Roxy Theatre

153 W. 50th Street,
New York, NY 10020

Unfavorite 74 people favorited this theater

Showing 176 - 200 of 1,385 comments

Joseph
Joseph on March 29, 2011 at 11:05 am

One of the individual’s directly responsible for the ROXY’s demise:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Zeckendorf

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on March 29, 2011 at 7:41 am

Today marks the 51st anniversary of one of the most tragic events in movie palace history— the closure of the Roxy Theatre, which was quickly demolished that summer and replaced by an office building. The final movie was 20th-Fox’s British-made “The Wind Cannot Read.” Stage shows had been eliminated earlier in the year. No organized efforts were made to save the Roxy, which shuttered forever less than three weeks after the 33rd anniversary of its 1927 opening.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on March 25, 2011 at 8:54 am

Fifty-eight years ago today, the Roxy opened its 1953 Easter Show with a double serving of the great songwriter Irving Berlin. On screen in its world premiere engagement was 20th-Fox’s Technicolor version of Berlin’s “Call Me Madam,” with Ethel Merman in the role she created in the smash hit Broadway musical. On its Ice-Colorama Radiant Ice Rink, the Roxy presented “Melody Time,” a tribute by the resident Skating Blades & Belles to Irving Berlin’s many evergreens, including “Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” “Always,” “Easter Parade,” “Blue Skies,” “A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody,” “White Christmas,” and “There’s No Business Like Show Business.”

Joseph
Joseph on March 19, 2011 at 6:10 am

RE: On this day in 1959, the Roxy opened what proved to be its final Easter holiday package, with Howard Hawks' Technicolor western, “Rio Bravo,” on screen. John Wayne, Dean Martin, and Ricky Nelson starred in the Warner Brothers release, with Angie Dickinson, Walter Brennan, Ward Bond, and John Russell featured. On its truncated stage, the Roxy presented “Spring Fever,” starring Dorothy Keller, with support from Earl Hall, the Roxy Singers & Dancers Moderne, and the Roxy Orchestra under conductor Robert Boucher. That year, the Roxy’s competition from Radio City Music Hall consisted of MGM’s “Green Mansions,” with Audrey Hepburn and Anthony Perkins, and a two-part stage revue including the sacred “Glory of Easter” and the secular “Spring Parade

It appears the ROXY had the better movie for Easter 1959.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on March 18, 2011 at 7:52 am

On this day in 1959, the Roxy opened what proved to be its final Easter holiday package, with Howard Hawks' Technicolor western, “Rio Bravo,” on screen. John Wayne, Dean Martin, and Ricky Nelson starred in the Warner Brothers release, with Angie Dickinson, Walter Brennan, Ward Bond, and John Russell featured. On its truncated stage, the Roxy presented “Spring Fever,” starring Dorothy Keller, with support from Earl Hall, the Roxy Singers & Dancers Moderne, and the Roxy Orchestra under conductor Robert Boucher. That year, the Roxy’s competition from Radio City Music Hall consisted of MGM’s “Green Mansions,” with Audrey Hepburn and Anthony Perkins, and a two-part stage revue including the sacred “Glory of Easter” and the secular “Spring Parade.”

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on March 14, 2011 at 8:55 am

Fifty-nine years ago today, 20th-Fox’s B&W “Deadline, U.S.A.,” writer-director Richard Brooks' gritty thriller about the newspaper world starring Humphrey Bogart, Ethel Barrymore, and Kim Hunter, opened its NYC premiere engagement at the Roxy Theatre. Hollywood singing-and-dancing star Gloria DeHaven topped the stage show, with support from the Norma Miller Dancers, juggler Veronica Martell, the comedy team of Noonan & Marshall, and the resident Gae Foster Roxyettes, H.L. Spitalny Singers, and Roxy Orchestra.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on March 13, 2011 at 1:19 pm

Here’s a link to 1938 newsreel footage showing the resident Gae Foster Girls rehearsing outdoors on the Roxy Theatre’s roof: View link

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on March 11, 2011 at 6:57 am

Eighty-four years ago tonight, the Roxy Theatre had its grand opening with the Gloria Swanson starrer, “The Love of Sunya,” on screen, and a spectacular stage show designed by the theatre’s founder and namesake. Tragically, the Roxy survived for only 33 years (most with a stage/film policy), and has been missing from the New York scene for just over half a century. What a loss!

Joseph
Joseph on March 6, 2011 at 4:40 pm

crowds of people attending a demonstation of CinemaScope at the ROXY:

View link

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on March 6, 2011 at 1:24 pm

“Halls of Montezuma” also introduced Roxy audiences to newcomer Robert Wagner, who would become a fsmiliar face there due to his contract with 20th Century-Fox, its principal screen supplier. At least a dozen of Wagner’s 20th-Fox films opened at the Roxy, most notably “With a Song in My Heart,” “Stars and Stripes Forever,” “Titanic,” “Beneath the 12 Mile Reef,” “Prince Valiant,” and “Broken Lance.”

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on March 6, 2011 at 12:54 pm

The Roxy Theatre came full circle with “Halls of Montezuma.” In 1942, 20th-Fox’s Technicolored “To the Shores of Tripoli” also opened there. The two titles are forever linked in the lyrics to the official hymn of the U.S. Marine Corps.

