Comments from RobbKCity

Showing 101 - 125 of 139 comments

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about River Oaks Theater on Aug 1, 2006 at 7:39 pm

I find it interesting that Weingarten Realty brags about the historic nature of River Oaks, and its significant architecture, on the shopping center’s Web site, and then proposes tearing part of it, and the theaters, down. After all, they openly state that it’s a historic landmark.

“Aside from being one of Houston’s premiere shopping, dining and entertainment experiences, River Oaks Shopping Center is also a historical landmark!

River Oaks Shopping Center is the oldest shopping center in Texas and the second oldest shopping center in the nation (Country Club Plaza in Kansas City, Missouri is the nation’s oldest).

Hugh Potter, the center’s designer, began building River Oaks Shopping Center in 1937.

River Oaks Shopping Center is one of Houston’s premier examples of Modern architectural design. When you visit, take notice of its pair of curved sections facing Shepherd Drive, followed by the long horizontal units on either side of West Gray. These features are representative of typical Modern design. In addition, many classic ‘30’s and '40’s motifs and materials- rounded corners, “porthole” windows and light fixtures, black glass and stucco- can also be seen among the center’s Modern design details."

View link

I mean, jeez, talk about wanting to have it both ways.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Alabama Theatre on Aug 1, 2006 at 7:36 pm

I find it interesting that Weingarten Real Estate brags about the historic nature of River Oaks, and its significant architecture, on the shopping center’s Web site, and then proposes tearing part of it, and the theaters, down. After all, they openly state that it’s a historic landmark.

“Aside from being one of Houston’s premiere shopping, dining and entertainment experiences, River Oaks Shopping Center is also a historical landmark!

River Oaks Shopping Center is the oldest shopping center in Texas and the second oldest shopping center in the nation (Country Club Plaza in Kansas City, Missouri is the nation’s oldest).

Hugh Potter, the center’s designer, began building River Oaks Shopping Center in 1937.

River Oaks Shopping Center is one of Houston’s premier examples of Modern architectural design. When you visit, take notice of its pair of curved sections facing Shepherd Drive, followed by the long horizontal units on either side of West Gray. These features are representative of typical Modern design. In addition, many classic ‘30’s and '40’s motifs and materials- rounded corners, “porthole” windows and light fixtures, black glass and stucco- can also be seen among the center’s Modern design details."

View link

I mean, jeez, talk about wanting to have it both ways.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Madrid Theatre on Aug 1, 2006 at 2:50 pm

Yes, the Madrid does have an upper balcony, and it appears the original design did have additional seats along the sides.

Here are links to some photos taken after the renovation.

View link

View link

View link

View link

Here is the front facade and entrance:

View link

The lobby:

View link

The fountain in the lobby:

View link

Stairs to the upper lobby:

View link

Upper lobby:

View link

View link

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Isis Theater on Jul 22, 2006 at 6:37 pm

The Wirthman Building and Isis Theater were originally constructed in 1918 as a two-story building. The additional stories were added later. It appears it was done sometime between 1918-27, since the additional stories appear in photos taken in 1927.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Alamo Drafthouse Mainstreet on Jul 18, 2006 at 6:49 am

Here’s an update on the renovations of the Empire and Midland theaters. The big news is that the Empire will be renamed the Mainstreet Theatre. This was the theater’s original name when it opened in 1921.

Asbestos removal on the Empire Theater has been completed, so renovation of that structure can now begin.

The following is a recent article in the Kansas City Star.

View link

(article text follows in case the link goes dead)

Empire to transform from eyesore to eye-catcher

The one-time vaudeville venue will be a modern movie house.

By KEVIN COLLISON
The Kansas City Star
July 15, 2006

For 20 years, the shuttered Empire Theater has rotted at the corner of 14th and Main streets, trees sprouting from its roof, a poignant symbol of downtown neglect.

On Friday, for the first time in a generation, Kansas City got a peek inside the former vaudeville palace where crowds once plopped 50 cents â€"a dime if you were a kidâ€"during the Roaring ’20s to be entertained by the likes of Charlie Chaplin, and George Burns and his wife, Gracie Allen.

A sheet of the cheap metal siding installed to deter vandals had been peeled back to reveal the old address, 1402, etched on the red granite facade. Inside, the vast auditorium where a million people laughed in 1921, the first year it opened, was a dank tomb stripped to its concrete and brick foundation.

Only a few stretches of terrazzo floor and the once-grand staircase remained from the rich, original French Baroque interior. A guide likened it to exploring the wreckage of the Titanic.

It was not until recently that the building could even be entered without wearing a protective suit and using a respirator. Tons of asbestos and mold-covered debris had to be removed, an estimated 200 dump-truck loads, before it reached the point where new construction could begin.

