Orpheum Theatre

1 Hamilton Place,
Boston, MA 02108

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Showing 26 - 50 of 140 comments

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on January 31, 2011 at 6:15 pm

Great photo Brad, and yes the vertical was quite nice, looks a lot like the vertical of the Loews Palace in Washington D.C.

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on January 31, 2011 at 11:30 am

That vertical sign is awesomely huge. Wonder when it was taken down?

Brad Smith
Brad Smith on January 31, 2011 at 11:24 am

Thank you, Ron. I apologize for posting the wrong photograph. I haven’t posted anything for a while and need to slow down and do it correctly. I haven’t found a way to correct or delete an error, so I’ll just re-submit the entry below.

This photograph of the Loew’s Orpheum Theratre was taken in 1931 by George Mann of the comedy dance team, Barto and Mann.

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on January 31, 2011 at 11:14 am

Did you link to the wrong photo by mistake? That photo is of the RKO Boston theatre, not the Orpheum.

Brad Smith
Brad Smith on January 31, 2011 at 11:10 am

This photograph of the Loew’s Orpheum Theratre was taken in 1931 by George Mann of the comedy dance team, Barto and Mann.

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on December 31, 2010 at 10:58 am

I went by the Aldo shoe store yesterday. It occupies the Washington Street entrance of the Orpheum. It appears to have been enlarged at some point recently (?)– it now looks much deeper than formerly. This means that the marble staircase going up to the theater, which was in back of the store’s former rear wall, has been removed, at least its lower end. The store’s exterior sign almost certainly uses the frame of the Orpheum marquee, while above it, now blank, is another sign perpendicular to the facade which dates to Aquarius Theater days.

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on November 27, 2010 at 2:26 pm

Several sources online say that Seven Brides for Seven Brothers had a 70mm re-release starting in 1968, but I can’t find any reference to a 70mm release of The Girl Can’t Help It

dick
dick on November 27, 2010 at 10:48 am

As a kid going to the orpheum was fun.. We lived in the suburbs and my mother did not drive. We would take the train from Scituate to South Station, go shopping and always have lunch somewhere. Then we would take in a movie. The 1st movie I remember seeing at the Orpheum was 7 Brides For 7 Brothers. This was not only a great movie but the Projection and the sound were both clear and crisp on that beautiful big Cinemascope screen. I remember also going there in the 70’s for a 70mm stereo sound re=release of 7 Brides and also a 70mm re-release of Fox’s The Girl Casn’t Help It. Probabloy the best rock movie 50’s music ever. Jayne Mansfield sure filled that big Cinemascope screen. I just read in the paper recently that they are going to invest several million into sprucing up this grand old dame. Hope it works.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on October 21, 2010 at 6:10 am

On this day in 1925, Loew’s Orpheum was presenting “The Tower of Lies,” starring Lon Chaney and Norma Shearer, with comedian Jack Wilson topping the vaudeville bill. Performances were continuous from 9:15am, with the last complete show starting at 10:30pm.

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on September 15, 2010 at 10:51 am

No, they don’t offer tours to the public. However, they have provided tours to groups such as the Theatre Historical Society, the Cinema Theatre Association; also, the League of Historic American Theatres toured the Orpheum, I think. I went on a couple of these; someone from the theater greeted the group upon arrival, spoke about the house’s history; then we were free to wander around on our own for 45 minutes or so. All of these tours were in the late-morning or early-afternoon.

ltmahoney
ltmahoney on September 15, 2010 at 6:56 am

anyone know if they offer tours? i’ve been there 100 times for shows, but would love to get into some nooks and crannies and take some photos.

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on September 5, 2010 at 6:02 pm

Thanks Ron.Thanks for your reply.

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on September 5, 2010 at 4:14 pm

See my message above dated Jun 28, 2005 at 3:12am: “The Orpheum is listed in the 1966 annual report of Loew’s Theatres, Inc., but not in the 1967 annual report.”

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on September 5, 2010 at 2:05 pm

This theatre was listed in the 1965 Loews Annual report,they must have closed or sold this theatre serveral years latter.

