Comments from Backseater

Showing 51 - 75 of 99 comments

Backseater
Backseater commented about Horseshoe Drive-In on Oct 9, 2005 at 4:49 pm

I’m living in Dallas now, but still have relatives in Ballinger and go there on occasion. My mother grew up there and her youngest brother and his 4 kids and their families (and dogs and cats) are still there. Drop me a line if you like at Best wishes.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Old Daisy Theatre on Oct 9, 2005 at 4:06 pm

I never went to either Daisy, but remember going to the Orpheum (then the Malco) in the early 1960s, and looking up Beale from Main and marvelling at the incredible level of activity. Much later in the late 1970s on Sunday mornings I would go biking in the area, and after my ritual “Circumnavigation of the Orpheum” would ride up Beale to the bus garage and then over to Central/Peabody and back East to the MSU area. I must have gone up Beale St. dozens of times while they were renovating it, so it was like watching the renovation in time-lapse. For most of the buildings, they propped up the facades and then tore down and rebuilt the buildings behind them. I think both Daisys (and maybe also the famous Schwab’s Drug Store) were spared this indignity and just conventionaly renovated, but I could be wrong. There was a modern 3-or 4-plex in the area at that time called the Muhammad Ali Cinema, said to be at least partially owned or backed by Mr. Ali himself. I don’t remember exactly where it was, but I did go there once to see “Take a Hard Ride,” an African-American-oriented Italian western with Jim Brown, Jim Kelly, and Fred Williamson—not to mention Dana Andrews, Lee Van Cleef, Catherine Spaak, and Barry Sullivan. I saw the cast list in the newspaper ad and said, “This I’ve got to see!” As I recall it, everybody was very cordial. Best wishes.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Loew's Palace Theatre on Oct 7, 2005 at 8:02 pm

Along with many other shows over the years (as usual), I saw Clint Eastwood in “Fistful of Dollars” and “For a Few Dollars More” both first-run at the Palace in 1967. All 3 of the Sergio Leone “Man With No Name” classics were released in the US in 67, though the first two were shown in Europe earlier. “Fistful” played the Palace in January or February and “More” was in May, right in the middle of final exam week at Southwestern (AKA “Rhodes College”). I had been studying very hard all week (yeah, right…) and just couldn’t look at another higher mathematics book, so I went to the Palace to mellow out with Clint. Imagine my surprise on encountering an SW classmate in the lobby, scheduled for the same exam the next day. He said that there were several other SW/future Rhodes scholars mellowing out at the Palace that evening, including the prof who was giving the test—but who was perhaps understandably not as concerned about it as we were. Later I learned that this was an alternate interpretation of the phrase “cram for a test”: at a certain point, you just say “cram it” and go to a movie. Anyway I passed the final, graduated, and went off to the Air Force—and then about five months later as a shavetail completed the trilogy by seeing “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” at the magnificent Aztec theater in San Antonio, Texas, listed elsewhere on this site—but that’s another story. Other movies I saw at the Palace included “Tom Jones,” Dean Martin and Kim Novak in Billy Wilder’s “Kiss Me, Stupid,” and a mid-60s re-release of the 1958 Hammer version of “Dracula” with Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. Best wishes.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Paramount Theatre on Oct 7, 2005 at 5:45 pm

Update: the one I mention above as the “Colonial” may actually have been the Whitehaven Twin, a 1950s-era free-standing single screen, later twinned. It was on the East side of Elvis Presley Blvd but a mile or two North of Graceland. There was also the Bristol on Summer Avenue a little bit West of Highland, just North of I-40, demolished in the late 1970s. It was said to have been built when Summer Avenue was still called the “Bristol Highway.”

Backseater
Backseater commented about Summer Drive-In on Oct 7, 2005 at 5:37 pm

On further reflecdtion, the one on 51 South might have been called the Bellvue Drive-in.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Summer Drive-In on Oct 7, 2005 at 5:20 pm

The Summer Drive-In that I remember was definitely on the North side of Summer Avenue and East of loop 240. The very first Holiday Inn was in the same area, on the South side of Summer and West of 240. The first three Holiday Inns ever built were this one and two more on Highway 51, one North and one South of Memphis. Mr. Wilson was said to have gotten the idea from the 1940s Bing Crosby movie of the same name. I think all three had been sold and were no longer Holiday Inns by the 1970s. The Fare 4 quadruplex was also nearby, just West of 240 and on the South side of Summer Avenue, backing up to White Station. It was later expanded to a 10-plex. There was also a youth arcade or party center called the “Saturn” or something like that, very close to the Fare 4. If there were two Summer drive-ins as described above, that would explain why I remember hearing about it while a car-less Southwestern student in the early 1960s, whereas others remember it opening in 1966. The area became pretty run-down in the late 70s and early 80s, and some barbecue restaurants were converted to topless bars—but I wouldn’t know anything about that. Other Memphis area drive-ins included the Frayser, the 51 on South Highway 51 in Whitehaven, and one on Lamar Avenue near Getwell or Mendenhall and another on Park Avenue near East Parkway, which I’m still trying to remember the names of. Best wishes.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Summer Drive-In on Oct 6, 2005 at 4:20 pm

