Beekman Theatre

1254 Second Avenue,
New York, NY 10021

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Showing 76 - 100 of 402 comments

frankdev
frankdev on January 24, 2006 at 7:00 pm

past the site where the beekman used to be, SAD VERY SAD

frankdev
frankdev on January 24, 2006 at 6:58 pm

howardbhaas. I made an error with the closing of the state that will close at the end of the month. As for the e-walk i work for loew’s and the sale to regal is going on> It looks like unless something changes it will be regal. as of jann 27 Amc will take over loew’s and for the first time in 102 years, there will be no loew’s theaters

CelluloidHero2
CelluloidHero2 on January 22, 2006 at 10:14 am

EdSolero… That was SethLewis who say The Maltese Bippy.See the posting just before mine.

HowardBHaas
HowardBHaas on January 21, 2006 at 11:59 pm

A January 12 post above says the Loews State is now closed, but it is stilll listed with movies on Loews site as of today. Same post says Regal will operate Loews E-Walk. Is that mere speculation? Besides Clearview, there are other companies such as National Amusements or Crown that are in the general region that could do so.

As to the Beekman demolition photos, yes, thanks, Dave, for the photos of this sad story.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on January 21, 2006 at 6:01 pm

Thanks Dave… you’ve done a tremendous job documenting the final days of this once great neighborhood cinema – from beloved upper east side fixture to vacant shell to forlorn parcel of rubble. A sad tale to be sure, but one that needed to be recorded nonetheless.

JohnG409… The Maltese Bippy, huh? I’ve always wondered if the success of Laugh-In did much to help that Rowan and Martin flick do much business. Do you recall if there was much of a crowd when you saw it?

And don’t answer “You bet your sweet Bippy!”

Say goodnight, Dick.

bazookadave
bazookadave on January 21, 2006 at 2:43 pm

You’re very welcome. Here are two final images, January 21, 2006:
I believe that is the the last vestige of the raked floor of the balcony, at the rear wall of the site:

View link

Gone. The trees that flanked the Beekman entrance remain.

View link

CelluloidHero2
CelluloidHero2 on January 19, 2006 at 12:46 am

Thanks to both Davebazooka and AAlvarez for the great documentation of the Beekman. Always one of the premiere theaters in NYC. Spent much time in there. Some of the films I saw include Two Lane Blacktop, Slapshot, An Unmarried Woman, Magic, Roadie, Pope of Greenwich Village, Play It At It Lays, Stakeout, Stay As You Are, Frances, Bite The Bullet, Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade,Empire of The Sun and Always.

SethLewis
SethLewis on January 13, 2006 at 11:05 pm

As indicated in the very first post for this theatre, this was one my local theatres growing up. Thanks to AAlvarez for coming up with these lists. What they tell us is how flexible Rugoff/Cinema 5/RKO Century/Cineplex and finally Clearview were with this theatre in the variety of first run, Hollywood, foreign art and revival programming. When I get back to NY it distresses how few theatres are left on the East Side and though multiplexes and advance booking serve their purpose, it was a lot more fun when you used to line up for hours on a cold night around the block at the Beekman, the Cinema 1 or the Sutton.
For the record, from those lists I was there for South Pacific, Laurel & Hardy’s Roaring Twenties, The Two of Us, The Maltese Bippy, Lady L, The Liquidator, Z, The Confession, The Sorrow and the Pity, Little Murders (and I’m sure Paper Chase not Brewster McCloud), The Exorcist,Animal House, The Milagro Beanfield War, When Harry Met Sally, Mad Max 2 The Road Warrior, Clean and Sober and probably a few more

frankdev
frankdev on January 12, 2006 at 8:26 am

Thanks Irv!I just laughed my butt off!!! In truth I used the name Ben Franklyn! Just lke my engagment to Sandra Bullock, We kept it quiet so the Paparazzi would not bother me. In fact if you ever ask her she would still prtened not to know me. This of course ended when she got married, i then had to break it off

evmovieguy
evmovieguy on January 12, 2006 at 8:08 am

Wait a minute. You mean somebody named Frank Devlin DIDN’T sign the Declaration of Independence? No wonder I failed history.

frankdev
frankdev on January 12, 2006 at 8:02 am

No Irv they don’t that ended abot 1979, and yes i was there for “Robin Hood” I Liked that film it was fun! I"ll tell you one story i hope you find funny a friend and i were rolling up copies of the declaration of independence to give out in 1976 for the film"1776" well after a while we got bored and decieded to sign our names on a couple of them. I wonder if any kid got an f for nameing Frank Devlin as one of the signers of the declaration?

