Comments from Joe Vogel

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Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Franklin Theater on Apr 29, 2012 at 1:26 pm

Here is a fresh link to the Boxoffice item kencmcintyre linked to earlier. The item is about the outcome of an obscenity trial involving the theater’s manager.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Mann's Hastings Ranch 3 on Apr 29, 2012 at 1:03 pm

I went to this little triplex once, in 1975. I believe they were running a double feature of The Wind and the Lion and the remake of Farewell, My Lovely with Robert Mitchum. The auditorium was small, but a step above the AMC shoeboxes of the time.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theatre on Apr 29, 2012 at 12:43 pm

The Canada page of world-theatres.com says this about the Strand in Hamilton: “HAMILTON, ON – Strand Theatre – 761 King St. E – film theatre – 1930 – 558 seats – closed 1970”

The opening year appears to be wrong, though. The Strand Theatre is already listed at 761 King Street East in the 1922 Hamilton City Directory. Perhaps the house was rebuilt in 1929-1930?

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Peninsula Community Theatre on Apr 26, 2012 at 5:36 pm

Several articles and reader letters about the Village Theatre and its operators, the Gordon family, were published in the local newspaper over the years, and its web site, dailypress.com, has an assortment of them conveniently linked on this web page.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Wythe Cinema on Apr 26, 2012 at 5:07 pm

The caption of the fourth thumbnail photo on this web page (click the “-Businesses-” link) says that the Wythe Theatre opened on October 6, 1939.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Wythe Cinema on Apr 26, 2012 at 4:55 pm

This house was a very early shopping center theater. Groceteria.com member carolinatraveler posted this entry on one of the site’s message boards with the following information:

“…the developers of Wythe Shopping Center…opened their center in, as best as I can determine, early 1938. It opened with the Wythe Pharmacy, Wythe Theater, a beauty shop, Fields 5 & 10, and several other small stores….”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Astro Theatre on Apr 24, 2012 at 4:55 pm

An article about theater entrances, written by Helen Kent, appeared in Boxoffice of November 16, 1935, and it was illustrated by a pair of small before-and-after photos of the recently remodeled Rialto Theatre in St. Joseph.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Hamilton Movie Theater on Apr 24, 2012 at 3:10 pm

This house was called the State Theatre until at least 1950. Prior to becoming the State, it was showing movies as Smalley’s Theatre from about 1918, according to an article in the Hamilton & Morrisville Tribune of May 10, 2006. The Schine circuit took over the house about 1934.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Campbell's Empire Theatre on Apr 24, 2012 at 3:11 am

Landmarks of Wayne county and Detroit, by Robert Budd Ross and George Byron Catlin, published in 1898, had this to say about Campbell’s Empire Theater:

“The Empire Theatre, on the south side of Lafayette avenue, between Griswold and Shelby streets, was built by Dr. M. Campbell and opened on Christmas day, 1893. "The Kentucky Girl,” with Sadie Harrison in the principal role, was the first performance. When the Detroit Opera House burned on October 7, 1897, it was leased by Brady & Stair, and the high priced companies who formerly played at the Detroit Opera House were transferred there until the latter house was rebuilt.“
I noticed that in the photo CSWalczak linked to, the upper wall has the year 1887 carved into it. I don’t know how that can be reconciled with the claim in the book I linked to that it opened in 1893, unless it took Dr. Campbell six years to get the building built.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Victoria Theatre on Apr 20, 2012 at 6:01 pm

The historic photos from the Dayton library that were linked in earlier comments have all been moved to new URLs.

Here is the original Turner’s Opera House of 1864.

Here is the photo of the ruins of the Opera House after the 1869 fire.

Here is the pre-1918 fire photo of the Music Hall.

Here is the Victory Theatre after it was rebuilt in 1919.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about RKO State Theatre on Apr 20, 2012 at 6:00 pm

The URL of the photo lostmemory linked to in the previous comment has been changed. The photo is now at this link.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Main Theatre on Apr 20, 2012 at 4:23 pm

Internet says that Henkels & McCoy is a Pennsylvania-based engineering and construction firm specializing in projects for the energy, water, and communications industries. There’s no indication of what they are using the Main Theatre building for. It might be anything from branch offices to an equipment storage facility.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Alexandria Area Arts Association Theatre on Apr 20, 2012 at 4:23 am

Here is an interior photo showing the Andria Theatre’s main auditorium.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Avalon Theater on Apr 20, 2012 at 4:01 am

A thesis by Lisa Kalhar Melton identifies the Columbia Theatre as the work of architect Herman Preusse. As the theater was built in 1906, it falls into the period when Preusse was working in partnership with architect Julius Zittel.