On the other hand, the article appears pretty sure of itself, and I suppose I could be wrong…it does happen occasionally.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Summer Drive-In on Oct 6, 2005 at 4:18 pm

I’m pretty sure it was operating in the early 1960s. I didn’t have a car then so I couldn’t go there, but I remember seeing ads for it as early as 1963-64. If so, it was only a twin (at most) at the time because I know it was years later that it became briefly a trio and then a quad. In the late 70s/early 80s on Sunday mornings I used to bicycle from the MSU area up Southern to White Station past the Paramount, then down White Station to Summer to the Fare 4, turn around in the Summer Drive-In entryway, then down Summer to Riverside Drive to Beale, make my “ritual circumnavigation of the Orpheum,” and then go back up Beale, Union, and Peabody to MSU; this took about 2 hours. Saw Angie Dickinson, Joan Prather, William Shatner, and Tom Skerritt in “Big Bad Mama” at the Summer. Also Stella Stevens and Stuart Whitman in “Las Vegas Lady” and James Ryan in a South African Martial-Arts movie called “Kill or Be Killed,” which was a cut above the usual “Chop-Opera.” Best wishes.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Studio Theater on Oct 6, 2005 at 3:00 am

It just occurred to me that if there was a theater on Court Avenue in Overton Square, it may have been the original Playhouse on the Square before it moved to the reconfigured Memphian. That would make sense.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Colonial Theater on Oct 5, 2005 at 8:29 pm

I saw a few soft-core pornos there while stationed at Mather AFB in 1968-69.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Paramount Theatre on Oct 5, 2005 at 8:02 pm

Point taken. I still believe the name change was a cheap trick, but I agree that this is not the most appropriate forum for the subject, so I apologize and will try to give it a rest. Meanwhile, this is a great site, and my most sincere compliments and appreciation to those who set it up. Now as for Memphis theaters—how about the Rosemary at Jackson and Watkins (replaced by a First Tennessee Bank which later also folded), the Princess on Main Street just North of the Malco/Orpheum, the Crosstown on Cleveland near North Parkway (Jehovah’s Witness Kingdom Hall), the Luciann on Summer just East of Trezevant (Porno/Bowling Alley), the Suzor #2 on Jackson Avenue in “Hurt Village” where Elvis used to go when he lived in the Projects (closed but still standing as late as 1981), the Fare 4 (later 10) at Summer and White Station, the Strand right next to Loew’s State on South Main, the Southbrook multiplex in Southbrook mall, The Colonial (? could be wrong on the name) just North of Graceland on Elvis Presley Blvd/Highway 51 in Whitehaven, and the Southaven multiplex just across the line in Mississippi—plus a couple of other indoors and several drive-ins whose names even I can’t remember? So many theaters, so little time…. Best wishes, good luck and good counting to all. W.H. Wingo, Southwestern at Memphis/“Rhodes College” class of 1967.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Mall of Memphis Cinema on Oct 5, 2005 at 4:50 am

The Mall of Memphis was just South of Loop 240 and Nonconnah Creek and just East of Getwell Road. It was built on the landfills of the 1930s and was very impressive, with two or three levels, a skating rink, the usual mix of retailers, and the theater complex. You could stand in the middle of the upper level promenade and feel the floor vibrate as people walked by—not very confidence-inspiring. The theater had an entrance separate from the mall, and was curiously sterile-looking. It always reminded me of the sets from “THX-1138.” The auditoriums were small and unpretentious. Saw Meg Ryan, Dennis Quaid, and Martin Short in “Innerspace” there in the late 1980s, while suffering from mild food poisoning—a memorable experience.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Balmoral Cinema on Oct 5, 2005 at 4:17 am

I went there a few times in the 1970s. One of our relief projectionists from the Guild ran it as an art theater for a while. It was a large strip-mall theater somewhat like the Paramount (described elsewhere on this site), but a little smaller and built later in the late 1960s/early 1970s suburban expansion. I saw several Laura Antonelli sex comedies, Romy Schneider and Rod Steiger in Claude Chabrol’s “Dirty Hands,” and most notably Klaus Kinski in Werner Herzog’s “Aguirre-the Wrath of God” there. My impression was that it struggled for its entire existence, probably due to the obscure location, not being on any well-travelled main drag, and not being very well known. There were two or three other mall theaters in other outlying suburbs that eventually suffered the same fate.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Studio Theater on Oct 4, 2005 at 6:57 pm

