Comments from Bill Huelbig

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Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jul 23, 2004 at 1:14 pm

I’ll take a guess and say “A Tale of Two Cities” (1935).

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jul 23, 2004 at 11:09 am

To Box Office Bill: Thanks a lot for sharing your memories of the Radio City stage shows. You really describe them well – you have a great memory. I’ve been to about 15 shows there but the only one I can remember featured a stand-up comic during the engagement of “2001” in 1975. One of his jokes was “I’m so old I can remember when the air was clean and sex was dirty”, and nobody laughed, out of the thousands of people that were there. I wish I could have seen some of the shows you talked about instead.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jul 22, 2004 at 1:37 pm

Was Citizen Kane ever shown at the Music Hall in 1941? I know it didn’t have a regular run there for the general public (although it was supposed to at one time), but I think I heard something about a special screening for RKO executives and/or theater owners.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Victoria Theatre on Jul 21, 2004 at 12:44 pm

I watched Midnight Cowboy last night, and there they were: the Astor and Victoria underneath the huge block-long billboard advertising Rex Harrison in Doctor Dolittle.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jul 21, 2004 at 9:54 am

If I had access to the time machine, there are lots of trips I’d be making to the Music Hall: King Kong (1933), The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941), The Yearling (1946), The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947), I Remember Mama (1948), The Nun’s Story and North by Northwest (both 1959) and, from Ron’s list, The Music Man (1962), To Kill a Mockingbird (1963) and Wait Until Dark (1967 – there must’ve been lots of screams echoing throughout the Hall at the end of that one).

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jul 20, 2004 at 2:01 pm

Interesting that Days of Wine and Roses and To Kill a Mockingbird played back to back. If New Yorkers wanted to see some of the best screen performances from the year 1962 (besides Lawrence of Arabia), they had to go to the Music Hall in early 1963.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Astor Theatre on Jul 20, 2004 at 1:35 pm

To add to Box Office Bill’s list, I believe that when It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World ended its year-long Cinerama run at the Warner, it moved to the Victoria, which is where I saw it. Don’t know if this was an exclusive engagement, though – it was probably part of what they called “Premiere Showcase” in those days.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jul 18, 2004 at 6:52 pm

Thanks so much Ron – what a great list and what great memories it triggered. Now I know for sure that the first film I saw at the Music Hall was Bon Voyage, when I always thought it was That Touch of Mink. I was 7 years old for both films. I also got to relive all the films I WANTED to see at the Music Hall but was too young to go see by myself.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Criterion Theatre on Jul 14, 2004 at 10:48 am

Sorry to go off-Criterion for a minute, but here are pictures of the inside of the Hollywood Pacific theater:

View link

To get back to the Criterion, I have good memories of seeing “Tora! Tora! Tora!” “Nicholas and Alexandra” and “Alien” there. And its marquee was always prominently featured on the annual TV coverage of New Year’s Eve in Times Square.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Pacific 1-2-3 on Jul 14, 2004 at 10:14 am

You can read about the Digital Symposium and see pictures of the theater interior here:

View link

It was a pleasure to see the theater where “2001” played in Hollywood for well over a year.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about State-Lake Theater on Jul 9, 2004 at 10:10 am

I feel lucky that I got to see “Return of the Jedi” at the State-Lake on my only visit to Chicago in June 1983. I had no idea it had been torn down. The only sad thing about my visit was that there were only about 10 people in that huge theater, and the movie had just opened about a month before.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about George W. Newman Theatre on Jul 9, 2004 at 9:53 am

They had a great old-fashioned marquee which was hit by a truck sometime after 1966, when the theater featured the exclusive area showing of “The Sound of Music” for most of that year. They replaced the marquee with a smaller, abstract red one that didn’t hold any letters – a big disappointment compared to the one they had.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about George W. Newman Theatre on Jul 9, 2004 at 9:35 am

My family moved to Rutherford when I was 8, and I spent an incredible amount of time in the Rivoli. The first time I ever went to a movie all by myself was there: “The Great Escape” in 1963. Nowadays my friends who have kids would never dream of sending an 8-year-old to the movies alone. I guess it is a much different world.

One of the highlights out of the hundreds of movies I saw there: “A Hard Day’s Night” in 1964, with big speakers installed in the back of the theater for that engagement only, and the teenage girls in the audience screaming for The Beatles as if it were a live concert.