“It was quite a mess,” said Guy Gingrich, senior project manager for Kingston Environmental Services. “We found the building on the inside had been completely falling apart and asbestos was everywhere.”

Now, the theater is poised to be reborn as a six-screen, digital movie complex where patrons will be able to dine before enjoying their film with wine. It is also getting back its original name, the Mainstreet Theatre.

Kansas City-based AMC Entertainment and The Cordish Co. of Baltimore are reviving the theater’s role as a cornerstone of downtown entertainment. It is scheduled to reopen in early 2008, following a $25 million renovation.

“We’re going to celebrate the historic fabric and roots of the building …Taking it back to its historic roots, making it a place where people return to for entertainment, theater and culture,” said Reed Cordish, a vice president at the firm.

The 90,000-square-foot theater has had a bumpy history and some close calls with the wrecking ball. The Mainstreet shut down in 1938 because of the Depression, briefly resumed business in 1941, then closed again until it reopened as the RKO Missouri in 1949. In 1960, AMC purchased the old theater and rechristened it the Empire. The auditorium, a breathtakingly lofty space, had a false ceiling built to create two theaters in 1966. But as downtown declined, it finally closed in 1985.

The theater’s succeeding ownership neglected it to the point that trees took root in the roof, growing more than 25 feet tall, and water ruined the interior with mold and decay. Pigeons relieved themselves on the dome sheathed in terra cotta scallops. Chunks of the ornate cornice cracked and fell on the roof.

While a landmark in the hearts of many, it did not have formal historic designation and protection from City Hall.

Even after Cordish announced in 2003 it would like to save the theater as part of its Power & Light District, there was one last push to have it demolished.

Developer Larry Bridges wanted to team with DST Realty to build a new headquarters for Kansas City Power & Light on the site. The plan called for saving the facade, but razing the core building. But the city said no.

Then last summer, Cordish announced it had a new partner, AMC Entertainment. The two companies formed a partnership to not only renovate the Empire but redevelop the Midland Theatre, too.

“AMC has been a longtime Kansas City business and very supportive of downtown. Our downtown headquarters are here,” said Frank Rash, senior vice president for strategic development. “(AMC founder) Stan Durwood had a longtime vision for downtown, and this is a chance for us to be part of that.”

In a way, the project already is under construction. Workers from Kingston Environmental began to remove tons of toxic debris from the interior last December and only finished in recent weeks.

Cordish has hired STK Architecture of San Jacinto, Calif., as executive architect. Helix Architecture & Design of Kansas City will assist with historic preservation design.

“Our philosophy is to restore as much as possible, celebrate it in our new design, and at the same time create the most state-of-the-art theater experience in the country,” Cordish said.

The plan calls for two larger auditoriums seating roughly 300 people in each, and four smaller screening rooms with 50 to 100 seats. The main entrance and ticket booth will be under the signature dome. Developers hope to remove floors to reveal the full three-level interior of the rotunda.

The restaurant will occupy the former lobby of the old theater. The idea is to create a place where people can watch movies and discuss them.

“We’re excited as a theater exhibitor to have a facility close to our offices where we can introduce and experiment with new technologies and new programming options,” Rash said.

All six auditoriums will use state-of-the-art digital projection equipment.

“It’s still a novelty, but it’s gaining a lot of momentum,” Rash said.

Developers expect to have the building’s exterior completed as soon as possible so it complements the expected opening of the rest of the Power & Light District next summer.

Cordish and AMC also are moving ahead with the Midland renovation, but that project is far less involved. The preliminary plan calls for a restaurant to go into the front office space, and the theater interior to be tweaked to create a more clublike atmosphere for live music.

“Our emphasis now is on the Mainstreet,” Rash said. “Then we’ll turn out attention to the development of the Midland property.”


Mainstreet Theatre

Then …

•Opened: Oct 30, 1921 as a vaudeville palace with 3,000 seats, the largest in Kansas City until the Midland Theatre opened in 1927.

•Designers: George Leslie Rapp and Cornelius Rapp of Chicago, designers of more than 400 theaters nationwide.

•Cost: About $1.25 million.

…and now

•Open: Early 2008 as a state-of-the-art, six-screen movie house with a restaurant/wine bar.

•Developers: AMC Entertainment of Kansas City and The Cordish Co. of Baltimore.

•Designers: STK Architecture of San Jacinto, Calif., and Helix Architecture & Design of Kansas City.

•Cost: About $25 million.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Madrid Theatre on Jan 2, 2006 at 10:02 pm

I can’t see how the Madrid seated 1500 people in 1926 if the linked photo is a representation of its capacity. It doesn’t look like it had more than 700 seats in the theatre.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Gem Theatre on Jan 2, 2006 at 9:50 pm

The marquee appears to be art deco. Would one say that the building is Colonial Revival?

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Sun Theatre on Jan 2, 2006 at 9:05 pm

Does this theater building still exist, or did Bruce Watkins freeway take it out?

