Loew's Triboro Theatre

2804 Steinway Street,
Astoria, NY 11103

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alexandi
alexandi on February 20, 2008 at 10:00 am

Thank you astrocks!! Ed Solero said i could find all theatres here, but i didn’t find the Olympia. It was located on the west side of the street i believe. I can visualize the pink neon “Olympia” sign, in script. I don’t remember the Cameo at all tho.

frankdev
frankdev on February 20, 2008 at 12:11 am

The Olympia was located on steinway street Between 28th and 25th aves
Closer to 25th. at one time it was called the Cameo, and played regular films

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on February 19, 2008 at 7:35 pm

All those theatres are listed on this site, alexandi. You may want to track them down and post any memories you wish to share. At the top left of this page, there is a Search button. If you click the selection for “theaters” and then click the Search button, a page will open where you can enter “Astoria” and search “by City.” A list of all the movie theatres filed on Cinema Treasures as having existed (or as currently existing) in Astoria will open up.

alexandi
alexandi on February 19, 2008 at 3:41 pm

The Olympia Theatre showed dirty movies. I don’t remember where it was.
The Strand was located on the north side of Broadway just past Crescent St. It later became a lower level bowling alley. It might still be.
There was a theatre under the L on 31st St. between Ditmars & 23rd Ave., approx. where McDonald’s is now, that showed Greek movies in my childhood.
The Astoria Theatre on 30th Ave. & Steinway St. was ok, not very well kept. But Loew’s down the block on 28th Ave. was spectacular and grandiose. I must have been around 12 yrs old when they tore it down, and even then I thought why on earth, with the twinkling ceiling and ornate balconies and all?? If they had to tear one down, it should’ve been the Astoria.

alexandi
alexandi on February 19, 2008 at 3:41 pm

The Olympia Theatre showed dirty movies. I don’t remember where it was.
The Strand was located on the north side of Broadway just past Crescent St. It later became a lower level bowling alley. It might still be.
There was a theatre under the L on 31st St. between Ditmars & 23rd Ave., approx. where McDonald’s is now, that showed Greek movies in my childhood.
The Astoria Theatre on 30th Ave. & Steinway St. was ok, not very well kept. But Loew’s down the block on 28th Ave. was spectacular and grandiose. I must have been around 12 yrs old when they tore it down, and even then I thought why on earth, with the twinkling ceiling and ornate balconies and all?? If they had to tear one down, it should’ve been the Astoria.

AlexNYC
AlexNYC on February 1, 2008 at 10:29 pm

John, thanks for sharing your memorable experience at the Loew’s Triboro Theater, I enjoyed reading about it.

johndereszewski
johndereszewski on January 21, 2008 at 7:24 am

I only visited this movie palace on one occasion – it was on April 8, 1970. I was going to college at the time and drove up with my parents from Greenpoint on a non-school weekday to see “The Prime of Miss Jeanne Brodie” Maggie Smith had just won the best actress award for the role, and we wanted to check it out.

I guess in the rush to get our tickets, I did not pay much attention to the outstanding exterior, which I certainly now regret. The interior was another thing, and it really overwhelmed me. I had never seen anything so opulent in a movie theater – especially one situated away from Manhattan. The fact that the Triboro had not been separated into a multi-screen complex enabled me to experience its full, originally intended, grandeur. The fact that the place was nearly empty gave me a sense that this situation would not continue to last for long.

As was common at the time, we entered the theater after the performance had begun, and my parents then watched the portion we had missed before leaving. Since I really enjoyed the movie – and the ambiance of the house – I stayed to see the entire show until the end. While Smith was terrific, I remember being particularly impressed with the performance of Pamela Franklin, who played Miss Brodie’s “assassin”. The scene between the two near the end was particularly compelling and was something I did wish to view again. (At the time, I really thought that Ms. Franklin would enjoy an outstanding cinematic career. Unfortunately, it quickly petered out in the wake of several awful movie and forgettable TV roles.)

After finally leaving, I walked back to the nearest “G” train station and passed a news stand. Reading the headline of the NY Post, which was then an afternoon paper that was as stridently liberal as it is now relentlessly conservative, I learned that Harrold Carrswell’s nomination to the the Supreme Court had surprisingly been rejected by the Senate. (As a Political Science major, I was particularly interested in this issue – and elated by the result.) This is why I can reference my visit to this exact date.