Working on his own, Preusse also designed the Auditorium, Spokane’s first large theater, built in 1890. That same year he designed the Woodward Building, which, from 1911 to 1914, housed on its ground floor an early movie house called the Isis Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Potlatch Theater on Apr 20, 2012 at 3:31 am

Potlatch, Idaho, was founded in 1905 by the Potlatch Corporation, a large lumber company. As a company town, Potlatch was fitted out with an array of public facilities, including an opera house. The opera house burned in 1917, according to one source, and was replaced by a house called the People’s Theatre. It’s possible that the People’s Theatre was the same house that became the Potlatch Theatre, but I’ve been unable to confirm this. I’m inclined to think that it was, though, as Potlatch was never very large, and its population has been diminishing for several decades. It’s unlikely that a new theater would have been built in the post-war period.

The original opera house had been designed by a Spokane architect named C. Ferris White, who designed virtually all of the early buildings in the city, but I’ve been unable to discover if he was still the company’s architect in the late 1910s, when the new theater would have been built. White practiced in Spokane as late as 1922, so it is possible that he designed the People’s Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Downtown Theatre on Apr 19, 2012 at 3:37 pm

Downtown Newport News, by William A. Fox (Google Books preview), gives a brief history of this house. It was in operation as the Olympic Theatre prior to 1931, when it was taken over by Publix, remodeled, and renamed the James Theatre. Publix operated the house only until 1934, when it was taken over by the local chain Dominion Theatres. At some point it was renamed the Downtown Theatre. In its last days it showed adult movies, and was closed in 1978. The roof of the theater collapsed on January 12, 1983, leading to its demolition.

The caption of this historic photo from the Newport News Public Library says that the Olympic Theatre was built in 1911. I found a period source indicating that the house was in operation by December of that year.

The Library of Virginia’s weblog, Out of the Box, has an interesting item about a performance that took place at the Olympic Theatre in 1912, leading to the arrest of the theater manager and a dance troupe. That younger generation! What was the world coming to?

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Marlow's Theater on Apr 18, 2012 at 3:49 am

Theater operator James Marlow is the subject of this article from the Murphysboro American of July 25, 2011. The article says that the Hippodrome/Marlow’s Theatre operated from 1919 until 1968.

An item in the October 23, 1973, issue of the Southern Illinoisan newspaper says that Marlow’s Theatre was demolished in 1969 to make way for a bank’s parking lot.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theater on Apr 18, 2012 at 12:51 am

The photos in the weblog post I linked to in me previous comment show that Street View on this page is currently set to the wrong building. The theater was in the building down the block to the left which has a sign reading “Alamo Shooters” on what remains of the marquee. The building has the addresses 108 and 110 E. San Antonio Avenue.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theater on Apr 18, 2012 at 12:45 am

The Wigwam Theater was in operation by 1914, when it was one of five El Paso movie houses that shared a full-page ad in the August 29 issue of the El Paso Herald.

This post from weblog Deep Inside El Paso has a couple of photos of the Wigwam/State Theatre building (way down the page) and cites historian Cynthia Farah Haines as saying that the Wigwam Theatre was renamed the Rialto in 1921, then went back to Wigwam in 1922, and became the State in 1949. Haines also said that the Wigwam Theatre was designed by architect Henry Trost. The State began showing X-rated movies in 1981, but closed later that year.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Center 3 Cinemas on Apr 16, 2012 at 3:40 pm

The Center Theatre can be seen in its original, single-screen configuration in four photos in Boxoffice, May 17, 1965.

The Center was originally operated by Lockwood and Gordon Enterprises, who also operated the Cinerama Theatre on University Avenue.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Eaton Theatre on Apr 14, 2012 at 5:24 am

Given the 1931 opening, it is likely that the Eaton Theatre is the proposed house mentioned in the June 1, 1930, issue of The film Daily:

“Charlotte, Mich. — Work on the theater planned here is expected to start next month, according to R. V. Day, of St. Johns, architect.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Golden Husk on Apr 14, 2012 at 5:02 am

Given the Art Deco touches on the facade, this theater is probably the planned house mentioned in the June 1, 1930, issue of The Film Daily

“Ord, Neb.— A $30,000 theater seating 500 is to be built here by M. Blemond, of the Liberty, Loup City. Work will be started on June 20.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lafayette Theatre on Apr 14, 2012 at 2:46 am

The Architecture of Jefferson Country: Charlottesville and Albemarle County, Virginia, by K. Edward Lay, says that the Lafayette Theatre was built in 1921, specifically as a movie house. The book gives no details about it.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lafayette Theatre on Apr 14, 2012 at 2:24 am

An article about the Jefferson Theatre mentioned that the Lafayette Theatre was on the site now occupied by a shopping arcade called York Place, which is at 112 W. Main Street, so that was probably the theater’s address as well.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lafayette Theatre on Apr 14, 2012 at 2:16 am

A slightly better view of the Lafayette Theatre can be seen in this 1952 photo from The Charlottesville Dogwood Festival, by Elizabeth D. Wood Smith.