Walker Theater

6401 18th Avenue,
Brooklyn, NY 11204

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Showing 26 - 50 of 85 comments

ERD
ERD on December 21, 2006 at 3:54 am

I was told the Walker opened in 1927 by a person who worked there many years ago-not 1929. Perhaps some member knows for sure.

Dee
Dee on July 31, 2006 at 2:49 am

This is not really about the Walker theater. My dad, Erwin Bader taught social studies at Shallow, 1954-1981. Shallow used the Walker for graduation. If you would like to share any memories of him with me I would be thrilled. Thanks.

ERD
ERD on July 12, 2006 at 5:37 am

As I said in my many posts, above, the Walker would be one of the most practical former theatres to restore. It is a project that should be looked into. If I would live in the area, I would have done so already.

frankie
frankie on July 12, 2006 at 5:04 am

Yes, RobertR, isn’t it a wonderful dream ? I just wonder if people in Bensonhurst would support it. I know I’d come there from South Brooklyn all the time. I spoke to Marty Markowitz at the Prospect Park concert last night, and he claims to have a kind of combo public/private plan for the Loew’s Kings during his last 3 years. Better than nothing, but it would take a real miracle to pull THAT off ! Meanwhile, we have the Loew’s Jersey City to look forward to in the fall !

RobertR
RobertR on July 10, 2006 at 6:03 am

This would be so easy to put back together as a theatre.

frankie
frankie on July 10, 2006 at 5:48 am

All the Koreans taking over 18th Avenue might scare away any possible “developers-theater lovers”. But if stars like Debbie Reynolds can play the Bronx and Rita Moreno & Mitzi Gaynor can play Brooklyn College and The Redgraves & Cate Blanchett can play BAM, maybe the Walker is ripe for renaissance !

ERD
ERD on June 6, 2006 at 6:33 am

The Walker building seems to be a good candidate for a theatre restoration in Brooklyn.

RobertR
RobertR on June 6, 2006 at 6:11 am

They only tore the interior walls down that had been constructed for the quading, none of the theatre was ruined.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on June 6, 2006 at 4:50 am

The Walker was a quad when it finally closed in March, 1988. The last movies shown there were “Three Men and a Baby,” “Satisfaction,” “Shoot to Kill,” and “Scavenger,” according to an article published in The New York Times on March 30, 1988. By that time, interior demolition had already started. A B&W photo showed a heap of rubble on the auditorium floor.

jvc57
jvc57 on June 2, 2006 at 5:21 am

Yes it was a wonderfull theater. I remember the double features//Midnight movies/Italian movies and live entertainment//Closed circuit TV Ali And Frasier The Balcony…Roosevelt diner Davinci pizza cant remember the name of ice cream place on 18ave 69-70st next to cafe (part of cafe)it was a great place to grow up on the ave.
Also does anyone have any history about the Cotillian terrace 18ave 74-75st. I heard it was a theater with a parking area in basement????

ERD
ERD on January 18, 2006 at 7:08 am

As I said in my Oct.27th, Nov.8th & Nov.9th posts, some interested person or group should take an interest in trying to restore the Walker theatre. It is still intact, covered by a shell, and would be affordable. It is a more practicacle idea than trying to restore theatres in the borough that are too far gone. If I did not live so far now, I certainly would have tried to started something. A theatre like this should be preserved for this & future generations.

ERD
ERD on January 18, 2006 at 7:08 am

As I said in my Oct.27th, Nov.8th & Nov.9th posts, some interested person or group should take an interest in trying to restore the Walker theatre. It is still intact, covered by a shell, and would be affordable. It is a more practicacle idea than trying to restore theatres in the borough that are too far gone. If I did not live so far now, I certainly would have tried to started something. A theatre like this should be preserved for this & future generations.

LuisV
LuisV on January 18, 2006 at 6:45 am

Thanks ERD, (and Warren!)

It is truly beautiful and exciting to think that is might all still be there. But for how long?

ERD
ERD on January 17, 2006 at 5:55 am

LuisV, See Warren’s post of August 14, 2005 for an excellent picture of of the Walker’s auditorium before multiplexing.

LuisV
LuisV on January 17, 2006 at 5:38 am

I don’t suppose anyone has any pictures of this theater, inside or out? My curiosity has been piqued.

ERD
ERD on November 9, 2005 at 6:36 am

correction for the above post: Unlike other theatres that are closed, it is certainly finacally possible to restore.

ERD
ERD on November 9, 2005 at 4:58 am

I realize that the Walker is 100% intact, as Robert says in the above post. That is why I feel something should be done before years go by and it is too late. This beautiful theatre is a treasure for the boro of Brooklyn. It is something that should be done for future generations. As a performing arts center it could bring back some of the culture Brooklyn has lost. Unlike theatres, it is certainly financially possible.

RobertR
RobertR on November 8, 2005 at 4:29 pm

The Walker is 100% intact behind the retail walls. Remember it was all restored when they quaded it and then it was only used for a few years.

ERD
ERD on November 8, 2005 at 3:36 pm

The more I hear about the phenomenal costs it would take to restore former movie palaces in Brooklyn, the more convinced I am that the beautiful Walker should someday be considered before more alterations or eventual destruction takes place.

ERD
ERD on October 27, 2005 at 6:25 pm

A lot of people mention the restoration of Loew’s Kings, but I think it would be a great idea to try and restore the Walker. It was a beautiful theatre, and it would be more afforadable than many of the other closed movie palaces.. I now live very far from Brooklyn, so I can’t get involved in this idea. Perhaps someone living in Brooklyn who has strong feelings for the Walker can get a group together.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on September 3, 2005 at 6:35 am

The “It Ain’t Hay” booking was probably in the spring of 1943. Can anyone make out the title of the second feature? If the Walker played the same combos as the RKO circuit, it should have been “The Young Mr. Pitt,” a British-made historical drama, but the Walker’s management might have considered it too ponderous to appeal to A&C fans and replaced it with something else.

CelluloidHero2
CelluloidHero2 on September 2, 2005 at 12:01 pm

Here’s a link to the Brooklyn Library site with a photo of the Walker. Abbott & Costello’s “It’s Ain’t Hay” was the attraction.

Theaterat
Theaterat on August 22, 2005 at 8:51 am

Again warren, thanks for this excellent interior shot of the Walker. You are doing all of us theaterbuffs a great favor! Thank you.