Loew's Jersey Theatre

54 Journal Square,
Jersey City, NJ 07306

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Showing 201 - 225 of 1,405 comments

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on September 15, 2010 at 1:24 pm

3rd Season? We have been running classic films every fall/winter/spring since December of 2001.

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on September 15, 2010 at 11:07 am

Got an e-mail today from Friends of the Loews about their 3rd.Season? Schedule,looks like they are back in action.

GDellaFa
GDellaFa on September 10, 2010 at 6:02 pm

The partial Fall schedule is available now:

http://loewsjersey.org/

GDellaFa
GDellaFa on August 26, 2010 at 6:01 pm

In my humble opinion, this film also deserves to be shown at the Loew’s Jersey Theatre:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dgpfMxYFSmE

Truly an amazing film.

The Loew’s has so much going for it. The venue is very nearly unique in its ability to show vintage movies, and it is so close to New York. What a combination!!

Bolorkay is right. The Friend’s of the Loew’s deserve the highest amount of praise in bringing this great movie palace back to life. I can’t wait to see the new improvements as they come along.

I’m sure I’ve mentioned that the Loew’s Jersey was my home town movie theatre in the 1960s-1980s. I’m spoiled for life. Multi-plex, shmulti-plex. Bah!

GDellaFa
GDellaFa on August 26, 2010 at 5:50 pm

Pity is wasn’t shown. Any good Technicolor movie looks just amazing on the Loew’s Jersey screen. When a film takes real advantage of the medium, I would think that the effect of showing it on the Loew’s Jersey screen with the carbon arc projectors would be truly spectacular. With the proper publicity, this film would fill the house—no question. Such a presentation is an all too rare and almost unique experience today.

GDellaFa
GDellaFa on August 25, 2010 at 6:46 pm

Thanks for the information, Rob. Too bad that they were cut back then , but thank goodness more harm wasn’t done to the auditorium at that time.

Have you ever considered showing this movie? I would love to see this on the big screen with those carbon arc projectors:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTIgbXtRW4I

It certainly would be flattering to what you’ve got in the Loew’s.

Just a thought.

RobMinichino
RobMinichino on August 12, 2010 at 9:59 am

The long swags were cut, probably in the 50s for CinemaScope, and we didn’t find them in the building. When the fabrics are replaced as part of the restoration (well into the future), we will likely recreate them and rig them to fly out to widen the proscenium when needed.

We’re still deciding on the fall films; we’ll post to the web site as soon as we know our titles. The dates of our film weekends should be posted soon.

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on August 11, 2010 at 1:37 pm

Thanks Gabe I just remember they are closed due to no air.Reopen in September.

GDellaFa
GDellaFa on June 20, 2010 at 2:46 pm

Here are some interesting photos!: http://loewsjersey.org/alt/

The house pelmet has been lowered and is being cleaned.

Does anyone know if the side house swag curtains still exist and if there are any plans to re-hang them? (The stage would look a lot better if they were re-installed.) Please tell me they still exist…

bolorkay
bolorkay on June 11, 2010 at 5:27 am

I think “gallion”’s phrase about the Loew’s in Newark really says it all when it come to the great Landmark Loew’s Jersey..

“The site is now a parking lot.” !!!!!
All of us who love these old movie palaces owe a resounding “thank you” to Mr. Egan and “The Friends of the Loew’s” (I’m sure they’d love to hear this as well from all of the audience members at each monthly film program.)

