Comments from Joe Vogel

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Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Birkdale Stadium 16 on Sep 17, 2011 at 2:44 am

The Birkdale Stadium 16 was originally operated by the Eastern Federal circuit under the name Movies @ Birkdale. It opened in May, 2001, and was designed by the Charlotte, NC, architectural firm ADW Architects. The Eastern Federal chain was taken over by Regal in 2005.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about New Town Stadium 12 on Sep 17, 2011 at 2:41 am

The New Town Cinemas 12 was designed by the Charlotte, NC, architectural firm ADW Architects.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Commerce Center 18 on Sep 17, 2011 at 2:38 am

The Commerce Center 18 was designed by the Charlotte, NC, architectural firm ADW Architects.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Columbiana Grande Stadium Cinemas on Sep 17, 2011 at 2:36 am

The Columbiana Grande was designed by the Charlotte, NC, architectural firm ADW Architects.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about AMC Southpoint 17 on Sep 17, 2011 at 2:34 am

Southpoint Cinemas was designed by the Charlotte, NC, architectural firm ADW Architects.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Palladium Cinemas 14 on Sep 17, 2011 at 2:31 am

The Palladium Cinemas 14 was designed by the Charlotte, NC, architectural firm ADW Architects.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Ayrsley Grand Cinemas 14 on Sep 17, 2011 at 2:28 am

The Ayrsley Grand Cinemas 14 was designed by the Charlotte architectural firm ADW Architects.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Palace Grand Theatre on Sep 15, 2011 at 7:24 pm

A Glendale movie house called the Lincoln Theatre was mentioned in the June 2, 1928, issue of Exhibitor’s Herald & Moving Picture World, and Cinema Treasures contributor BillCounter found the Lincoln listed in a 1928 telephone directory with the address of 129 N. Brand. That would be one of the storefronts adjacent to the Palace Grand’s entrance, so Lincoln Theatre must have been a late AKA for the Palace Grand. The operators might have been using the storefront as an office for the theater.

I don’t know in what year the name Lincoln was adopted. The West Coast Theatres circuit was formed in 1920, and bought the holdings of the Turner, Dahnken and Langley circuit in 1923, by which time the Palace Grand was known as the TD&L Theatre. C. L. Langley continued with West Coast as a partner in several theaters in Glendale, Pasadena, and perhaps Orange County, and built the Alexander Theatre in Glendale in association with West Coast in 1925.

William Fox bought an interest in West Coast at least as early as 1925, and had taken control of the company by 1929. The name change from TD&L Theatre to Lincoln Theatre might have taken place during the West Coast period or during the Fox West Coast period.

It’s possible, and even likely, that Henry Jensen retained ownership of the Palace Grand building, and that Turner, Dahnken and Langley operated it under a lease. After building the Alexander, West Coast-Langley Theatres might have simply let their lease on the Palace Grand run out.

A staff report published by the City of Glendale, dated October 25, 2010, (Google cache here– see page 2) contains information I’m sure is wrong. It says:

“The Palace-Grand Shops, also known as Jensen’s Arcade, was completed in 1923 and featured a drugstore, jewelry shop, and post office, along with one of Glendale’s most cherished historic businesses, the Egyptian Village Café. The basement, called the Glendale Recreation Center, had a barber shop, billiards hall, and bowling alley. The Arcade was built on the site of an earlier Jensen development, the Palace Grand Theater, an early vaudeville and movie house that was built in 1914 but forced to close in 1920 due to competition from the more modern Glendale Theater.”
More likely, 1920 was the year the house was renamed the TD&L Theatre. This ca.1925 photo (previously linked in my first comment on this theater) shows the TD&L sign on the building, and next door is a two-storey building with what appears to be a large set of skylights covering much of the roof. That neighboring building must have been the Palace Grand Shops, AKA Jensen’s Arcade, built in 1923. It’s possible that, after the theater closed, probably in 1928, its building was incorporated into the arcade, but the theater was definitely in operation through most of the 1920s.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Star's Palace on Sep 15, 2011 at 6:52 pm

Thanks for the information on the Majestic, Bill. A card in the L.A. Library’s California Index says that the Majestic was designed by architect Paul V. Tuttle. (He also designed Glendale’s Carnegie Library, opened in 1914 and demolished in 1977.)

The L.A. County Assessor’s office lists a big lot at the northwest corner of Broadway and Maryland with three buildings on it, one of which was built in 1912, with an effective construction date of 1970. The other two date from 1921 and 1990, but all three have been remodeled to have a unified facade style. The 1912/1970 structure has 13,110 square feet. The Majestic’s building was 70x94 feet, according to the California Index entry, which would give it about 6,580 feet on each floor, or a bit over 13,000 square feet. The current address 115 E. Broadway is in that building, which, judging from Google’s satellite view, has a frontage of about 94 feet on Broadway and is about 70 feet deep. I’m pretty sure this is the Majestic’s building, still standing, but altered beyond recognition.

