Nova Theatre

3589 Broadway,
New York, NY 10031

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Showing 51 - 75 of 86 comments

Ace
Ace on October 24, 2006 at 6:58 am

Alvarez, I wrote to you a couple days back. Hope you got it.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on October 20, 2006 at 6:16 am

Ace, I have the book and can send you a scan if you write to me at:

Ace
Ace on October 20, 2006 at 5:57 am

Wow, I’d really like to see a scan of that photo if you guys get your hands on the book.

Looking at the photo of the Nova at the top of the page, I also wonder if that was the facade’s original paint scheme. I bet it was (considering the New Coliseum has never been painted) and the new proprietors painting the facade entirely tan only added insult to injury.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on October 19, 2006 at 11:19 am

I think you’re right, Joe. In the photo there is a vertical sign affixed to the center portion of the facade which featured a large and fanciful oval caricature of a rabbit to compliment the two carved bunnies found at either end of the upper facade.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on October 19, 2006 at 10:50 am

Ace: I can’t recall for certain, and I don’t have access to my books right now so I can’t check, but I think there was a period photo of Manhattan’s Bunny Theatre in David Naylor’s “American Picture Palaces.” Maybe somebody reading this who has the book at hand can check it and respond. I do know I’ve seen a photo of this theatre in one book or another, and Naylor’s book is the most likely.

Bway
Bway on October 17, 2006 at 3:48 pm

Here’s a current view of the Bunny/Nova Theater, scroll down about ¾ of the page:

View link

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on October 17, 2006 at 6:30 am

Ace, I can confirm that it was still operating as the Bunny (and Bunny Roof) well into the thirties. By the late forties and early fifties it was known as the Dorset.

The sixties and seventies remain a mystery to me but by 1981 it was already the Nova and it became a twin around 1989-1990.

ejmurphyii
ejmurphyii on March 23, 2006 at 3:37 pm

My father’s uncle is listed in the NY City Directory as manager of the Bunny Theater in 1920-21. He later managed the Endicott Theater in Brooklyn. I’m looking for whatever information I can find on him and these places.

br91975
br91975 on February 14, 2005 at 10:23 pm

I’d been hoping to hear from someone who had ties in one way or another to the Nova. (See my post from this past September 2nd.) Even though I never saw a film at the Nova, I was saddened when it closed – to think a movie theatre could last 89 years and then, in a matter of months, just disappear into the streetscape and become just another 99-cent store… what a shame. When did your father work there, Lissy? Are there any memories he’d be willing to share?

Lissy
Lissy on February 14, 2005 at 9:50 pm

My dad managed this movie theatre also. Mr. Nova had 4 theatres that I know of, The Alpine, The Nova, The Riverdale Twin and finally the Colliseum. My dad worked at all 3.

br91975
br91975 on February 3, 2005 at 7:21 pm

Thanks for answering my questions; I’d long wondered about those booking and advertising policies and it’s great to finally have some clearance. Again, thank you…

cinemaservices
cinemaservices on February 3, 2005 at 6:10 pm

Newspaper ads that list all theatres in the area showing that movie are called co-op ads. Theatres have to pay to be placed in these ads. We had an average of $9,000 a week to be placed an ad for Friday-Sunday.
This is why many owners be placed in the time clock which is free in most papers.

cinemaservices
cinemaservices on February 3, 2005 at 6:09 pm

An agreement is made with all studios for first run and second run along with the contracts you get when you first open. I operate several theaters one is a twin and we have “Racing Stripes”. Warner states that when we got the picture when hade to keep it four weeks. We got the movie January 14th on the National
Release date. We could not split the movie for the first three weeks. This Friday it will show with a split with “National Treasure” which we are bringing back for one showing nightly. ”Racing Stripes “ will still show twice on weekdays and three times this weekend.

cinemaservices
cinemaservices on February 3, 2005 at 6:05 pm

An agreement is made with all studios for first run and second run cinemas.
Along with the contracts you get when you first open. I operate several theaters one is a twin and we have “Racing Stripes”. Warner states that when we got the picture we hade to keep it for at least four weeks.
We got the movie January 14th on the National
Release date. We could not split the movie for the first three weeks. This Friday it will show with a split with “National Treasure” which we are bringing back for one showing nightly. “Racing Stripes” will still show twice on weekdays and three times this weekend.

br91975
br91975 on February 3, 2005 at 4:08 pm

Actually, sorry, that was THREE questions; thanks in advance for your answers (or those of someone else of equal reliability)…

br91975
br91975 on February 3, 2005 at 4:07 pm

There are two other film booking questions I have, Robert, that perhaps you (or someone else in the know) can answer for me:

1) Is there a standard length of engagement agreement between the major studios for all their releases and the exhibitors or is it negotiated on a per-film basis?

