Comments from raybradley

Showing 526 - 550 of 726 comments

raybradley
raybradley commented about Redland Theater on Sep 6, 2007 at 8:25 pm

Within the Oklahoma Historical Society Archives are 1963 photos. See them by typing in word “redland”,
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raybradley
raybradley commented about Dunkin Theatre on Sep 6, 2007 at 7:44 pm

With that Beaux-Arts terra-cotta facade one wondered what the interior was like. Surprisingly auditorium detail did not contain the typical theatre look, but was fashioned to resemble a stately hotel ballroom. See for yourself by typing in word “theatre”,
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raybradley
raybradley commented about Paramount Theatre on Sep 6, 2007 at 7:38 pm

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At some point in time Paramount must have given their theatre an Art-Deco facelift. Above 1936 photos exhibit the original Spanish Colonial look. Type in word “paramount”,

raybradley
raybradley commented about Circle Cinema Theatre on Sep 3, 2007 at 8:16 am

Lost:
Some clues are visible in your photos. The Marquee has an “R” in the center, so don’t think this theatre would have been named Meta. Those two letters hanging on marquee left spell “EL” which indicate this was a Spanish language house (I wonder if Lamont has a large Latino community?). Ground floor walls are covered in pink/maroon tile. Griffith Bros. were well known for using cheap bathroom tile for “redecoration” purposes, so this could have been one of their movie houses.
Perhaps you should go ahead and post this cinema under the name “Lamont Cinema” until the actual name can be uncovered.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Murray Theatre on Sep 3, 2007 at 7:54 am

That mighty Wurtlitzer is visible in one of those 1939 auditorium views.

Oilman and Governor mentioned above by Rance was Ponca City resident William H. “Alfalfa Bill” Murray. Alfalfa Bill was a fabulously wealthy, rugged, take control type man who caused a nationwide scandal when he married his own adopted daughter. Fortunately for him, Mrs. Murray earned vindication for the newly weds when her beauty, wit, and charm won over the hearts of most everyone.
During the 1940s Mrs. Murray’s name again hit nationwide headlines when her sudden disappearance caused speculation of kidnapping. Several months later the former First Lady of Oklahoma was found living in quiet seclusion in a guest house on the grounds of a convent that had once been one of her mansion, an estate donated to the church by her husband.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Fort Supply Opera House on Sep 2, 2007 at 3:50 am

From Oklahoma Historical Society comes this clear shot. To view image type in words “opera house”,
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raybradley
raybradley commented about Grand Theatre on Sep 2, 2007 at 3:36 am

The earliest view found so far of this historic theatre can be seen on below site by typing in words “opera house',
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raybradley
raybradley commented about Inca Theatre on Sep 2, 2007 at 3:20 am

Of interest to you former Video dawgs, to see vintage photos of a great many Griffith Bros cinemas go to 08/07/07 post above web site and type in word “theatre”,
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Of special note is the Grand Opera House, San Marcos, TX. This was Griffith Bros very first theatre acquisition.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Yale Theater on Sep 2, 2007 at 2:49 am

Claremore, Oklahoma, is an interesting and picturesque place.
This was Will Rogers birth place, hometown, and where he is entombed.
Claremore is the setting for two succesful Broadway plays that were also made into Hollywood films; “OKLAHOMA!”, and “Dark at the Top of the Stairs”.
Oklahoma Military Academy is located here.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Rialto Theatre on Sep 2, 2007 at 2:46 am

Claremore, Oklahoma, is an interesting and picturesque place.
This is Will Rogers birth place, hometown, and where he is entombed.
Claremore is the setting for two Broadway plays that were also made into Hollywood films; “OKLAHOMA!”, and “Dark at the Top of the Stairs”.
Oklahoma Military Academy is located here.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Palace Theatre on Sep 2, 2007 at 2:43 am

