Virginia Theatre

Boardwalk and Virginia Avenue,
Atlantic City, NJ 08401

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Showing 51 - 55 of 55 comments

Mikeoaklandpark
Mikeoaklandpark on January 20, 2005 at 8:55 am

Oliver opened May 29th at the Shore theater in 35mm and Funny Girl opened May 23 at the Center in 70mm. The Shore, Hollywood, Center and the Charles (For The Lion In Winter), the Apollo (Last Tango In Paris) were roadshow engagements.I saw Hello Dolly in 1970 and the theater was in decent shape. Geogre Hamid operated all these theaters along with the Roxy. The Virgina did not have curtains or masking which was very strange for a roadshow house.I would also be interested in where some of the other roadshow films played. I do know My Faur Lady played non roadshow at the Margate. I agree the Roxy would have made a much better theater for roadshow engagements.

VincentParisi
VincentParisi on January 20, 2005 at 8:38 am

I’m surprised that a major city like Atlantic City was not showing 70mm at this time. But the films that you mentioned by the time they would have played there would have already proved to be flops(including Dolly in 35mm at the Virgina. Had it been a success it would I assume been shown there in Todd AO.) I assumed the Virgina would play its films like SOM and GWTW in 70mm.
Surely 2001 before it played at the Apollo it played somewhere in 70mm?
I remember in the summer of 68 the Apollo playing films like the Odd Couple and Where Were You When the Lights Went Out. A couple of years later it was showing Shaft and a few after that porn.
Was Funny Girl or Oliver at the Virginia in 69?

Cinedelphia
Cinedelphia on January 20, 2005 at 7:45 am

My frame of reference with the theatres in Atlantic City only goes back as far as the early to mid 60’s but as I can remember the following theatres besides the Virginia had roadshow or reserved seat engagements at one time or another. The Hollywood – “The Sand Pebbles”, “Dr. Doolittle”, and “Star”. The Center – “The Blue Max”.
To my recollection, none of these films were presented in 70mm.
(The only one’s that were actually shot in 70mm were “Dr. Doolittle"
and "Star”, “The Blue Max” and “The Sand Pebbles” were anamorphic scope blown up to 70mm for some venues). “Patton” played at the
Shore Theatre at regular admission prices (scope print, not D-150)

and “2001: A Space Odyssey” played at the Apollo at “popular admission price” (I’m also suspecting a scope reduction also). I have no recollection of Todd-AO 70 or Cinerama presentations, although I have heard that the Warner Theatre (which had been closed before I had the opportunity to see a film there)showed “Windjammer” in the three projector Cine Miracle process, but without stereo sound.

VincentParisi
VincentParisi on January 19, 2005 at 1:17 pm

Did Atlantic City have other roadshow houses? For instance where did the Todd AO and Cinerama films play? Also where was My Fair Lady when SOM was at the Virginia? I remember as a boy walking by in the summer of ‘68 when GWTW was there. A large sign for Millie stood above the theater which probably had played there the summer before.
I’m disappointed that it was shabby inside. I had always imagined that it was a deluxe roadshow house. In in the summer of 71 Klute played there while window cards announced Song of Norway which I assume had had a very disappointing run.

Cinedelphia
Cinedelphia on January 19, 2005 at 12:05 pm

I remember seeing two films at the Virginia, “It’s A Mad Mad Mad Mad
World” and “Krakatoa East of Java”. I could not have been more than
6 yrs old when I saw “It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World” so I don’t recall much of what the theatre was like at the time (early 60’s).
I do recall when I saw “Krakatowa East of Java” that the theatre was in pretty shabby condition by then. The stereo sound was impressive,
but the screen (which had an odd curve in the middle)and auditorium
were a bit smaller than I would have expected for a roadshow house. I
always have wondered why The Roxy,the other big boardwalk house operated by George Hamid (he also ran the Virginia) was not set up
for 70mm / stereopohnic roadshows instead. The Roxy was a much larger theatre with a balcony, huge Cinemascope screen, mezzanine
and all the trappings of a classic movie palace.