I think you must be right about the name Lincoln being an AKA for the Palace Grand. I’ll leave a comment on Cinema Treasures' Palace Grand page, noting this new AKA.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rialto Theatre on Sep 15, 2011 at 6:47 pm

Scott, you’ll probably be interested in three items mentioning Claude Langley in various 1916 issues of The Moving Picture World, available in this scan from Google Books. They name Langley as directing manager and treasurer of the Turner & Dahnken circuit, so his association with them clearly predates his partnership with them in the various Southern California theaters they operated.

(Note: Google Books has changed the way it functions, so to see all three of the magazine items mentioning Langley you’ll have to hit the “clear search” link, then re-enter the terms Turner Dahnken Langley in the search box and hit Go.)

A card in the California Index cites a January 29, 1923, item from the Glendale News Press which said that West Coast Theatres had bought the entire TD&L chain, so Langley’s association with West Coast began no later than that. An early 1923 article about the West Coast takeover in The Film Daily said that the TD&L circuit consisted of fourteen theaters, “…five theaters in Los Angeles, three in Pasadena, two in Glendale and one each in Huntington Park, Taft and several other towns.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Liberty Theatre on Sep 14, 2011 at 6:39 pm

I had thought that what was left of the building on the Liberty Theatre’s lot was to have been demolished as part of the LAPD’s new garage project, which now occupies most of this block, but Google Street View shows the garage completed, and the corner building is still there, too. The building no longer has a Main Street entrance, but a door has been punched in the side wall, with the address 103 E. 3rd Street.

The L.A. County Assessor’s office says that the building was built in 1910, with an effective construction date of 1926. As there’s a record of an organ being installed in the Liberty in 1907, it’s possible that the theater was destroyed within a couple of years of opening. It’s also possible that the assessor’s office is wrong about the original construction date, and that the building on this site now is indeed the remnant of the Liberty Theatre.

The building is currently occupied by a business called US Wholesale Outlet Inc., and the 3rd Street wall of the building sports an array of product logos from Newport Cigarettes, to Kodak, to Tylenol. I don’t know if just anybody can wander in off the street, but somebody in the area could give it a shot. I doubt if any trace of the Liberty’s interior decor remains in this building, assuming that it is the Liberty’s building, but the auditorium space itself would probably still be intact.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Star's Palace on Sep 14, 2011 at 3:31 am

The name on the theater’s marquee is “Beyond the Stars Palace.” Googling that full name you can find the theater’s official web site.

The Los Angeles County assessor’s office gives the construction date of the building on this parcel as 1938.

BillCounter: If you still have access to any old Glendale city directories, could you look up two theaters that appear to be missing from the Cinema Treasures database? There was a Lincoln Theatre, mentioned in Exhibitor’s Herald & Moving Picture World of June 2, 1928, and the Majestic Theatre, which was to be opened on February 3, 1912, according to the January 21, 1912, issue of the Glendale News. The Majestic was located on 4th Street (since renamed Broadway) east of Brand.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Granada Theatre on Sep 14, 2011 at 3:29 am

This theater was designed for the Excelsior Amusement Company by architect G. Albert Lansburgh. It was mentioned in several issues of Building and Engineering News in 1921.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Temple Theatre on Sep 14, 2011 at 3:25 am

The Southwest Builder & Contractor article I cited as the source for the architect’s name misspelled it. The correct name of the architect was Harry C. Deckbar. Among his other works was Trinity Auditorium in downtown Los Angeles, designed when he was a partner in the firm of Fitzhugh, Krucker & Deckbar.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Indiana Theatre on Sep 13, 2011 at 5:48 am

Here is a newspaper ad for the reopening of the former Victory Theatre as the Indiana, in the September 11, 1926, issue of The Kokomo Daily Tribune. The Indiana opened on September 12.

The January 21, 1920, issue of the same publication said that the Victory Theatre was scheduled to open on February 2.

The address currently given for this theater must be wrong. This article gives the location of the Victory/Indiana Theatre as the southeast corner of Main and Taylor. Odd numbers are on the west sides of streets in Kokomo, so the theater must have had an even street number.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Wood Theatre on Sep 13, 2011 at 5:02 am

This page has a photo of the Wood Theatre, and says that it closed in 1953. Google Street View shows that the building is still standing.

