening in 1978 with about 8 people in the audience . One of those 8 was John Waters, who spoke with us after the show. and answered all our questions. He went on to tell us about his plans for a main-stream movie based on an overweight pimply-faced teenager who loved to dance. A few years later, “Hairspray” was released.

ndavick
ndavick on November 23, 2008 at 8:55 am

I managed the Nuart for a few years in the late 70s and remember the great clientele. Patrons stood in long lines and squeezed in the last single seats left for their favorite movies. Changing movies daily was sometimes a challenge when the freight company shipped the movie late and the quality of the film wasn’t its best. The projectionist, Steve Oliver, would have to cut and splice the film together right before showing. Linda Rondstat stood in line with her then boyfriend, Jerry Brown. I cannot recall the movie they saw. Edie the Egg Lady, from Pink Flamingos, played in a band on stage. Her drummer was Gina Schock, soon to be a Go-Go. Edie, God rest her sole, was not cut out for singing, but it was a fun night. The director of Eraserhead, David Lynch, came in a few times to watch his film at midnight.

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on September 23, 2008 at 6:21 am

That’s a lot of bicycles out front!

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on April 16, 2008 at 8:38 pm

Here is a 2002 photo from the LA Times site:
http://tinyurl.com/6nykex

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on March 31, 2008 at 10:08 pm

I bet AMC didn’t have a hand in it, but that the production design staff just picked up cups at the closest movie theater.

HowardBHaas
HowardBHaas on March 31, 2008 at 8:31 pm

And,as William, implies, “product placement” means compensation. AMC paying the TV show (and also compensating Landmark for using the Nuart). It is likely worth more to AMC because they are nationwide in more markets than Landmark. So, Justin, it isn’t dishonestly changing the affiliation, but merely inserting a commercial inside the show!

William
William on March 31, 2008 at 8:28 pm

It’s the production company’s art department that dresses the set and the deals that the production company makes for product placement not CBS.

moviebuff82
moviebuff82 on March 31, 2008 at 8:19 pm

Tivo alert…on tonight’s new episode of The Big Bang Theory, the main guys go to this theater to see a revival of the Apes movies. The only difference is that the concessions are AMC brands, not Landmark!!! How shameful that CBS chose to make the Nuart as an AMC theater and not Landmark.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on July 14, 2007 at 11:38 pm

The Nu-Art showed “Birth of a Nation” in July 1970. I recall that the owner of the Silent Movie theater scheduled a showing a few years ago, but canceled due to community objection.

georgepeter
georgepeter on May 29, 2007 at 10:29 pm

Eraserhead played ther for years i recall. I recall seeing The Elephant Man in Westwood Village then driving to The Nuart to see Eraserhead for the fifth time. It was a great movie night.

hermit
hermit on May 28, 2007 at 9:33 pm

I saw a film in the 70s I’m quite sure at the Nuart but can’t remember director or name. Can you help me. The story was about a girl name beauty queen of a French town/village and a millionaire who fell in love with her. She wouldn’t move to NYC with him becuase she didn’t want to leave her father, etc…he finally decided the only way he could marry her was to move the village to NYC. So at the end you see this French village in NYC and I remember some older French men sitting on a bridge, Brooklyn?? and throwing peelings, avocado? which cause a traffic accident. Very whimsical and fun and I’ve run out of ideas to track it down. Please help!!!! Chihully

dispar
dispar on April 18, 2007 at 9:51 am

SEXBEATLE: What did you lose at that show?

Troy Martin
Troy Martin on April 18, 2007 at 3:17 am

I saw “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” here.

bporter
bporter on August 11, 2006 at 1:19 am

Tonight was my first time at the Nuart since the recent renovation, and it was a very sad experience. They’ve given the auditorium a black and gray color scheme, widened the aisles, and installed new, high-backed seats that rock back and forth. First off, I found the seats incredibly uncomfortable. The armrests are too high, and the high backs and extended width between the aisles means that you can no longer slouch back and put your feet up on the next aisle (somthing that you used to be able to do without disturbing anyone, considering that the Nuart is seldom packed). And the rocking doesn’t do it for me, particularly since the wide aisles make it difficult to anchor your feet to the floor.

But beyond the reduced comfort, the whole aesthetic of the place is incredibly disappointing. It seems like they’ve decided to “Arclight” the place, meaning that they’ve gone for a modern, all-black look, I guess in an attempt to make it look more hip and “arty.”

The red color scheme that they used to have was perfect. For me, the color red signifies “old-time movie house” for some reason. And even though I don’t know how the Nuart originally looked (I only started to go in the late-80’s), it definitely seemed like it could have been the original decor, or at least quite similar to it.

And what was wrong with the old auditorium, anyways? The seats were comfortable and in good shape, and the place always seemed pretty clean. Over years of going there, I never once thought, “The Nuart is getting kind of run-down.”

They’ve also changed the lobby and box-office, although these parts are still being worked on. The biggest change so far is that they’ve gotten rid of the old-style, stand alone box office and built it into the rest of the theatre (I guess I didn’t take all that good of a look, but I think they’ve achieved this by building a wall that extends into the lobby, reducing the width of the space under the marquee).

The outside decor,particularly the box office, reminds me of the Film Forum and the new IFC Center in New York. And here, again, I’m incredibly saddened. The Film Forum and IFC Center play a lot of the same programming as the Nuart (they’re basically the NY equivalents), and for years I used to claim to my NY friends that one of the advantages of LA over NY is that the primary revival theatre/art house in the city is an actual old-style movie theatre, instead of some cramped, crappy “film center.”

Which leads me to my last point—At least they didn’t split it! I guess if Landmark wanted to bring in more revenue (although they’ve lost at least 100 seats, which they’ll surely miss if they get another Blair Witch Project or Blade Runner), we should be thankful they’ve decided to make it look more like the Arclight rather than completely destroy it by cutting it up. So curse you/thank you Marc Cuban.

dispar
dispar on June 3, 2006 at 3:35 pm

And we former patrons (1977 – 1987), do love the Nuart! Thanks for the note on the trailers (I still remember the NO SMOKING trailer).

DOUGLASBRIANMARTIN
DOUGLASBRIANMARTIN on May 30, 2006 at 6:37 pm

RE: Gary Meyer on Dec 14, 2003 at 5:56am John Waters did not create the now renowned NO SMOKING trailer – he starred in it, as he is a star. I produced and directed three trailers in a New York City loft in support of the SHOCK VALUE FILM FESTIVAL that was marketed nationwide through Landmark Theatre Corporation in the early 1980’s to assist in marketing John’s book SHOCK VALUE. The SHOCK VALUE trailer was kicked back by the Texas censors with an orange obscenity band due to the use of the words masturbation and coprophagy. (John wanted to change the script to use more common terms for anatomy and excretions but I insisted on sticking to the script – little good it did) The THANK YOU NUART FOR MAKING DIVINE THE FILTH GODDESS and the NO SMOKING TRAILER were filmed at the same time. All were filmed as written. I carried the latent image reels back to LA in my carry-on luggage and transferred the 16mm original negative up to 35mm for theatrical use. The Film Festival, with the NUART Theatre as base, was a runaway success, and the NO SMOKING trailer, created as an added attraction to give Nuart patrons even more reasons to love the NUART, has gone on to become an icon. Nice.