evmovieguy
evmovieguy on January 12, 2006 at 7:53 am

That’s really cool astrocks. You were probably working there the first time I went to Radio City in 1973 to see the Christmas Show. I remember they showed the animated Disney’s ‘Robin Hood’ before the actual live show started. They don’t so that anymore.

frankdev
frankdev on January 12, 2006 at 7:48 am

Hi Irv! The Loew’s E-Walk will be run by Regal cinemas. and the State theater in the virgin mega store is now closed. oh yes the Music Hall is the greatest part of my life! I started out as a usher and the worked my way to be the office assistant in the costume dept.I was fortunate to work with many wonderful people some are still firends of mine to this day. as i wrote on the music hall web site, if you could look at my heart you will find the Music Hall logo!!

evmovieguy
evmovieguy on January 12, 2006 at 7:40 am

Astrocks-Are they closing the Loew’s on 42 St.??

Wow that must have been great managing Radio City 35 years ago.

frankdev
frankdev on January 12, 2006 at 7:34 am

Irv, Talk about hitting the nail on the head. I have been a theater manager for about 25 years now and 10 before that at Radio City Music Hall. The list of theaters that are no longer with us just makes me shake my head throw up my arms and say it’s over. We now have these faceless,no history,empty, rooms with a screen in it. I grew up going to loew’s theaters, mine was the triboro in astoria. but thats when theaters were theaters were theaters and they were run by theater people, not bean counters who were told in a class room how to run a theater,insread of running one. As of jan 26th there will no longer be any loew’s theater, after 102 years that is sad.I can only thank you and the rest of the good people on this site and other theater web sites, for keeping theater history alive

evmovieguy
evmovieguy on January 12, 2006 at 6:47 am

Mikeoaklandpark-2nd Avenue Deli closed literally out of nowhere last week. Their new landlord wanted to up their rent approx. $10,000 per month. Aside from feeling ripped-off, I think they were just plain insulted. They started taking the signs down this past Tuesday. Shame.

davebazooka-You are SO on the money with your comment. I’m not a native New Yorker, but have lived here 20 years. It’s interesting to hear you say that the ‘reinvention’ of New York started in the 70s. Let me tell you…it was a slow process that seems to have only excelerated over the last 5-10 years. In regard to all of the changes that are happening here, I find myself often in conversation with my friends about how things used to be cooler and edgier in New York City and we all agree that we probably got to see the last good chunk of the ‘Sin City’ that New York was known as. Dark, fun, scary, interesting, historical. A place that challenged not only physically but intellectually. That’s no revisionist history, that’s just a plain fact. I wanted to be in New York City because it was waaaay different from the monotony of the suburbs I grew up in, now it’s becoming everything I wanted to get away from.

Now that I am nearing 40 years old, what frustrates me the most is how the youth that are moving into this town now have absolutely no…well…BALLS for lack of a better term. I always saw New York as a place for experimentation by young people. Art, music, poetry, theater, and fortunately or unfortunately, sex and drugs. Now?…forget it, the only place you see a large congregation of kids is at Starbucks. That seems to be the new ‘hang-out’ for the youth of today. Good luck! No flavor, no curiosity, no nothing. A total generation of Paris Hiltons and Ryan Seacrests. Disgusting!!!!!

Mikeoaklandpark
Mikeoaklandpark on January 12, 2006 at 4:51 am

Irv
When did 2nd Ave Deli close? I was there on my NYC visit in 200 and purchased the cookbbok.

bazookadave
bazookadave on January 12, 2006 at 4:19 am

In the 1970s when New York City was “reinventing” itself, it did so in the image of wealthy suburbanites. Now it is primarily a town for rich financial types or corporate lawyers, and no one else. Many of these are notoriously conservative and not interested in diversity or urban “edginess,” so they bring the bland homogeneity of the suburbs to the cities and the result is the metropolis of today, increasingly governed by the interests of the wealthy, and as dull as the ‘burbs. Everyone and everything else, including old movie theatres and other landmarks, and the middle class, are expected to disappear, and there will ultimately be little support for them.