Thanks, Warren, for posting all the facts about it. I can still see that chandelier in my mind …

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Darress Theater on Jul 7, 2004 at 7:52 am

In 2000, I saw The Day the Earth Stood Still here, and Patricia Neal made a personal appearance. Her opening line was a classic: “Where the hell am I?” I guess Boonton is kind of off the beaten track even for New Jersey.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Paramus Picture Show on Jul 6, 2004 at 12:10 pm

When The Exorcist first played New Jersey six months after it opened its exclusive runs in New York City, it played here. I think it was called Cinema 35 then. The line to get in was probably the biggest ever seen in Paramus up to that time, at least until Star Wars came to town.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Best Buy Theater on Jul 6, 2004 at 8:11 am

Vito: thanks for always putting on the best possible show at the theaters you worked in. Wouldn’t it be great if today’s theater owners and projectionists showed the same kind of dedication that you did?

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Best Buy Theater on Jul 6, 2004 at 7:39 am

I agree with YankeeMike, especially if they pay tribute to the height of this theater’s glory days and show the original “Star Wars”.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Bellevue Cinema 4 on Jul 5, 2004 at 8:00 pm

Last Friday night I went to a fireworks display in Montclair. I took the train, and the station was a block away from the Bellevue. As I walked toward the theater on my way home, I imagined myself as one of Rod Serling’s characters in The Twilight Zone who gets transported back in time. Maybe when I approached the Bellevue, it would somehow be 1961 again and “West Side Story” would be playing in 70mm in its exclusive North Jersey engagement. Unfortunately, I did not go into the Twilight Zone and the marquee did not say “West Side Story” but “Harry Potter”, “The Terminal” and two others. OK, it didn’t happen this time, but maybe it will happen in the future, maybe when I visit the New York City block where the Loew’s Capitol once stood? :)

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Best Buy Theater on Jul 5, 2004 at 7:47 pm

On Saturday morning I went to the Astor Plaza for what looks like the last time, to see Spider-Man 2. I sat in the balcony to get the full effect of that huge expanse of seats in front of me. And when the credits were over, I stayed to watch the curtains close on the last big single-theater screen in Times Square. It was as if the curtains were closing on a part of New York movie history. Now the Ziegfeld is literally the last of a dying breed, and more precious than ever.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Film Forum on Jul 1, 2004 at 12:11 pm

Peter K.: I also saw “Fantasia” at Radio City Music Hall in May 1978. I remember the huge audience applauding at the end of each musical segment – what a wonderful sound that was.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Film Forum on Jul 1, 2004 at 11:54 am

I think the drive-in speaker survived intact, but the car window sure didn’t! Another memory of that movie: Joan Crawford got star billing, but I think she was in it for about 10 minutes total.

Talking about the Biograph and the Hollywood reminds me of the Elgin Cinema, which was down around 19th St. It wasn’t the cleanest theater and it always had a funny smell, but they sure showed some great classic movies. The first time I saw “The Birds” in a theater was there – same with “Nights of Cabiria”.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Film Forum on Jul 1, 2004 at 3:39 am

“I Saw What You Did” will always live in my memory as the movie where my dad drove out of a drive-in theater with the speaker still attached to the window. It was the summer of ‘65 like Peter K. said, in Rutherford, NJ. I don’t think he liked the movie, and I guess he wanted to get away from it as quickly as possible.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Film Forum on Jun 30, 2004 at 1:44 pm

Maybe it has to do with the number of seats in the theater? I always thought Film Forum 1 had the most seats, but that might be an optical illusion because the theater is wider than the other two. If a repertory film is really popular, maybe it gets moved over to theater #1 so they can sell more tickets.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Film Forum on Jun 30, 2004 at 1:29 pm

Come to think of it, I saw McCabe and Mrs. Miller and La Dolce Vita in Film Forum 1 a few years ago. But Vincent is right: they should show all the scope films in that theater.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig commented about Film Forum on Jun 30, 2004 at 12:49 pm

I loved the old Film Forum on Watts St. – the Gimmick-O-Rama festival was a real dream come true – and when they announced the move to a new theater, my hopes were high. I was disappointed to see the new theaters' screen size, and the narrow shape of the auditoriums themselves as opposed to the wider ones in the old building. Film Forum 1 has an actual wide screen, but I don’t think they ever show the repertory titles in there. On the other hand, the fact that Film Forum exists at all is one of the best things about New York City. I only hope they bring Gimmick-O-Rama back someday.