Comments from Edward Havens

Showing 176 - 199 of 199 comments

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Embassy 1,2,3 Theatre on Jul 2, 2007 at 12:08 am

It would be really great for those of us who either no longer live in New York City or have never had the chance to visit this once-great theatre to see some pictures of what is currently happening. Thank you very much in advance.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Galaxy 3 on May 22, 2007 at 9:38 pm

I guess one could say I was biased, since I managed the competition down the street, but when I was at the Fox Watsonville in the late 1990s, the Galaxy had become a real junkhole. The place was poorly operated, the booth had home stereo equipment jerry-rigged into the sound racks so they could say their films were in Dolby Stereo and the seats were horribly uncomfortable. I only ever saw one movie at the Galaxy, the original Men In Black, sometime during its opening week. (I have no idea to this day why the Fox, with its 50ft main auditorium screen with DTS Digital Sound, did not open the film.) The number one movie in America, on an early Monday evening, and I was the only person in the theatre watching the film.

The Galaxy didn’t die because of the opening of the Green Valley 8, although I am certain it didn’t help. The Galaxy died because no one went there. Why would they, when they had a grand old theatre like the Fox?

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Fox Theatre on May 22, 2007 at 9:21 pm

On the KSCO website, there is a report from September 2006 which reports the Fox being in escrow, about to sell to a firm owned by Mark Calvano for $2.25M.

http://www.ksco.com/dspNR.cfm?nrid=7576

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Del Mar Theatre on Jul 23, 2006 at 6:02 pm

Alan Lopez needed to do a little bit more research before publishing his article.

As a teenager in Santa Cruz in the early to mid 1980s who eventually became an assistant manager at the Del Mar in the mid to late 1980s, I can say with a fair degree of certainty that the Del Mar was not a second run theatre during the time I regularly visited or worked there, and was far from being on “hard times” during my watch. I still remember with some fondness and annoyance having to come up with new and exciting ways to trumpet our seemingly never-ending run of “‘Crocodile’ Dundee” in the daily Sentinel newpaper ads, which played first-run at the Del Mar for more than half a year.

UA had their own way of booking their Santa Cruz theatres in the 1980s. The Rio got the expected blockbusters, the Riverfront got the second-level hits, the 41st Avenue Playhouse got the critical and expected award-winners and the Del Mar got the workhorses. (The Aptos Twin was its own conundrum.) It might not have always given the Del Mar the greatest films all of the time, but the theatre wasn’t going for lacking with long first-run plays for films like “Ferris Bueller,” “Star Trek IV” and “Dirty Dancing.”

Now that I live in Los Angeles, I haven’t been to the Del Mar since before the Nick gang took it over. I look forward to checking the old home out in its new splendor.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about NYC's Ziegfeld offers an exclusive... with a price tag to match on Dec 18, 2005 at 4:19 pm

I’ll take a movie at the Chinese or the Cinerama Dome any day over the Ziegfeld. But in the years I was in New York City, I didn’t have those choices. And, slowly but surely, all my other choices were disappearing. The Baronet and Coronet closed just days after I moved. (Yes, I moved to New York City the weekend before 9/11.) Then the Murray Hill closed, before I ever got to visit. Then the Sutton closed shortly after the one time I saw a film there. Then the Astor Plaza, after many visits. Then the Beekman, just before I moved back to Los Angeles.

Granted, I never got to visit the Roxy or the original State or the Loews or the Palace or any of the other grand palaces. (Nor did I ever get to visit the Bleecker or the original Film Forum.)

Point is, if the Ziegfeld becomes, by default, the best theatre in town… well, you be thankful you still have the Ziegfeld, which clearly has had its problems over the years. I’d hate to think of going back to New York City someday and seeing the best theatre left in town is the Lincoln Square or the E-Walk or the Empire 25.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about UA Galaxy on Dec 17, 2005 at 7:21 am

This was in the Balboa Theatre newsletter sent out last night by Gary Meyer, co-founder of the Landmark chain…


BREAKING NEWS- R.I.P. Galaxy Theatre

It wasn’t my favorite theater but the large screens at the Galaxy offered a pretty good show before the megaplexes opened in SF. The Galaxy was built in 1984 on Van Ness at Sutter. The Regency I & II across the street were among the hottest theaters in town (along with the Northpoint and Coronet). UATC wanted to make a statement with an architecturally interesting building and “state-of-the art” cinemas featuring THX sound and be located in this important location. No major new theaters had opened in San Francisco in years. The theater did well but never spectacularly. But when the Regencys closed, unable to compete against the Metreon and AMC 1000, the corner lost its luster and the Galaxy had a tough time getting movies. They attempted to be an “art cinema” but had to be content with the leftovers. With no marketing person on-site to promote the concept, and a rather programming schizophrenic approach, there was no sense of place.

Rent was very high and the landlord wouldn’t let them close or leave. Finally a deal has been worked out and last night the Galaxy quietly closed. Today’s Movie Guides suggest you call for show times but it just rings. Theatre ghosts don’t answer the phone.