Here is an ad for opening night, in the April 13, 1925, issue of the Kokomo Daily Tribune. The theater opened the following night.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theatre on Sep 12, 2011 at 6:32 pm

I’ve also come across a reference to an Ohio Theatre and a State Theatre operating in Barnesville in the late 1940s. They were operated by an Edward J. Modie. I don’t think the spelling of the name was a typo, as I’ve found other references to an Edward Modie living in Barnesville from the 1930s, and a 2010 item in the Barnesville Enterprise mentions the Modie family in connection with the theater business in the town. Edward Modi must have Anglicized the spelling of his surname at some point.

The 2010 article also says that the building at 145 W. Main Street was the original home of the Ohio Theatre, and later became a bank and then a thrift store. If the Modi Theatre was a 137 W. Main, the two must have been nearly neighbors- unless there’s been an address mixup, and the Modi and the Ohio were the same theater.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theatre on Sep 12, 2011 at 5:31 pm

Someone named Joseph Modi was listed as the operator of a 500-seat house in Barnesville called the Acme Strand Theatre in the supplement to the 1922 edition of The Julius Cahn-Gus Hill Theatrical Guide and Moving Picture Directory. It must have been the predecessor of the Modi Theatre.

An Edward Joseph Modi and a Paul Gregory Modi were both listed in a 1921 directory of students at Ohio State University. A 1925 publication about former Ohio State students mentions P. G. Modi as manager of a popular movie theater at Barnesville. I would surmise that these two were Joseph Modi’s sons. If he could put two sons through college in the early 1920s, he must have been fairly prosperous.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Roxy Theatre on Sep 12, 2011 at 4:48 pm

The theater in the photo is still in operation as the Cameo Cinema, and is in the Napa County town of St. Helena.

Helena, California, is a tiny hamlet in Trinity County, and has no theaters.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Grand Opera House on Sep 12, 2011 at 4:06 pm

The April 30, 1910, issue of The American Contractor said that the Dubuque Opera House was to be remodeled. The architects for the $70,000 project were C.W. and G.L. Rapp.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Sugg Theatre on Sep 12, 2011 at 4:03 pm

When J.D. Sugg died in 1925, the Waurika News-Democrat published an article noting some of the bequests made in his will. Among them was a bequest “…to MRS. BELL MCCOWN of Fort Worth, a niece and her children, the Sugg Theatre building in Chickasha and $5,000 each….”

There was also a reference to another theater in Chickasha that Mr. Sugg owned: “The Kozy Theatre building in Chickasha goes to J. D. LINDSAY of that city for life, reverting to the estate on his death.”

Either the Kozy is not yet listed at Cinema Treasures, or is listed under another name and is missing the aka. The Kozy was mentioned in the July 29, 1916, issue of The Moving Picture World, so it was at least that old.

I think it’s possible that the building currently on the site of the Sugg Theatre incorporates the lower portions of the theater’s side and back walls. Brick is pretty good at surviving fires. But as the theater had both a balcony and a gallery, and the current building is a single floor structure, the upper parts of the walls at least have clearly been demolished. The front is obviously post-fire construction, as it is mostly glass show windows.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Halsey Theatre on Sep 10, 2011 at 6:11 pm

Two interior photos of the Halsey Theatre appear on page 39 of the January, 1913, issue of the trade journal Architecture and Building.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Broadway Theatre on Sep 10, 2011 at 5:27 pm

The June 12, 1909, issue of The Moving Picture World said that the Broadway Theatre in Everett had changed hands. N. Parentin and G. W. Vaughan had sold their interests in the house to C. F. Rollins, who planned to make improvements.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Illinois Theatre on Sep 10, 2011 at 4:41 pm

Google Maps puts its pin at the corner of 2nd Avenue and 17th Street. The Illinois Theatre was actually a block west, at the southeast corner of 2nd Avenue and 16th Street. Street View has been set to the proper location. The theater was in the three-story building diagonally across the intersection.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Nevada Theatre on Sep 10, 2011 at 12:19 am

The 1912-1913 Cahn guide follows its listing of the Nevada Theatre at Nevada City with the addition of “Broadway Theatre—Pictures.” During that period, the guide usually listed movie houses at the end of the entries for a given city, following the town’s stage houses. At least in 1912, there must have been both a Nevada Theatre and a Broadway Theatre in Nevada City.

I don’t know if there was a relationship to the Broadway Theatre at 409 Broad Street listed in the FDYs in the 1940s and early 1950s. Is it possible that Broadway Theatre was never an aka for the Nevada/Cedar Theatre? 409 Broad would have been a few doors up the hill from the Nevada Theatre. The buildings on that site now look like old houses converted to shops, but they could be newer construction in a vintage style.