In 1973-74 I had an apartment at 1390 Court Avenue in Memphis. 2105 Court would have been somewhat East of there. In Memphis, “Streets” run North and South, and “Avenues” East and West. Mapquest shows no listing for “2105 Court Street”; but “2105 Court Avenue” is right where I thought it would be, in the Overton Square area not far from the Memphian Theater which is on South Cooper just South of Overton Park. I seem to remember that there was a small theater of some kind in Overton Square at or very near this location but I don’t think I ever went there and don’t recall any details about it. If there was one it was probably a live theater or music venue rather than movies. Any multiplex there now is almost certainly a recent addition. The last time I was in Memphis was the summer of 1998, and then not in that area.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Paramount Theatre on Oct 4, 2005 at 3:33 am

Saw the original “Star Wars” and “Alien” there in the late 1970s.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Evergreen Theatre on Oct 3, 2005 at 7:54 pm

I got my start in show business as a doorman/ticket taker at the Guild from 1965-67 and again from 1973-74, rising eventually to the rank of “assistant manager.” Everybody said it had once been named the Ritz. It was already being run by the Art Theater Guild in 1963 when I first went there as a freshman at Southwestern at Memphis (AKA “Rhodes College” —gag—). It was a medium-long walk or a short car ride (if you had one) from the SW campus and it seemed that entire generations of SW students had worked there. The tradition was that when you were about to graduate, you picked your successor and personally introduced him/her to the manager, Bill Kendall—a real nice guy and an SW grad himself. Almost everyone so introduced was hired. I remember seeing—not necessarily in order—“The Pawnbroker” with Rod Steiger, highly controversial in early 1960s Memphis because a black woman went topless; “Phaedra” with Melina Mercouri, Raf Vallone, and Anthony Perkins; “Blow-Up” for 8 weeks followed by “Georgy Girl” for 7 weeks (almost all showings were sold out—we called it “The House the Redgraves Built”); Roman Polanski’s “Knife in the Water”; Ingmar Bergman’s “Winter Light”; Fellini’s “8-½”; and (later) Richard Burton and Jenny Agutter in “Equus”, among many, many others. By 1973 the Art Theater Guild had pulled out and Mr. Kendall was booking the theater himself. Eventually, this failed and it was taken over by a third party who obtained a beer license and started perhaps one of the first “cabaret” or more accurately, “bar” theaters. Although no longer working there by then, I went as a customer and saw “Rocky Horror Picture Show” first-run before it became a cult classic and while you could still hear the dialog (approximately 1976). Unfortunately, I had several beers before the show started and don’t remember much about it. I lost track of the Guild during my last few years in Memphis, 1977-83. It was closed for a while, but eventally was acquired by Circuit Playhouse, a division of Playhouse on the Square, and is now a live theater venue. From the seating chart their website, it appears that they have enlarged the stage and cut out or replaced lots of the original seats. When I worked there it was a large open auditorium with no balcony and seated about 600. The original small square screen from the 1930s was still there, but a larger screen had been installed in front of it, with the loss of several rows of seats. Starting about 1966 we showed “Underground Movies” at midnight on Saturdays for a few months. It was illegal in Memphis to start a public movie after midnight, so we turned the entire theater into a private club with a 25-cent lifetime membership fee. Ah, memories.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Plaza Theatre on Oct 2, 2005 at 1:18 pm

I went to the Plaza while a student at Southwestern in the early 1960s and again from 1973-1982. Saw Michael Caine (playing a cracker with a hilarious fake southern accent) and Hanoi Jane Fonda in “Hurry Sundown” there about 1966. Years later, saw Sigourney Weaver in “Aliens” first-run after it was twinned. Plus many others, of course. The theater was surrounded on three sides by storefronts, and the side exits led through long (40 or 50 feet), dark passages between adjacent stores to the outside. My friend Bill Kendall from the Guild worked there in later years. He said that sometimes when a Cybill Shepherd movie would play, Cybill and her entourage would come down to the “cry room” and see it without having to mix with the rifraff. And you’re right about the curving walls—there was hardly a straight line in the entire place. Ah, memories.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Ritz Theater on Oct 2, 2005 at 12:54 pm

