Jackson Heights Cinema

40-31 82nd Street,
Jackson Heights, NY 11373

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Showing 101 - 125 of 156 comments

RobertR
RobertR on July 11, 2005 at 10:20 am

I never knew the jackson was such a beautiful house. It’s shocking they have not carved up that main floor. Has anyone seen it recently, does it look the same?

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on July 11, 2005 at 10:06 am

Here’s an early image of the Jackson’s auditorium. Please note the similarities to the Sunnyside, which had the same architect, Herbert J. Krapp. But the Jackson was smaller and had stadium seating at the rear. The Sunnyside was all on one deeply-pitched floor:
www.i8.photobucket.com/albums/a18/Warrengwhiz/124-2495_IMG.jpg

br91975
br91975 on June 20, 2005 at 12:54 pm

Had a chance to peek inside the Jackson Triplex when I was in the area a couple of weeks ago and have to say I was very impressed with how well-preserved it is, save for some graffiti on the upper facade and a somewhat modernized (with stucco walls) vestibule area between the main entrance and secondary set of doors. It’s clear the owners recognize the value of the property; they’re also, from what I could tell, doing a solid business.

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on December 29, 2004 at 1:33 pm

Ok Warren, we will give it the majority view that Krapp was the architect.

I just find it strange that in an architectural magazine like The Architectural Forum was, there would be a ‘mistake’ in captions to photographs of theaters illustrated as having been designed by the architect and writer of the article-Charles Sandblom. Maybe a correction was printed in the following issue, eh?

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on December 29, 2004 at 12:55 pm

Perhaps Charles Sandblom wrote an article about the Jackson Theatre for The Architectural Forum. Architecture & Building Magazine had photographs and a short article claiming Herbert J. Krapp as architect. Krapp’s daughter, whom I once interviewed while doing theatre research, told me that her father took her to the Jackson’s opening. I have a list of Sandblom theatres compiled by a member of Theatre Historical Society of America, and the Jackson isn’t on it. The Jackson’s opening date has been reported as December 26, 1924. For that year, the Sandblom list credits him only with the Cross Bay and Broadway, both in Queens.

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on December 23, 2004 at 7:44 am

The Jackson Theatre is given as having a seating capacity of 1,839 in Film Daily Yearbook for 1941, and 1,821 in the F.D.Y for 1950.

I have photographs of the auditorium and foyer taken at its opening which illustrate an article by Charles Sandblom in the June 1925 edition of the magazine “The Architectural Forum”.

Charles A. Sandblom is credited as the architect of the Jackson Theatre.

br91975
br91975 on November 21, 2004 at 1:10 am

Let’s give all this talk about ‘subtitled films at the Jackson Triplex’ A REST!!! Chill, people, chill… and let’s move on…

Divinity
Divinity on November 21, 2004 at 12:58 am

Some claim that subtitles are a “distraction” (as posted above).
I happen to think that it’s a bit deeper than that.
You may be on to something Jamie Somers.
By the way Jamie, I simply adore the bionic woman. Did you grow up watching those re-runs or is that your real name?

Broan
Broan on November 20, 2004 at 7:01 pm

Hm… from a business standpoint, which movie theater in an ethnically diverse area will do better? One that shows movies catering to the two largest groups, or one? Which group is larger, the xenophobes who are afraid of words they don’t understand, or the minority with no alternative venue. Gee… this is a tricky one.

And isn’t it simply appalling how opera houses are now projecting subtitles for their operas? If you want to understand opera, you should learn the language!

JamieSomers
JamieSomers on November 20, 2004 at 6:43 pm

Oh my Gosh! What is the big deal about people enjoying there language. We need more ethnic venues like that to assist people that dont know the language and people that want to understand another one. I think that you people are bothered by the fact that it is a Spanish theatre, not by the letters. You are probably the same kind of people that hide in the shadows of the night so that no one will see you when you paint swasticas on our temple.

Bway
Bway on November 6, 2004 at 8:25 am

I agree Robert. As I said, I will not discuss this any firther either.

RobertR
RobertR on November 6, 2004 at 8:23 am

This page is becoming another Ridgewood Folly, lets move on to something interesting like the Westbury. :)

Bway
Bway on November 6, 2004 at 7:54 am

LIMovies, that’s just my point (and the last I will talk about this). It is truly great when they can make a theater into a theater for different languages, especially if there is a call for it, and there is an available theater. That is not what I had the problem with. It’s the fact that the Jackson Triplex is the only theater within miles for all the other people that don’t speak Spanish, where they can all go to a movie and not have to watch a movie with the distraction of subtitles. That’s the reason. There is noting wrong with making a theater have subtitles, if there are nearby alternatives for all the English speaking people.
If the Boulevard theater in Jackson Heights still existed, or some other theater in a neighboring community, or if the Fair Theater was showing regular movies as opposed to porn, then it would be fine if the Jackson Triplex was showing movies with foreign language subtitles. But the fact is that there is no alternative for English speaking people unless they travel outside their own community.

longislandmovies
longislandmovies on November 5, 2004 at 11:26 pm

can we save the world other than at the JACKSON TRIPLEX!!!!!!!