Claremore, Oklahoma, is an interesting place.
This was Will Rogers birth place, hometown, and where he is entombed.
Claremore is the setting for two Broadway plays that were also made into Hollywood films; “OKLAHOMA!”, and “Dark at the Top of the Stairs”.
Oklahoma Military Academy is located here.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Rialto Theatre on Sep 1, 2007 at 3:34 pm

Antique interior/exterior images of these theatres can be seen by typing word “theatre”,
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raybradley
raybradley commented about Esquire Theatre on Sep 1, 2007 at 3:30 pm

To see interior/exterior vintage photos of the Chief, Esquire, and/or Palace type in word “theatre”,
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raybradley
raybradley commented about La Nora Theatre on Sep 1, 2007 at 1:36 pm

To view 1936 interior/exterior images of the La Nora type in word “theatre”,
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raybradley
raybradley commented about Granada Theatre on Sep 1, 2007 at 1:18 pm

To view 1930 photos of the Granada exterior and sky job auditorium type in word “theatre”,
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raybradley
raybradley commented about Howard Hodge Theater on Sep 1, 2007 at 12:54 pm

To see 1964 image type in word “theatre”,
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raybradley
raybradley commented about Mexia Theater on Sep 1, 2007 at 12:52 pm

To see vintage images type in word “theatre”,
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raybradley
raybradley commented about Morley Theatre on Sep 1, 2007 at 12:48 pm

SEE 1947 interior/exterior photos by typing in word “theatre”,
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raybradley
raybradley commented about Brauntex Theater on Sep 1, 2007 at 12:42 pm

View 1964 interior/exterior photos by typing in word “theatre”,
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raybradley
raybradley commented about Campus Theatre on Sep 1, 2007 at 12:31 pm

Actually the Campus Theatre design could be classified as International Moderne. It reminds me of a Worlds Fair pavilion!
Wonder if a prof from the School of Architecture created this little masterpiece?

raybradley
raybradley commented about Circle Cinema Theatre on Sep 1, 2007 at 11:56 am

On the above Oklahoma Historical Society web pages, that photo of a narrow, vaulted ceiling auditorium is actually an image of Cameo Theatre seating.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Rita Theatre on Sep 1, 2007 at 11:52 am

Oklahoma Historical Society web site remarks that the Cameo Theatre (a probable former nickelodeon) originally occupied this site. In 1940 Griffith Bros Theatres bought the Cameo and replaced it with the (cheaply built) Rita Theatre. Because of its blah appearance, when the Rita burned down most Tulsans felt no sense of loss.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Cameo Theater on Sep 1, 2007 at 11:45 am

Oklahoma Historical Society remarks that Griffith Bros acquired the Cameo Theatre in 1940, and then replaced it with the Rita Theatre.
1934 images reveal a Spanish Mission exterior (bet those entrance doors were composed of green & orange glass) that looked as if it probably dated way back to nickelodeon times. Tht original generic “movie house” auditorium wasn’t much to look at, but it sure was better than the cheap Griffith replacement.
On the OHS web site, the Cameo auditorium is mistakenly shown again as that of the Circle Theater.
Most Tulsa citizens felt no loss after the Rita Theatre burned.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Will Rogers Theatre on Sep 1, 2007 at 11:26 am

Vintage images illustrate interior motifs for the Will Rogers as decorated in unique Western Impressionist Styling.
These dull B&W photos cannot bring out how auditorium hues were rich earth tones, with splashes of bright colour thrown in here and there for dramatic effect. All together it created an exciting setting in which to view a movie.

raybradley
raybradley commented about Tulsa Theater on Sep 1, 2007 at 10:57 am

Seems that Oklahoma Historical Society is not too interested in documenting fact, as they remark that the Tulsa Theatre replaced the Main Street Cinema. Vintage images from other sources prove that these two theatres operated in compitition across the street from one another.
The eye pleasing interior motif of the Tulsa Theatre could best be described as Southwestern Moderne.