Tivoli Theater

365 Fulton Street,
Brooklyn, NY 11201

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Showing 26 - 42 of 42 comments

jflundy
jflundy on June 22, 2007 at 7:37 pm

Here is a view from circa 1935 showing marquee from above.
http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/show?52027

jflundy
jflundy on June 22, 2007 at 7:33 pm

Here is an earlier photo showing previous marquee circa 1935.
http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/show?52026

jflundy
jflundy on June 22, 2007 at 7:31 pm

Sorry, here is link that was omitted from above posting.
http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/show?52024

jflundy
jflundy on June 22, 2007 at 7:28 pm

Here is a photo of the Tivoli Theater’s Fulton St main entrance in 1940. The marquee, new in 1938, can be seen to the left of the Fulton Street El tracks from the platform of the Boro Hall Station, taken probably on June 1, 1940, which was Unification Day. The last train left Fulton Ferry earlier that day at 12:01 AM for ENY when the City of New York took over operation of all BMT lines and abandoned the Fulton and 5th Avenue El lines.

PKoch
PKoch on September 18, 2006 at 8:53 am

Thank you, ken mc. The link to the 1954 photos are a help.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on September 16, 2006 at 1:08 pm

I don’t think the earlier links are working. Here is a 1954 photo of the Tivoli:
http://tinyurl.com/jdnvh

PKoch
PKoch on June 13, 2005 at 8:06 am

From “J.F. Lundy” :

“The Tivoli was located in downtown Brooklyn near Borough Hall. As has been stated by others, it was first known as Hyde & Behmans Theater with its entrance on Adams Street marked by a large vertical.

“The street pattern has been greatly altered since the early 1950’s in this part of Brooklyn. Back in the old days, Fulton Street ran westward to a point immediately beyond Adams Street where it veered northward past Borought Hall to Fulton Ferry. Adams Street ran northward from Fulton Street and intersected Myrtle Avenue one block north of Fulton.

“On the west side of Adams, three quarters of the way up the block from Fulton, was the original entrance to the theater. Immediately behind and to the south of the theater was the large Arbuckle Building situated on Fulton Street after it turned northward, facing Borough Hall Park.To the north of the Arbuckle building were several smaller multi storey buidings, all with store fronts housing various types of retail trade.

“In August of 1925 a sign went up on the third floor of one of these buidings about two stores north of the Arbuckle. It announced that the building would be remodeled to provide a new entrance for the Olympic Theater, formerly the Hyde & Behmans, to open on Labor Day. The theater would seat 2000 people. The building housed the Peterson Lunch Room with a "Formal Attire Clothing Rental” business on the second floor.

“This theater was later renamed the Tivoli. Century Circuit ran it in the 1940’s.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on August 18, 2004 at 12:03 pm

According to an old and unfortuntately undated newspaper clipping that I found in the NYPL, the original entrance of Hyde & Behman’s was on Adams Street, and that entrances were later added on Fulton Street and Myrtle Avenue.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on August 2, 2004 at 12:08 pm

Erwin, that seems to solve some of the mystery. But what street was the other entrance on? And is that the Tivoli’s auditorium to the left of the Schenley sign, or another theatre in the area? The Tivoli’s seating capacity was reported as 2,200 in the 1931 Film Daily Year Book, but reduced to 1,052 by the 1946 volume. I suspect that it was originally 2,200 as Hyde & Behman’s vaudeville theatre, and then reduced in seating capacity over the years as a subsequent-run movie house.

EMarkisch
EMarkisch on August 2, 2004 at 11:46 am

Warren…You are correct that the Tivoli must have had two entrances. A blowup of the marquee of the March 18th,‘54 photo reveals not the name of the double feature playing at the time but…NOW TWO HITS…BOX OFFICE OPEN AROUND THE CORNER ON FULTON STREET.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on August 2, 2004 at 10:29 am

Curiously, the two photos from March, 1954 don’t match up. In the long shot that includes the “Foamy” roof sign, a seven-story vintage building stands immediately to the right of the Tivoli’s entrance. But in the other photo, immediately to the right of the entrance is a low, two or three-story building with Greek or Roman columns and gabled windows in the top floor. Can anyone explain this disparity? Perhaps the Tivoli had a second entrance on another street?

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on August 2, 2004 at 9:30 am

The March 18, 1954 photo raises a question. Is that the Tivoli’s auditorium at the left, or part of another theatre in the area? If the Tivoli’s auditorium, it must have had a very long, narrow and low lobby leading from the Fulton Street entrance.

jflundy
jflundy on August 1, 2004 at 11:21 pm

Tivol1 viewed from steps of Brooklyn Boro Hall March 1954

Linkto Tivoli

jflundy
jflundy on August 1, 2004 at 11:12 pm

Tivoli Theater as it looked on March 18, 1954

linkto Tivoli

jflundy
jflundy on August 1, 2004 at 11:07 pm

A circa 1935 photo of the Tivoli which is behind the Fulton El in this link:
Here is a link to a photograph of the Tivoli Theatre.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on June 2, 2004 at 12:37 pm

The Tivoli was originally Hyde & Behman’s, one of the leading vaudeville theatres in America during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It was gradually overtaken by newer and more spectacular theatres in downtown Brooklyn, and finally converted to movies by the Century circuit as the Tivoli.

PeterKoch
PeterKoch on April 23, 2004 at 5:56 pm

The address of the Tivoli Theater in downtown Brooklyn NY is given as 365 Fulton St. at : www.cinematour.com, apparently where Fulton St. intersected Myrtle Avenue, when Fulton extended all the way north to the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge, (this north-south segment of what was once Fulton Street is now named Cadman Plaza)and also when Myrtle Avenue extended far west enough to intersect Fulton St. there, which it no longer does.

The western end of Myrtle Avenue was first moved east to Jay Street by the construction of NYCTA headquarters in the 1950’s, and further east in the 1990’s to Flatbush Avenue by the construction of the new MetroTech Center.

The Tivoli Theater appears in the middle photo on p. 47 of “Unifying The Subways” by Frederick A. Kramer. The view is apparently east on Myrtle Avenue from its intersection with Fulton St. The photo is of the Adams St. station of the BMT Brooklyn elevated, which crosses Myrtle Avenue and runs horizontally across the photo. The Tivoli appears at the extreme right of the photo. The marquee is an arc of a circle, concave to the front of the theater. On the portion facing directly across Myrtle Avenue one can read : AT 10 A.M. NEW SHOW TUES SAT. NITE. On the portion facing the point of view (camera) one can read : NOW SH[OWING] O DE HAVIL[AND] GOVERNMENTCHOS[EN ?]

The caption of this photo reads : “This view of the Adams Street station was taken looking east on Myrtle Avenue from Boro Hall.”