Divinity
Divinity on November 5, 2004 at 11:22 pm

Tony,
It is possible that there is a theater with Italian subtitles that your whole family could enjoy. With everyone able to understand the film, it should be a pleasant occasion for all of you. Try calling Clearview Cinemas, or search for a local theater on the web.

tony123
tony123 on November 5, 2004 at 1:39 am

Whats the comotion all about. My parents and grandparents only speak italian its only my genration that speak english cause they dont undestand. It’d be great if they could have italian theaters so they could understand more. they been ok in morris park where alot of people speak italian and the friendly neigbors read them the mail. We even got a colombus day parade here and everything. Were italian first then american. They dont care so we have to so that we can be better. Stop complainin and get a life.let spanish people have their own theater, you dont got to go.im lucky enough to know both but they struggled to much working in factories and the bakery to have time to learn. fogetabotit!

Divinity
Divinity on November 4, 2004 at 11:51 pm

Unless you are suffering from Attention Deficit Disorder or some other visually crippling disability you should have no trouble viewing the film.
As for people who live abroad, there are British and American institutions that teach English as a primary language. Because many foreign hotels, government agencies, banks, buisnesses, cultural institions, cafes and other venues employ multilingual staff, it is not necessary to focus on the local language, as it is not necessary in the U.S. for dominant groups of non-English speaking people who are probably not interested in learing the language because they are comfortably catered to in their own.

deleted user
[Deleted] on November 4, 2004 at 9:59 pm

Are you people aware that there is a Spanish version of the search engine Google?
http://www.google.com.mx/

longislandmovies
longislandmovies on November 4, 2004 at 9:43 pm

I was sick when i went to vote and the polling place also had every thing in Spanish!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Bway
Bway on November 4, 2004 at 8:16 pm

English is the official language of this country, not Spanish, not Italian, not Chinese. I have nothing against people keeping their cultures (and Spanish subtitles in a theater have nothing to do with Spanish culture). If I would move to France, I would be expected to learn French. If I were to move to Germany, I would be expected to learn German. If I were to move to Spain, I would be expected to know Spanish. If someone chooses to move to another country, that is their choice. If a Polish person comes to this country, the people already here should not have to learn Polish, it’s the other way around. This has nothing to do with culture, and of course everyone should hold on to their culture. However, The Jackson Heights Triplex is not a culture venue, it is a movie theater showing English movies with Spanish subtitles, in an area where there is no alternative for another theater for people that don’t speak Spanish. If it was to become a Spanish heritage theater showing cultural films, etc, that is a totally different scenario, but it isn’t a Spanish Heritage theater.

Divinity
Divinity on November 4, 2004 at 7:45 pm

I sometimes wonder if our society has moved beyond the days of Ellis Island when the (ethnic sounding)last names were shortened to sound more “American” and people were expected to assimilate and leave their cultures back in the old country. If you are not of British descent, the English language is not your native tongue, and if you are not of Native American descent then you are the descendant of an immigrant somewhere along the line. Over many generations some Americans have lost important ties with their cultural heritage and language. The new waves of immigrants dont have to because of venues like this theatre that cater to them as well as bilingual staff in schools, buisnesses and cultural institutions (some hosting exhibitions regarding their culture and tradition). It is a crimminal act to try and erase the culture and influence of people who reside in the U.S. since many people have lost their own. With out knowlege of ones heritage and language, there is nothing but a big empty hole in ones past. We should embrace the Spanish speaking community for preserving their customs, weaving new colors and moving new rythm into the fabric of our country.
I urge those who have no knowlege of their origins to seek it. Without knowing the truth you have no place in a world where one can easily be lost or forgotten.

Bway
Bway on November 4, 2004 at 11:10 am

Yes, I have to admit that when I lived in Ridgewood, I would travel to other areas to see movies, once I was old enough to ride the subway, or take the bus without an adult. Not only did it make a “day” out of it, which is great when you are a kid, it was also because of the condition of the Ridgewood Theater. I haven’t been in the Ridgewood since around 1990, but in the 80’s the Ridgewood was a dirty, run down, stick to the floor, and get sick on the popcorn type of place. I am hoping it improved, but from what people have said it hasn’t.
If the Jackson is similar in condition, why don’t they just fix these places up to attract patrons? They could start with better cleaning practices, because it is easier to handle “run down” than ti handle “dirty”. And it is a lot cheaper to clean than to do major renovations. It’s a start.

RobertR
RobertR on November 4, 2004 at 11:02 am

The Jackson may find this increses their box office numbers. This house like the Ridgewood is getting pretty run down and alot of people may drive to other areas to see films. Believe it or not the psychos who owned the Westbury ran some of the Paramount titles with Spanish subtitles. Who they were trying to attract there is a mystery.