Several years later, I found myself on Steinway St. and decided to check out the Triboro. Walking up from the subway station, I noticed that the huge sign announcing the “Loew’s Triboro” was not there. After passing a small development of newly constructed apartments and still finding no Triboro, I was forced to conclude that I had just walked by the old movie theater. While I was – and remain – saddened that the Triboro is history, I will always fondly remember my one visit to it.

astorian
astorian on May 29, 2007 at 3:18 pm

I was a child when bomb exploded in the Triboro, but I seem to remember a Daily News headline that claimed it was the work of The Mad Bomber who set explosives in several NYC theaters. From the CO2 cartridge description, however, that would not have been true.

I grew up on 42nd Street near 28th Avenue and could see the Triboro from my window. My dad told me that the Hellman’s mayonnaise was made there, but if I remember correctly he said the Hellmans had a deli there and the mayonnaise was just one product, though it later became their main product. He also told me that before the enclosed movie theaters were built on Steinway, there were several open-air “theaters” that showed movies. One I believe he said was on the west side of Steinway at the intersection of 25th Avenue (across from where the Cameo/Olympia was built).

Paul Noble
Paul Noble on February 17, 2007 at 2:52 am

I recall in the early 40’s that the Triboro and the Valencia had far smaller screens than the type described in the article above. Was there a shortage of carbon during WW2 and did that have any effect on screen size? The screens had rounded corners.

frankdev
frankdev on February 14, 2007 at 11:00 am

I heard that lowlife Coleman went bankrupt, is that true?

frankdev
frankdev on February 12, 2007 at 10:22 am

Warren You always have great stuff, and again I thank you!!

AlexNYC
AlexNYC on February 7, 2007 at 3:32 pm

Who would have ever guessed a mayonnais factory preceeded the Loew’s Triboro Theater at that site? Isn’t history amazing?

frankdev
frankdev on February 7, 2007 at 10:18 am

Warren Thank You very much for the above info, i never knew that.

Life's Too Short
Life's Too Short on December 13, 2006 at 6:38 pm

What a shame. It seems like it was quite original.

AlexNYC
AlexNYC on December 13, 2006 at 5:41 pm

Great photo Warren, brings back memories of how I remembered the theater. I recall this theater and the RKO Keith were the only ones where I used to prefer to sit in the balcony section to see the features so I could admire the architectural reliefs on the walls and ceiling.

frankdev
frankdev on December 12, 2006 at 8:51 am

Thanks Warren that was a great shot!!

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on August 15, 2006 at 7:21 am

A pair of Jerry Lewis re-releases were running at the Triboro the weekend JFK was assassinated:
Fab-u-Lewis – LI Star Journal 11/23/63

I bet the prospect of back-to-back Lewis features was a lot scarier than the alleged horror twin bill that was advertised as coming to the Triboro the following Wednesday.

AlexNYC
AlexNYC on July 22, 2006 at 3:54 pm

One the Steinway Street side (the front) there is a row of stores with two stories of apartments above. One the back side (38th street) is a row of two family homes. Today the tought of tearing down the Loews Triboro for something so mundane and ordinary boggles the mind.

ShortyC
ShortyC on July 13, 2006 at 2:35 pm

What is on the current site of the former Loews Triboro?

frankdev
frankdev on December 7, 2005 at 4:17 pm

Warren THANK YOU THANK YOU< it was great to see the inside again.

AlexNYC
AlexNYC on September 2, 2005 at 11:15 am

Thnaks for the photos of the inside of the theater, it brings back alot of memories. What a glorious theater it was, and what a disgrace politics allowed to be razed for a bunch of rowhouses. I recall hearing during 1974 that there was going to be a large department store built in it’s place, so I was very suprised when houses went up in it’s place. What a waste. Go figure.

RobertR
RobertR on July 8, 2005 at 9:11 am

Nobody has added the Manhattan Roosevelt on 145 St see the ad I have posted on the 125 St Apollo and Cinerama site.

BoxOfficeBill
BoxOfficeBill on July 8, 2005 at 8:50 am

That’s a great photo of today’s Steinway and 28th Street. I recently circumnavigated the neighborhood looking for the great Titan Greek Supermarket, all the while wondering where the Triboro had once stood. This block of rowhouses would never have occured to me as the location.

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on July 8, 2005 at 8:15 am

The Triboro Theatre located on 125th Street, Harlem was known as the Gotham Theatre, already listed here http://cinematreasures.org/theatre/6523/

br91975
br91975 on July 8, 2005 at 6:40 am

The Triboro (which I’m too young to have attended) was torn down for THOSE?!? What… a… disgrace…