Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 51 - 75 of 9,298 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Broad Theatre on Oct 10, 2014 at 4:41 pm

The Broad Theatre was listed in the 1922 Harrisburg city directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Grand Theatre on Oct 10, 2014 at 4:37 pm

The Grand Theatre was listed in the 1922 Harrisburg city directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about National Theatre on Oct 10, 2014 at 4:30 pm

The National Theatre was listed at 1816 N. 6th Street in the 1922 Harrisburg city directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Hill Theatre on Oct 10, 2014 at 3:37 pm

The February 19, 1947, issue of the Harrisburg Evening News said that Harry Chertcoff’s new Hill Theatre in Camp Hill would open that night. The Hill Theatre was designed by architect William Lynch Murray.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theatre on Oct 10, 2014 at 3:17 pm

The Strand Theatre in Steelton was in operation by 1924, when it was bought by Charles E. Newbaker, according to an item in the October 27, 1927, issue of Motion Picture News. It said that Newbaker had owned the Strand and the older and smaller Standard Theatre, the first movie house in Steelton, for about three years.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Elton Theatre on Oct 10, 2014 at 3:10 pm

The historic address of the Elton Theatre was 428 N. Front Street (from a courtesy ad in the 1958 Steelton-Highspire High School yearbook,) but I think the theater must have been in the large brick building that now uses the address 448 N. Front. The entrance has been bricked up, and the current use is industrial.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Colonial Theatre on Oct 10, 2014 at 2:59 pm

The Colonial Theatre that burned in 1938 was the second house on the site. The story of the unusual method of replacing the original 1909 theater is told in this brief article from Motion Picture News of October 14, 1927:

“Old House Operated While New One Builds

“A construction feat has just been accomplished at Thirty-ninth Street and Woodland Avenue, Kansas City; where a new and larger motion picture theatre has been erected over an old one without discontinuing operation of the theatre for a single night. The construction work was in progress more than twenty-two weeks. The new theatre structure of the new Colonial Theatre, of which H. H. Barrett is manager, is higher and occupies twelve additional feet of ground on either side of the old building, which had stood there since 1909 and was erected while the latter was still standing.

“When the new building was completed the old one was removed from within, bit by bit, up until the formal opening of the new theatre this week. The seating capacity of 660 persons has been doubled through the addition of a balcony and the additional width on each side.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Avaloe Theater on Oct 10, 2014 at 2:37 pm

The “Chicago” column of the October 7, 1927, issue of Motion Picture News had this brief item about the Maplewood Theatre. The impending name change was not mentioned:

“I. Brotman plans to reopen the Maplewood Theatre, 2811 Diversey on November 1st. This house has been practically rebuilt, and offers the neighborhood a de luxe, up-to-date theatre of thirteen hundred seats. Mr. Brotman also owns and operates the Clybourn Theatre.”
There might have been some delay in completing the project, or the name might have been changed to the Avaloe some time after the house had reopened, as the opening of the Avaloe Theatre was mentioned in the March 23, 1928, issue of The Film Daily.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Clybourn Theatre on Oct 10, 2014 at 2:33 pm

An item in the October 7, 1927, issue of Motion Picture News said that I. Brotman was the owner of the Clybourn Theatre. Brotman’s son, Oscar, went on to have a long career in exhibition, operating several notable Chicago theaters.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Bay Theater on Oct 9, 2014 at 7:58 pm

There were two houses called the Bay Theatre in the Panama City area. The first was a small house that was being operated by J. E. Church at the time Martin Theatres bought out Church in the early 1930s. The original Bay Theatre was subsequently closed.

Martin later built the second Bay Theatre, which was located at Highway 98 and Wewahitchka Road (now E. 3rd Street) in Springfield, Florida. Although Springfield is a separate city, everything in it, including the city’s offices, has a Panama City address. Construction was begun on the second Bay Theatre in early 1942, but wartime material restrictions delayed its completion.

The second Bay Theatre advertised in the December 30, 1957, issue of the Panama City News, but I can’t find any later ads. For at least a year prior to that the house had most often shown double features of older movies, with the program changing three times a week, so it was apparently surviving as a revival house with occasional double features of exploitation movies.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Courtyard Cinema on Oct 9, 2014 at 7:24 pm

WaterWinterWonderland has another photo of the theater entrance on its Courtyard Cinema page. There is also a shot of the freestanding attraction board at the street, which says “Courtyards Cinema 5” on it, so that must be its actual name though all the Internet says just Courtyard Cinema.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Panama Theater on Oct 9, 2014 at 4:15 pm

The July 11, 1925, issue of Motion Picture News mentioned Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Atkinson, operators of the Panama Theatre in Panama City, Florida.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Tift Theatre for the Performing Arts on Oct 9, 2014 at 1:44 pm

The Tift Theatre bears a strong resemblance to the Martin Theatre (formerly the Ritz) in Panama City, Florida, which was opened in 1936.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theatre on Oct 8, 2014 at 7:44 pm

The description of the building at 1913 Lakin Avenue in a brochure with a walking tour of Great Bend says this:

“Charles Andress, famous circus man and entrepreneur, built this brick building in 1909. In the winter months, when he wasn’t on the road, Andress managed the Strand Theatre, which continued in business until 1954. Since that time, the space has been used as a retail store.”
The theater trade journals of the period don’t mention a Strand Theatre at Great Bend. There were houses called the Echo, the Lakin, the Regent, and the Elite, which was later renamed the Lyric.