It wasn’t my favorite theatre, either. The one time I went there was for a private screening of The Abyss. The sound and picture were fine, but I much preferred the #1 house at the Kabuki to anything there.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Ziegfeld Theatre on Dec 16, 2005 at 8:15 am

Sorry, SteveBob, but no one is pretending the Ziegfeld is anything more than it is. The last large single-screen cinema left in Manhattan.

I’ll repeat what I said in this comment section back in March of this year:

“So the Ziegfeld isn’t the greatest theatre that ever existed. So what? I’m 37 and most of the greatest theatres that did exist were torn down or mutilated in some way before I was born. Nothing I can do about that. A palace it may not be, but for what’s left in this city, I’ll take the Ziegfeld or the Beekman as many times as I can as long as they’re still here.”

Granted, the Beekman is gone, I’m now 38 and I’ve since moved back to Los Angeles, but the Ziegfeld was still a hell of a place to see a movie.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about NYC's Ziegfeld offers an exclusive... with a price tag to match on Dec 16, 2005 at 8:15 am

Sorry, SteveBob, but no one is pretending the Ziegfeld is anything more than it is. The last large single-screen cinema left in Manhattan.

I’ll repeat what I said in the Ziegfeld’s comments section back in March of this year:

“So the Ziegfeld isn’t the greatest theatre that ever existed. So what? I’m 37 and most of the greatest theatres that did exist were torn down or mutilated in some way before I was born. Nothing I can do about that. A palace it may not be, but for what’s left in this city, I’ll take the Ziegfeld or the Beekman as many times as I can as long as they’re still here.”

Granted, the Beekman is gone, I’m now 38 and I’ve since moved back to Los Angeles, but the Ziegfeld was still a hell of a place to see a movie.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Fox Venice Theater on Dec 4, 2005 at 9:09 pm

The one and only time I ever made it to the Fox Venice was in late 1985. I had just moved back to Los Angeles to attend college, and I was listening to KROQ, as all teens were required to at the time. So one night, there was a call-in contest to win tickets to a sneak preview of something called “Grunt: The Wrestling Movie” which would be playing the following evening at the Fox Venice. Never one to turn down the chance for a free movie, I called in… and I won. While the movie was pretty bad, the theatre (which also had a video store catering to more independent films in one of store fronts with a common door between the store and the theatre) was inspiring. As I lived and went to school in Long Beach at the time, I did not make many trips to Venice, so it would be years before I ended up driving down Lincoln Boulevard again. By that time, it had become the lousy indoor flea market it is now. Blech.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Ziegfeld Theatre on Nov 22, 2005 at 4:29 am

Well, I’ve seen Rent and The Producers, and both films are extremely entertaining. The Ziegfeld will be a glorious place to experience both.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Beekman Theatre on Jul 3, 2005 at 4:27 am

That’s funny… I live at 84th and Third, and there are a number of places to eat after midnight around here.

Alas, I went by the Beekman last night, on the way to the ImaginAsian Theatre for a screening, and it was sad to see this grand dame already in a state of disrepair. The beautiful box office had already been removed, a plain and ugly metal desk now sitting in its place. The north facing marquee, as seen in several of DaveBazooka’s photos, has already been partially dismantled, so it now reads TH CL. Thankfully, I was on the M15, so I only saw this for about twenty seconds.

Sad. Very sad.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Bleecker Street Cinemas on Apr 19, 2005 at 11:07 am

It should also be noted the Bleecker Street helped create the cult of “The Toxic Avenger,” by picking the film up for Saturday midnight screenings when no other theatre (in town or around the country) would touch the film.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Fox Theatre on Apr 4, 2005 at 9:09 am

The main auditorium featured a fifty foot screen and 500 seats. The two balcony theatres sat 105 and 80 respectively.

Unfortunately, the Fox Theatre was closed on March 28, 2005. An article in the Santa Cruz Sentinel about the closing can be found at View link

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Sutton Theater on Mar 23, 2005 at 11:10 am

I have some older New Yorkers laying about, so I can list some of the movies that played the Sutton on those weeks…

7/8/1967: The Jokers (Michael Winner)
2/24/1968: Charlie Bubbles (Albert Finney)
6/28/1969: The Loves of Isadora (Karel Reisz)
11/11/1975: Hearts of the West (Howard Zieff)
11/18/1975: One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (Milos Forman) Premiere
11/7/1980: Private Benjamin (Howard Zieff)
11/14/1980: Raging Bull (Martin Scorsese)
Premiere
11/16/1990: #1 – Fantasia, #2 – Tune In Tomorrow… (Jon Amiel)
11/21/1990: #1 – Three Men and a Little Lady (Emile Ardolino), #2 – Tune In Tomorrow… (Jon Amiel)
6/21/1991: #1 and #2 – The Rocketeer (Joe Johnston)
9/6/1991: #1 – Doc Hollywood (Michael Caton-Jones), #2 – True Identity (Charles Lane)
9/18/1991: #1 – Doc Hollywood, #2 – The Doctor (Randa Haines)
10/24/1991: #1 – Shattered (Wolfgang Petersen), #2 – Twenty-One (Don Boyd)
11/1/1991: #1 – Year of the Gun (John Frankenheimer), #2 – Iron Maze (Hiroaki Yoshida)