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Rockhill Theatre on Jan 2, 2006 at 9:01 pm

According to Mary Bagley’s book, “The Front Row: Missouri’s Grand Theaters,” the Rockhill seated 762 in the theater and 50 in the balcony. She lists the date of construction as 1918.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Alamo Drafthouse Mainstreet on Jan 2, 2006 at 8:36 pm

The cost of restoration and re-use of the theater has been budgeted at $18 million.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Folly Theater on Jan 2, 2006 at 4:41 am

The Folly Theater Web site (a link is provided above) also shows many current color photos of the interior of this theater.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Alamo Drafthouse Mainstreet on Jan 2, 2006 at 3:32 am

Photos of the interior of the original Empire “Mainstreet” Theater can be found at:

http://cinerama.topcities.com/mainstreet.htm

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Empire Theater Removal Debated on Jan 2, 2006 at 3:02 am

The Empire Theater will not be demolished. AMC has announced plans to spend $18 million to restore the building and convert it into a 6-screen digital theater with around 1,100 seats, and an in-house restaurant and bar. Missouri’s governor has already approved funding through Missouri’s historic tax credit program to help pay for the restoration. The restored theater will be part of the larger Power & Light entertainment district currently under construction next to the new downtown arena, the Sprint Center, and expanded convention center.

The city has purchased the Empire Theater building, and it will be turned over to Midland-Empire Partners LLC for redevelopment. AMC and Power & Light District developer, the Cordish Co. of Baltimore, are joint participants in Midland-Empire Partners. The nearby historic Midland Theater, which was already owned and operated by AMC as a live performance theater, will also be revamped as a live performance theater with restaurant and bar and residential condos in the adjacent Midland Building tower.

Both historic theaters will serve as anchors to the new Power & Light District. Kansas City also retains the nearby Folly and Lyric theaters, and the Music Hall, as live downtown performance spaces. In addition, a new live performance space, the H&R Block Theater, will be constructed in that company’s new headquarters building in the Power & Light District. An outdoor amphitheater will be also constructed on an open-air plaza adjacent to the H&R Block tower.

View link

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Alamo Drafthouse Mainstreet on Dec 31, 2005 at 5:46 pm

The developer, Cordish Co., has committed publically to restoration of the theater.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Alamo Drafthouse Mainstreet on Dec 30, 2005 at 7:09 pm

Recent photos of the deteriorated interior of the Empire are found at this web link:

View link

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about AMC Empire 25 on Nov 10, 2005 at 7:06 pm

I’ve always been surprised that the Loew’s King hasn’t been converted into a live performance theatre. Yes, it probably would have difficulty competing with other venues in Manhattan, but it might be great for niche markets. NYC has a large Spanish-speaking immigrant population. It seems to me that there would be a market for live plays and musical performances done in Spanish for that specific population. I’m sure there are a lot of immigrants that would love to see performances in their native language, and a lot of Spanish-speaking talent from Latin countries that would benefit from having their work seen in NYC. It’s not like there is a lot of that content being exhibited on Broadway.

Yes, it’s sad that the city has landmarked the building, but left it to rot. However, it is up to the surrounding community to rally up and make it known that they want to retain the asset.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Plaza Theater on Jul 18, 2005 at 3:56 am

That’s a great photo of the Plaza Theater Charles. Do any interior remnants remain of the theater auditorium? Did Restoration Hardware renovate/destroy the auditorium space, or does it only occupy what was the old Spanish courtyard portion and lobby space?

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Beekman Theatre on Jan 6, 2005 at 12:21 pm

I used to work in public affairs for one of NYC’s large medical centers. One of the most effective methods of blocking a project of this type, or seeking concessions, is through local neighborhood community boards on the Upper East Side. The groups are very organized and politically active, and have a lot of clout. Many of their members even serve on hospital community advisory boards.

I recall a plan by New York Hospital (back in the 1970s I believe) to build a very tall structure partially over FDR Drive. It would have towered over the neighborhood like a monolith. I believe it was a 40- or 50-story building, which would have been twice the size of the old hospital tower (which is 28 stories I think). Part of the structure would have been on New York Hospital’s existing property, so no neighborhood buildings were threatened.

The neighborhood community boards put a stop to it very quickly, and delayed construction of the new hospital building by almost 25 years. The building that was actually constructed in the mid-90s is 10-stories, and it does extend over FDR Drive as originally planned. However, the neighborhood wasn’t subjected to a looming toward completely over-scaled for the surrounding neighborhood.

It was a good thing this hospital project was delayed for so long. Changes in health care—away from inpatient to outpatient treatment—did away with the need for hospitals to have so many beds. Had that building been built, it would have struggled to fill its beds in today’s health care market. The building would have become a white elephant.