I realize this is a simplification, and it is not meant to generalize about all wealthy people, many of whom moved to the city to escape the suburbs and are probably equally disappointed about the city’s genericization. As a native New Yorker I am not sorry to see the days of high crime and widespread deteriorating neighborhoods behind us. But there is definitely a change for the worse afoot in NYC which is at risk of becoming nothing more than a giant boring mall.

evmovieguy
evmovieguy on January 11, 2006 at 9:44 am

Sad to see that. I was by there last night while riding the bus downtown. It was dark so I couldn’t see much. But since we’re on the subject here’s a short list of places vital to the landscape of New York City that we have lost in addition to the Beekman in the past year and some that will be gone by this time next year.

Howard Johnson’s Times Square (in business since 1959) GONE
2nd Avenue Deli (also in business for roughly 50 years) GONE
The Variety Theater (early 1900s?) GONE
The Sutton Theater (1950s) GONE

…and this time next year: legendary rock club CBGB. GONE

The current…ahem..political climate, IMHO shares the blame for this genericization of New York City and it’s disgusting. In the last 10 years New York City has lost ALOT of it’s character. I’m running out of reasons to continue to pay high rent and deal with the shortcomings of living here.

evmovieguy
evmovieguy on January 11, 2006 at 9:43 am

Sad to see that. I was by there last night while riding the bus downtown. It was dark so I couldn’t see much. But since we’re on the subject here’s a short list of places vital to the landscape of New York City that we have lost in addition to the Beekman in the past year and some that will be gone by this time next year.

Howard Johnson’s Times Square (in business since 1959) GONE
2nd Avenue Deli (also in business for roughly 50 years) GONE
The Variety Theater (early 1900s?) GONE
The Sutton Theater (1950s) GONE

…and soon to be a memory by this time next year: legendary rock club CBGB.

The current…ahem..political climate, IMHO shares the blame for this genericization of New York City and it’s disgusting. In the last 10 years New York City has lost ALOT of it’s character. I’m running out of reasons to continue to pay high rent and deal with the shortcomings of living here.

evmovieguy
evmovieguy on January 11, 2006 at 9:27 am

Sad to see that. I was by there last night while riding the bus downtown. It was dark so I couldn’t see much. But since we’re on the subject here’s a short list of places vital to the landscape of New York City that we have lost in addition to the Beekman in the past year and some that will be gone by this time next year.

Howard Johnson’s Times Square (in business since 1959) GONE
2nd Avenue Deli (also in business for roughly 50 years) GONE
The Variety Theater (early 1900s?) GONE
The Sutton Theater (1950s) GONE

…and soon to be a memory by this time next year: legendary rock club CBGB.

The current…ahem..political climate, IMHO shares the blame for this genericization of New York City and it’s disgusting. In the last 10 years New York City has lost ALOT of it’s character. I’m running out of reasons to continue to pay high rent and deal with the shortcomings of this town. The life is getting sucked outta here.

bazookadave
bazookadave on January 11, 2006 at 9:20 am

I had hoped to get there while they were removing the Beekman logo, but I did not. They probably took it down very quickly so no one would stop and gawk. I peered through the black fence to see if it was lying around anywhere but it is nowhere to be seen. It may have been tossed into the wreckage pile and will be carted off with the rest of the building. Let’s hope it is indeed someplace safe! I think the Beekman logo out in that theatre on LI may have come off the original marquee, not this last vestige on the parapet, but I am not sure. :–(

NativeForestHiller
NativeForestHiller on January 11, 2006 at 9:11 am

Very sad indeed! :( I’m fed up with the Landmarks Preservation Commission. They designate what they’re in facor of, and treat the public like “2nd fiddle.” Who knows a neighborhood’s history better than those residing in a particular vicinity? And the LPC doesn’t even grant several worthy buildings a hearing!!! How many theaters have we lost in a rather short timespan? Beekman, Sutton, defining World’s Fair features of the Trylon Theater’s entrance pavilion, etc… No LPC hearing = Dereliction of public duty = No democracy! Let’s hope that Intro 705, the Landmarks Hearing Bill, gets approved!!! For more info: View link

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on January 11, 2006 at 8:53 am

Unfortunately, yet another very sad loss in a long line of very sad losses for NYC. I assume they’re storing the cursive Beekman sign that stood atop the front facade parapet wall somewhere safe until it can be integrated into the new building? Or will those famous letters mysteriously “disappear” before then?

bazookadave
bazookadave on January 11, 2006 at 8:42 am

:–)
I just can’t imagine that street without the Beekman. While I took photos this morning there were quite a few passersby stopping to watch or point or talk about the theatre. A very sad loss for NYC.