2) Prior to a film’s release, can an exhibition agreement be broken? I’ve noticed the theatres a film is scheduled to open in vary sometimes from what’s listed within advance-release print ads and the theatres in which it actually opens. One recent example involves ‘Coach Carter’ and ‘Racing Stripes’, both of which were scheduled to open at the New York Twin; ‘Racing Stripes’, though, opened at the 64th & 2nd/Gemini instead…

3) Sunday newspaper print ads, specifically those which run in the NY Times, Post, and Daily News, don’t always list every Manhattan theatre in which the film opens – commonly, the Nova was left off and the New Coliseum continues to be with regularity. Any idea why this tends to be so?

cinemaservices
cinemaservices on February 2, 2005 at 8:15 pm

Robert that is very true Kent is a triplex but often “shows
4 movies” playing on the recording at 12,220,440,7,930 a few weeks back and even around the first week or so of December they listed 5 movies.Coliseum sometimes has six movies playing at or around the same time (8:45,9:10,9:15,9:25,9:40).

br91975
br91975 on February 2, 2005 at 8:14 pm

A long-standing personal mystery solved; thanks for that bit of info, Robert. I’m surprised none of the distributors have caught on; it’s probably safe to say they pay more concern to the venues their films show in on, say, the UWS of Manhattan than they do of the ones in Washington Heights or Corona.

RobertR
RobertR on February 2, 2005 at 7:01 pm

Thats done on purpose so they can double book films onto one screen. Many of these are in the first few weeks and the distributor would never allow the screen to be split. In addition to the papers being wrong they give they wrong times on the tape so if anyone checks they can say that particular movie is playing alone. This causes people to show up at the theatres furious. It’s worth it though to give out a few free passes to be able to not have to pass on a film on it’s opening week because your stuck with the 5th week of a commitment on an ongoing film. Check out the Kent in brooklyn during peak release times they will have 5 movies advertised all with times like 130 330 530 730 930.

br91975
br91975 on February 2, 2005 at 6:14 pm

Newspaper display ads and general movie clocks for Creative Entertainment-booked theatres (as was true with the Nova) often provide inaccurate information, listing more showtimes than a given theatre can support (i.e., four full showtime runs for a three-screen venue) or a showtime schedule on one or more screens which doesn’t jibe with running times.

br91975
br91975 on February 2, 2005 at 6:07 pm

The Nova was converted into a three-screen venue in the early to mid-‘90s and closed as such.

cinemaservices
cinemaservices on February 2, 2005 at 5:21 pm

About midway through the 1985 film “Death Wish 3” a delivery truck drives by the Nova Cinemas. The film must have been shot sometime in 1984 most likely summer; anyway “Beverly Hills Cop” is one of the movies advertised on the marquee. The Nova at this time must have been a twin because only two movies were on the marquee.

br91975
br91975 on October 19, 2004 at 1:27 am

‘Spy Kids 2’, ‘Undisputed’, and ‘XXX’ were the final offerings at the Nova – which became a triplex sometime in the early ‘90s – in August of 2002.

RobertR
RobertR on October 18, 2004 at 4:55 am

1989 films
5/19 1- Fistfighter 2- See No Evil
6/2 2- Renegades 2- See No Evil
6/16 1- No Holes Barred 2- See No Evil & Renegades
6/23 1 & 2 Batman
7/7 1- Lethal Weapon II 2- Batman
8/11 1- Lethal Weapon II 2- Nightmare on Elm Street V
8/18 1- Casualties of War 2- Nightmare V
8/25 1- Casualties of War 2- Millenium
9/1 1- License to Kill & Casualties of War 2- Lockup & Do Right Thing
9/8 1- The Abyss 2- Casualties of War & License to Kill
9/15 1- Casualties of War 2- Kickboxer
9/22 1- Black Rain 2- Kickboxer
9/29 1- Black Rain 2- Kickboxer & War Party
10/13 1- Black Rain 2- Halloween V
10/20 1- Look Who’s Talking 2- Black Rain & The Package
10/27 1- Look Who’s Talking 2- Shocker
11/10 1- Best of the Best & Shocker 2- Look Who’s Talking
11/17 1- Harlem Nights 2- Look Who’s Talking
11/24 1- Harlem Nights 2- Back To The Future 2
1/12/90 1- Downtown 2- Texas Chainsaw Massacre III
1/19 1- Tremors 2- Downtown & Texas Chainsaw 3
1/26 1- Tango & Cash 2- Little Mermaid & Tremors
2/16 1- Nightbreed 2- Hard to Kill

br91975
br91975 on September 28, 2004 at 3:35 pm

Thanks for your response to my September 2nd post, Robert – just out of curiosity, where was the Astro located?