Memorial Sloan Kettering also wanted to tear down a church on the SE corner of First Avenue and 67th streets for a new medical research building. The church had for years provided low-cost on-campus accommodations for patients, and their family members, who were seeking treatment for cancer. I haven’t lived in NYC for three years, so I don’t know the outcome of that plan. Before I left NYC though, there was a campaign to stop demolition of the church.

However, one must realize that Memorial Sloan-Kettering has few options for physical growth. The medical center desperately needs to expand its services, and research space. The need for additional research space is important because it brings in needed federal and state money that subsidizes other hospital operations. It is a non-profit institution that doesn’t have a lot of cash laying around to buy other expensive property.

Often times the solution in this type of situation is a trade. It can be one parcel of land for another. Another solution is to allow the hospital a variance to build a narrower, yet taller, building on a part of the property that can be sacrificed if it will build around the theater.

I know the Beekman is just one part of the property. If I recall, there used to be a bank to the south of the Beekman that was converted into office space for the hospital. Isn’t there also a furniture store on the north side? Is the theater also attached to an apartment building? If MSKCC plans to tear the Beekman down, will it also tear down an attached apartment building?

The other solution is to allow MSKCC to tear down one of the older buildings on its campus and replace it with a much taller structure.

But providing MSKCC with an alternative to that site still doesn’t solve the problem of the low-density of the land on which the Beekman is just a part. Whatever happens, it seems to me that any owner of the property will have to be allowed to build higher than zoning allows on the non-theater part of the property to compensate it for saving the theater.

Wasn’t a much taller apartment building allowed to be constructed around and above the United Artists theater on Third Avenue on one of the 60s blocks?

I can no longer recall if the interior of the theater and the lobby are architecturally-significant in any way. If it’s fairly ordinary, it’s going to be harder to make a case for landmark status. Just because it is a big auditorium with wider seats isn’t going to make the case. One might be able to make a case for saving the unique marquee on the front of the building, and using it as the entrance to a new building. One still loses the theater in that case.

These neighborhood boards are listed on the City’s Web site if I recall. The hospitals fear these groups like the plague, and do anything possible to keep them happy.

I believe that the state has to also approve and issue a certificate of need for any hospital-related project.

In addition to Woody Allen, I know that Arthur Miller lives just a couple of blocks to the north on Second Avenue. I think Jessica Lange and Sam Shepard live nearly on Third Avenue as well.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Beekman Theatre To Close? on Jan 6, 2005 at 10:37 am

Are you sure that New York University owns that property? That doesn’t make sense. It would seem to me that it would be owned by New York Presbyterian Hospital, or Memorial Sloan-Kettering, since they are closer. Many people confuse New York Presbyterian (the old New York Hospital) with New York University Hospital.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about Beekman Theatre on Jan 1, 2005 at 11:47 pm

I’m sad to hear this news, but I’m not surprised. I always realized the value of the real estate on which the theater sat, and worried this day would come. I lived a few blocks from the Beekman when I lived in NYC. I remember seeing George Plimpton, and Arthur Miller (who lived 3 blocks from it), at different times sitting alone watching movies there.

It’s unfortunate that the Beekman wasn’t built with an apartment building over it to begin with, because that might have protected it from the this type of real estate development.

One thing that is (was) great about living in Manhattan was being able to walk to a neighborhood movie house within minutes (usually after a spontaneous decision to go—10 minutes before showtime). There were three small movie theaters within 7 blocks of my apartment (Tower on 72nd, Beekman, and that one across Second Avenue from Beekman near 67th St.). At one time, there was also a small one on Third Avenue near Hunter College that also feel into my 7-block radius).

Single-screen theaters struggle in most cities, but in expensive real estate markets like Manhattan, they are doomed.

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about AMC Empire 25 on Jan 1, 2005 at 11:19 pm

Especially because it’s the only Rapp & Rapp theater in Kansas City.

< http://cinematreasures.org/news/12324_0_1_0_M9 >

< /theaters/4866 >

RobbKCity
RobbKCity commented about AMC Empire 25 on Jan 1, 2005 at 11:12 pm

You know it’s ironic that AMC saved and used the Empire in its redevelopment and creation of the new multiplex on 42nd St. in NYC. Yet, the Empire Theater in Kansas City, which sits four blocks from the AMC headquarters here, sat empty and rotting for since 1986. AMC had owned the Empire here in KC at one time.

Now that the Empire is being restored as part of the new entertainment district being developed here by Cordish, AMC still has no part in the saving of the Empire. All the new residents of renovated downtown buildings constantly dream of having a movie theater downtown again. There’s hope that Cordish will bring a new theater to downtown. It won’t be the Empire, since it’s being restored for use as a live music venue. AMC is willing to spend millions salvaging an old theater in NYC, but hasn’t done the same in its hometown. Especially sad since AMC executives have to drive by the Empire every day.