Joseph
Joseph on March 6, 2011 at 10:53 am

Footage from the HALLS OF MONTEZUMA premiere:

View link

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on February 11, 2011 at 8:14 am

Fifty-eight years ago today, the Roxy presented the first animated feature in its history, Walt Disney’s Technicolor version of “Peter Pan,” in a special “pre-release engagement.” Supplementing the screen bill was Disney’s live-action short, “Bear Country.” And on the Roxy’s radiant “Ice Colorama” stage, the new revue was entitled “Crystal Wonderland” and featured the resident Roxy Skating Blades & Belles in addition to specialty acts. Advertising claimed that this was “Wonderful ADULT entertainment that the whole family will love.” Tickets for children under twelve were 50 cents at all times.

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on February 6, 2011 at 11:00 am

Thanks for the info Tinseltoes.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on February 6, 2011 at 8:46 am

Seventy years ago today, 20th-Fox’s Technicolor adaptation of Zane Grey’s “Western Union” opened its world premiere engagement at the Roxy Theatre. Directed by Fritz Lang, the outdoor epic starred Robert Young, Randolph Scott, Dean Jagger, and Virginia Gilmore. Topping the Roxy’s stage show was the popular vocal group known as The Smoothies, supported by Jeanne Brideson, Bob DuPont, Marie Hollis, the Gae Foster Girls, and the Roxy Orchestra under Paul Ash…The booking was part of a “Shoot-Out on West 50th Street,” with nearby Radio City Music Hall also opening a super-western on the same day— Columbia’s B&W “Arizona,” with Jean Arthur, William Holden, and Warren William under Wesley Ruggles' direction. Leonidoff’s stage revue, “The Last Time I Saw Paris,” had five spectacular scenes inspired by the hit song by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II.

CConnolly1
CConnolly1 on February 4, 2011 at 4:55 am

View link

A very interesting image from the Museum of the City of NY archives. This shows the foundations of the Roxy as it was being constructed. You can clearly see the diagonal layout that has been mentioned many times on this site.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on February 1, 2011 at 7:40 am

Here’s a link to a marquee view from the Roxy’s disastrous 1958 engagement of “Windjammer” in the Cinemiracle process: http://cinerama.topcities.com/roxycinemiracle.htm

BillSavoy
BillSavoy on January 24, 2011 at 3:13 pm

Thanks so much for sharing your memories! I own 6 programs from 1938, but unfortunately, not your’s! I’ll keep searching!
Bill
P.S.: What was it like working for Fanchon & Marco?

clairebg23
clairebg23 on January 24, 2011 at 9:50 am

I danced at the Roxy in 1938, military number,movie was A Yank in the RAF. I returned four years later as a regular Gae Foster Girl. Had to leave due to illness but have wonderful memories of my short but fulfilling career at the Roxy. This site brought back many happy memories.

shanvdk
shanvdk on January 22, 2011 at 6:44 pm

Oh, and I’m thinking the gentleman I was looking for was probably closer to his early 50’s around that time. I’ll still check into it though :)

shanvdk
shanvdk on January 22, 2011 at 6:41 pm

Thanks Bill! I will look into it. You never know were it might lead me. In the meantime keep passin along the info bc every bit helps. Thanks agin for taking the time to help me out :)

BillSavoy
BillSavoy on January 22, 2011 at 5:37 pm

Dear Shanvdk, A shot in the dark: When I was an usher at Radio City Music Hall (1969-73), LEO Doughtery was the kindly, old, (70+) 50th -Street stage doorman (“Pops”). A million Doughtery’s in the the Naked City … but, you never know …!
Still working on it,
Bill!

BillSavoy
BillSavoy on January 22, 2011 at 3:36 pm

Dear Shanvdk, Sorry, no luck yet in finding Jim Dougherty. Don’t give up hope … you’d be amazed what Roxy factsI I can find, give the time!

BillSavoy
BillSavoy on January 22, 2011 at 3:30 pm

Lew White recorded organ music from the Roxy in 1927-28 for the Brunswick label. Unfortunately they were played on the 2-manual instrument in the broadcasting studio (not the auditorium’s) and are definately lackluster (compared to Jesse Crawford’s Victor, Paramount Theatre recordings from the same era). There were only a dozen or so made and occasionally come up on EBAY. The label must read: “Recorded at Roxy Theatre, N.Y.” otherwise, they read: “Recorded at "Lew White Organ Studio, N.Y.”… Know the difference! They are not great, but for Roxy historians, are a must! A recording also exists of “Teddy Bear’s Picnic”, recorded by Ben Hall ca. 1958-9 (I don’t own it, nor know where to get a copy). By that time the organ was piped through a P.A system and sounded
like “death-warmed-over”… but, again, a must for Roxy or theatre organ fans. Try contacting the “AMERICAN THEATRE ORGAN SOCIETY” Good luck!
Bill Savoy (508 612 5669)

Good luck!

moviebear1
moviebear1 on January 22, 2011 at 2:31 pm

Does anyone know if there are any recordings of the Roxy theatre Organ? I would love to hear what it sounded like.