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Paris Theatre on Mar 21, 2005 at 2:54 pm

I’ve only been to the Paris once, to see “Amelie” with my wife, but it is one of my favorite theatres. The Paris proves that a theatre need not be massive to be a palace.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about City Cinemas Cinema 1, 2, and 3 on Mar 21, 2005 at 2:52 pm

In Xan Cassavetes' documentary about LA’s Z Channel cable service from the 1970s and 1980s, there is some news footage from opening day of “Heavens Gate” at the 1, 2, 3. Growing up in Los Angeles, I used to feel cheated that New York City had all these great movie theatres, and get all the best movies first.

When I finally moved to New York City in 2001, I went to the 1, 2, 3 to see “I Am Sam.” While the movie wasn’t all that good, the theatre it played in was horrid. The tiny one, where I couldn’t hear half of the dialogue because the first “Lord of the Rings” movie was playing in the main theatre and the sound was cranked up to 11. The seats were in various states of disrepair, the screen masking atrocious and the aperature plate cut so wrong that part of the movie was playing on the ceiling.

Three and a half years later, I have yet to go back, and I live up the street from the theatre. If this was a great theatre before, I never would have known it in these modern times.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Ziegfeld Theatre on Mar 21, 2005 at 2:43 pm

So the Ziegfeld isn’t the greatest theatre that ever existed. So what? I’m 37 and most of the greatest theatres that did exist were torn down or mutilated in some way before I was born. Nothing I can do about that. A palace it may not be, but for what’s left in this city, I’ll take the Ziegfeld or the Beekman as many times as I can as long as they’re still here.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Coronet Theatre Will Close On Feb 10th on Feb 4, 2005 at 8:51 am

Ah, progress! :(

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Beekman Theatre To Close? on Dec 29, 2004 at 10:45 am

I am saddened… not so much that the Beekman would be closing (which would very much be a horrible loss to New York cinema), but at my own lack of surprise hearing this announcement. So many older non-megaplex theatres have closed in the past few years here, what’s one more?

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Art Theatre on Nov 23, 2004 at 8:03 am

When I was a young'un growing up in Long Beach, The Art was where I had my education in cinema. I would regularly shop at Dodd’s Book Store on Second Street, on my way home from school (despite the store being many blocks off my route) to get the latest calendar of films scheduled to play, which I would tack up on my bedroom wall next to my desk. It may have had a tiny lobby and a rinky-dink popcorn popper, but The Art was like a second home between the ages of nine and fourteen, where an impressionable lad could catch the likes of The Ruling Class and Harold and Maude, films that still remain favorites nearly thirty years on. Should I ever live in Los Angeles again, I will make an effort to support The Art with my patronage no matter what part of the area I live in, as I last did when I lived there in the late 1990s. So many fond memories.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Castro Theatre on Oct 1, 2004 at 3:26 pm

Despite growing up in Santa Cruz and spending much time in the city over the years, the one and only time I ever made it to the Castro was for the 1996 70mm restoration of Alfred Hitchcock’s “Vertigo.” It was one of the five best theatre experiences of my life.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Parmatown Mall Cinemas on Aug 24, 2004 at 9:24 am

Growing up in Los Angeles, I would often be shipped off to Cleveland for the summer to spend time with my grandparents, who lived a couple blocks from Parmatown. Although it’s been twentysomething years since I was last at Parmatown, I still have fond memories of seeing movies like The Apple Dumpling Gang there. I’m saddened to see another relic of my past gone.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Monterey's State Theatre Being Sold on Aug 15, 2004 at 7:17 pm

Back in 1989, I trained as a theatre manager at the State and its sister theatre, the Regency. And although I am no longer in the theatre game, and live in New York City now, I would make a trip to Monterey to see a restored single screen State theatre.

Edward Havens
Edward Havens commented about Northpoint Theatre on Jun 25, 2004 at 12:37 pm

One of the best movie moments of my life was seeing “The Last Temptation of Christ” at the Northpoint, the first show on opening day in August 1988. Not just the movie, which I felt was a masterpiece, but the surrounding protests and the media circus that followed. My friends and I got to the theatre six hours before the first show, driving up from Santa Cruz, only to discover there was already a small line in place, at 5AM. By 9AM, the line for the movie went down Powell Street and turned east at Francisco Street, while hundreds of protestors filled the intersection of Bay and Powell. Several protestors assured me that God was going to strike upon the theatre with all his holy vengeance just before the start of the show, sending the theatre and all us heathens inside straight into the bowels of hell. I’m glad it didn’t happen, as I would have hated to miss seeing myself and my friends on every news channel in the Bay Area.