LeslieMidkiffDeBauche
LeslieMidkiffDeBauche on April 29, 2010 at 10:27 am

to RS

Thanks so much. This is very helpful. Leslie

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on April 29, 2010 at 10:21 am

to LMD- “Morriscope” were the movie shorts shown at the Orpheum when William Morris was the Mgr. See comment above on Dec 14, 2005 where there is a description of a 1909 program at the Orpheum. Since these movies were silient, I assume that “Morriscope Music” were short films of some sort which had a musical accompaniement by the pit orchestra. These movies in vaudeville houses of that era were used as “chasers” at the end of the program to encourage people to leave.

LeslieMidkiffDeBauche
LeslieMidkiffDeBauche on April 28, 2010 at 3:54 pm

On 19 April 1909 the program at 12th act at the Orpheum was listed as “Morriscope Music.” Can anyone help me with a description of what sort of entertainment this was?

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on September 4, 2009 at 11:10 am

The Boston Herald entertainment section today has a list of some upcoming music concerts in the Boston area for Sept and Oct., and there are 2 listed for the Orpheum for late-Sept. Someone told me that he heard that not a lick of work was done in the Orpheum this summer – no repairs and no refurbishment. I hope that’s not true.

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on May 14, 2009 at 11:21 am

The 1968 photo shows the Washington Street entrance. The theater was called the Aquarius then. I.J Fox to the right was a furrier which had been in that location for many years. (What a Politically-INcorrect business that is today!) Gilchrist’s dept. store occupied the corner location; its rear was in the bottom level of the old Boston Music Hall. Today, Gilchrist’s is The Corner mall.

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on May 14, 2009 at 7:03 am

The marquee in that photo advertises what appears to be a triple-bill concert on October 24, which was a Thursday in 1968:

KAREN WYMAN
HOLIDAYS
MICKEY FREEMAN

but I don’t know anything about these performers. Do any of you?

While the big vertical sign says ORPHEUM, a small sign to the left of and below the marquee says ‘aquarius’.

To the right of the theatre entrance is a store called “I.J. Fox”. To the left is Gilchrist’s Department Store.

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on May 7, 2009 at 10:39 am

The Boston Herald today says that Druker will spend about $1M this summer for repairs at the Orpheum which will include the washrooms, carpets, painting, and some of the seats. “Next Fall, I think the Orpheum will look much better” Don Law was quoted as saying in the article written by Donna Goodison. The deal for Don Law’s organization to take over Live Nation’s management contract for the theater should close sometime in the July-Sept quarter.

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on May 6, 2009 at 11:35 am

The Boston Herald story today, by Donna Goodison, says “Law said the Orpheum will undergo renovations this summer by owner Ronald Druker. ‘The discussion is ongoing, but my sense is that they will be significant’ Law said.” Let’s hope they do something to fix up the sleazy dump.

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on May 6, 2009 at 10:52 am

Whereas today’s Boston Globe article says:

“For consumers, the latest ownership change is unlikely to have a significant impact on the programming or ambiance of the three venues. Law said he does not anticipate making significant renovations to any of the facilities.”

Who to believe here?

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on May 6, 2009 at 10:49 am

According to today’s Boston Herald story about the transaction, the Orpheum is to close this summer for renovation work performed by its owner, the Drucker reality company. Concert promoter Don Law and his partner David Mugar purchased the operating contract for the Orpheum from Live Nation. Renovation work and just plain basic maintenance are long, long, long overdue at the Orpheum, for sure !

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on May 5, 2009 at 8:20 pm

The Boston Globe and Boston Herald websites both report that Live Nation has sold the Orpheum, the Opera House, and the Paradise Rock Club (in Allston) to the newly organized Boston Opera House Ventures LLC , owned by Don Law and David Mugar. Law is president of Live Nation New England, but his new company will operate separately from Live Nation, according to the Herald.

I hope Don Law and David Mugar invest some money into fixing up the Orpheum. Its current condition should make them embarrassed to own it.