A conflicting report about a theater Charles Andress owned in Great Bend came from the August 1, 1927, issue of The Hutchinson News:

“VETERAN SHOWMAN BUYS NEW GREAT BEND THEATRE.

“Great Bend, Kan., Aug. 1— Charles Andress, veteran Great Bend circus man, now retired, has bought the fine new theatre, how being built here, The State. The name will be changed and it will be known as the Andress.

“Several of tho improvements planned for the theatre but which have been held up because of lack of finances will now be finished.

“A. C. Woolen, manager of the theatre will be retained as manager, R. F. Rickart of Elkhart, Kan., who financed the building of the theatre, last week decided to withdraw from the enterprise.”

The trade journals don’t mention either a State Theatre or an Andress Theatre in Great Bend, either. I don’t know if these two sources refer to two different theaters, or if the history of one theater has gotten muddled over the years. An article saying that the Strand had closed permanently ran in the October 21, 1957, issue of the Great Bend Daily Tribune. That article said that the Strand had opened “…about 25 years ago.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Flag Theatre on Oct 8, 2014 at 12:56 pm

The new theater under construction for the Sproule brothers at 310-312 N. Main Street was designed by the local architectural firm of Smith & English, according to the May 6, 1936, issue of The Hutchinson, Kansas, News.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Aztec Theatre on Oct 8, 2014 at 12:02 pm

Here is the official web site of the Aztec Theatre. There are a few music events scheduled this month, but fewer for November and December. At least the place is open.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about North Star Cinema on Oct 8, 2014 at 11:13 am

The North Star Cinema was designed by William Riseman Associates. Plans, sections, and detail sheets are in the J. Evan Miller collection of Cinerama Theater Plans at UCLA’s Charles E. Young Research Library.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Palace Theatre on Oct 7, 2014 at 6:14 pm

The Palace Theatre in Corpus Christi had a Reuter organ of three manuals and eight ranks, opus 214, installed in 1926. The Reuter Organ Company of Lawrence, Kansas, is still in business. Throughout its history it has made primarily church organs, but there were about fifty installations in theaters, mostly in Texas and Kansas, from 1919 to 1929.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Grande Theatre on Oct 7, 2014 at 4:53 pm

The Grande Theatre has been demolished and construction has begun on the site for the new headquarters of the Nueces County Regional Transportation Authority. The Melba Theatre across the street has also been demolished, but for private redevelopment for which plans are indefinite.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theatre on Oct 7, 2014 at 3:07 pm

This house originally opened on May 10, 1913, as the Martin Theatre. I don’t know when it was renamed DeLuxe, but the DeLuxe Theatre reopened on March 17, 1923, after being remodeled. Wayne Martin’s original lease was for five years, so the house might have been renamed DeLuxe before the 1923 remodeling.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Diana Theatre on Oct 7, 2014 at 12:35 pm

A full page ad for the Diana Theatre in the April 23, 1948, issue of The Tipton Daily Tribune said that the fire the previous year had virtually destroyed the old theater and building, and that the new Diana Theatre was new construction. The project was designed by the architectural and engineering firm of Johnson, McKinney & Schenck.

An article in the Monday, June 24, 1946, issue of The Tipton Daily Tribune said that Wednesday would mark the 20th anniversary of the Diana Theatre. Nick Paikos, the original owner, was still operating the house. The article said that prior to being remodeled and reopened as the Diana the building had housed the Grand Theatre, but that it had been closed for some time.

The Grand Theatre was mentioned in the April 1, 1922, issue of Exhibitors Herald, which said that it had been bought by Clyde Wilson. Previously it had been operated by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Jackson.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Capitol Theatre on Oct 6, 2014 at 6:14 pm

The July 19, 1929, issue of The Film Daily reported that the Dixie Theatre at Uniontown, Pennsylvania, had been gutted by a fire causing an estimated $30,000 of damage.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Palace Theater on Oct 6, 2014 at 4:53 pm

This article from Lehigh Valley Business of May 1, 2014, says that the Palace Theatre building is being renovated for use as a brew pub/restaurant, bakery, and coffee shop. Seat from the theater will be used in the waiting area, and movie posters found in the theater will be displayed.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Capitol Theatre on Oct 6, 2014 at 1:05 pm

A list of historic theaters in Iowa prepared in 2009 (pdf here) has this ambiguous line for the address of the Capitol: “193 South Central Avenue or 314 South Central Avenue.” It also gives an alternate name for the structure as the P. A. Leese Building. Here is a photo of the P. A. Leese Building, which is at 193 S. Central Avenue. I’m not sure where the address 314 originated, but it seems an unlikely location for a theater, being on the other side of the railroad tracks from Hartley’s small business district and adjacent to a large grain elevator.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Capitol Theatre on Oct 6, 2014 at 12:48 pm

The Capitol was mentioned in the Iowa “Changes in Ownership” column of the July 1, 1929, issue of The Film Daily: “ Hartley — Capitol, sold to C. A. Sartorius by A. M. Inman.” Mr. Sartorius sent in a couple of capsule movie reviews for the “What the Picture Did for Me” column of Motion Picture Herald in 1934.

Someone named H. Midland was operating a theater at Hartley in 1913 according to the December 27 issue of The Moving Picture World, but the name of the theater was not given. The May 6, 1916, issue of the same publication mentioned a Rex Theatre in Hartley, and it might have been the same house that H. Midland was operating in 1913.

The Capitol might have closed for a while in the 1950s, but must have reopened later as it was advertising in the newspaper at least as late as December 30, 1976.