The Memphian was the Memphian as far back as 1963 and until it was taken over by Playhouse on the Square. I first went there in late 1963 or early 64. Before that I can’t say—but the Guild on Poplar was the only one I ever heard of as having once been named the Ritz, as described above. The Memphian was just across Overton Park from the Southwestern Campus and I used to walk over there to the show and then walk back across the park to SW at Midnight or later. Probably just as well not to get stopped by the Cops doing that, even in the early 1960s—and don’t even think about it nowadays! Best wishes.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Bellaire Theatre on Oct 1, 2005 at 5:19 pm

Went there often as a kid in the early 1950s. Saw “Zombies of the Stratosphere” a serial with Leonard Nimoy as the assistant Martian, obviously preparing for his later role as Mr. Spock. Also the original “Superman and the Mole Men.” Left Houston for Alabama in 1954.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Horseshoe Drive-In on Oct 1, 2005 at 5:13 pm

The Hillcrest was North of town on the East side of Bronte Highway (not U.S. 83), a little North of the present-day high school. In the late 1980s it was an oil-field equipment junkyard, like many other Texas drive-ins at that time. The last time I saw it about 2002, it was a Miracle-Gro plant; but the original driveway was there, and a couple of showcases with posters from the closing bill still in place. Saw “Suddenly Last Summer” there in 1959 or 1960. I was only about 15 so it went clear over my head—probably just as well.

Backseater
Backseater commented about State Theater on Oct 1, 2005 at 4:57 pm

I spent the summer of 1958 or 1959 in Winters visiting my uncle who had his veterinarian’s office in the screen of the Fiesta Drive-In, South of town on U.S. 83. I remember a closed movie theater in downtown Winters, recognizable from the architecture. I was only about 14 years old so the details are a little vague, but I think it may have been a lawyer’s office. I’m sure it was no longer in use as a theater.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Ritz Theater on Oct 1, 2005 at 4:20 pm

Correction: that’s Playhouse on the Square, not Theater Memphis—sorry.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Ritz Theater on Oct 1, 2005 at 4:16 pm

I got my start in show show business in 1965 tearing tickets at the Guild Art Theater at 1705 Poplar Avenue (at the intersection of Poplar and Evergreen). Generations of Southwestern students had worked there and the tradition was that when you graduated you would take your replacement over and introduce him to the manager (Bill Kendall, a real nice guy and a SW grad himself). Everybody said that the Guild had once been called the Ritz, and was renamed when the Art Theater Guild took it over in the 1950s. I can’t vouch for this myself since it was before my time, but that’s what knowledgable people said. I believe the Guild/Ritz and also the former Memphian theater (on South Cooper near Overton Square, sometimes rented by Elvis after hours) are now part of the Theater Memphis organization, and occasionally used for live performances.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Park Theatre on Oct 1, 2005 at 3:55 pm

An interesting urban legend about the Park is that when it was built about 1947, Park Avenue was the Southern City Limit, and being on the South side of the street the theater was not legally in Memphis. Lloyd T. Binford was still the Memphis Movie Censor at that time, appointed by E.H. Crump himself in the 1920s. They booked Howard Hughes' “The Outlaw” into the Park —the one where Jane Russell leans over the bed and a soldier in the audience is supposed to have jumped up and shouted “Bombs Away!” It was done very hush-hush, but Binford heard about anyway it and got the Mayor and City Council up in the middle of the night to move the city limits of Memphis 200 yards to the South so he could ban the movie. “The Outlaw” played in West Memphis like all the other “banned in Memphis” shows. That’s the legend anyway. I went to lots of movies at the Park while a student at “Rhodes College” (—gag—) 1963-67, and then again from 1973-1983. It was a large open auditorium with no balcony. Saw “Being There,” “Apocalypse Now,” “Altered States”, and “Thunderbolt and Lightfoot” there, among many others over the years. It closed not long after I left Memphis in 1983, was briefly a recording studio (I think) and then was boarded up for a long time. It was still standing in 1998, but I haven’t been back since then. Binford died in 1956, and I didn’t arrive in Memphis until 1963, but he was still a local show-business legend. I broke into show business by tearing tickets at the Guild (1705 Poplar at Evergreen) and the Studio (535 South Highland a few blocks down from the Park near MSU) and heard many amazing stories from the old-timers, most of them probably true. West Memphis had several drive-ins and several large indoor theaters, far more than you’d expect from its size, because they showed all the films that were banned in Memphis.

Backseater
Backseater commented about Paramount Theatre on Oct 1, 2005 at 3:29 pm

It opened before 1969: it was open while I was attending “Rhodes College” (—gag—) 1963-67, and “The Sound of Music” played there for nearly 2 years during that time (but I didn’t go). I think it was still a single screen when I got back from the AF in 1973, but was twinned shortly after that. A typical post-WWII shopping mall-airplane hangar house. Demolished and replaced by a Stein-Mart last I heard.