In a totally different direction……
– (I know it’s a bit early, but…) Any idea when the Fall Film Programs will be announced ?

russellgallion
russellgallion on June 7, 2010 at 10:04 pm

I was asst mgr here in 1951-52. Jim Kolbeck was the manager.
Oher assistants were Sully Sullivan and Joe Weiner. We were open
around 10am with last show out around 1am. On weekend evenings
we often had full house with two box offices operating at peak.
Mr Egan deserves all kinds of credit in keeping this treasure alive.
I feel very lucky to have been part of the history of this, one of the truly
magnificent movie palaces. By the way I read that Jerry Lewis was an usher
here when in his teens. According to Mr Lewis he worked at Loews State
in Newark in the early 40s. I also was asst mgr there, after leaving Loews
Jersey. Loews in Newark, while not as grand as the Jersey, was also quite
beautiful. The site is now a parking lot.
by Gallion 6/7/10

RobMinichino
RobMinichino on June 6, 2010 at 2:11 pm

That’s not entirely accurate. While we do reduce the height of the image for scope, we also increase the width. The screen areas used for 1.85 and 2.39 are close, with 2.39 ever so slightly bigger, with the 1.85 image at 41'x22' and the 2.39 image at 20'x47'. The lenses we have for 70mm will make it (appropriately) our largest format, at 22.5'x49.5'.

We remain constrained by the width of the proscenium, at exactly 50' plaster to plaster. A larger screen would require a screen frame in front of the proscenium, which, while possible, is impractical for the current and future uses of the theatre.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on June 1, 2010 at 12:33 pm

This is where I get to say that the 1.85:1 image is bigger than the 2.39:1.

RobMinichino
RobMinichino on June 1, 2010 at 10:59 am

We mask all formats appropriately. Our screen and proscenium have a 2:1 aspect ratio, and we project all formats at the maximum possible size (side masking for silent, 1.37:1, and 1.85:1, and top masking for 2.39:1).

Mikeoaklandpark
Mikeoaklandpark on June 1, 2010 at 10:46 am

A question for my curiosity. Do they have masking for the screen for films not filmed in scope?

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on June 1, 2010 at 9:10 am

[size=4][color=red]The Landmark Loews Jersey â€" The Wonder Theatre Of New Jersey[/color][/size]

This coming weekend of June 4th and 5th, The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre located on Journal Square in Jersey City, New Jersey, concludes its 80th Birthday Jubilee and 10th consecutive year of classic films. All this season, we have been saluting the decades that the Landmark Loews Jersey has been entertaining us. For June, we will be presenting some great classic films from the 1980’s.

Located directly across from the PATH subway station connecting Manhattan with Jersey City, it is also easy to reach from most area highways. Secure discounted parking is located directly behind the theatre. Have your parking ticket validated at the theatre’s boxoffice.

All Show Are Presented In 35mm With Genuine Carbon Arc Projection On Our Giant 50 Foot Wide Screen.

Friday June 4th at 8:00pm â€" Raging Bull (1980)

Starring Robert De Niro, Cathy Moriarty, Joe Pesci, Frank Vincent, Nicholas Colasanto. Directed by Martin Scorsese. (128mins., Rated: R)

Martin Scorsese’s brutal character study incisively portrays the rise, fall and redemption of real-life middleweight boxer Jake La Motta, a violent man in and out of the ring who seemed to thrive on his ability and willingness to take a beating. Opening with the spectacle of the over-the-hill La Motta (Robert De Niro) practicing his 1960s night-club act, the film flashes back to 1940s New York when Jake’s career is on the rise. But Scorsese and De Niro eschew uplifting, “Rocky”-like, boxing movie conventions to make an unflinching portrait of an unlikable man and his ruthless profession. Their Jake is relentlessly cruel and self-destructive, a person whose inner demons cannot be exorcised even by acclaim and success. The physical brutality that makes Jake a champion in the boxing ring cripples his relationships with his wives, his business associates, and his brother.

Saturday June 5th at 6:00pm â€" Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985)

Starring Paul Reubens, Elizabeth Daily, Mark Holton, Diane Salinger. Directed by Tim Burton.
(90mins, Rated: PG)

Tim Burton made his feature-length directorial debut with this film, and immediately established what would become his trademark quirky style. The film has a look reminiscent of German expressionist movies of the 1920s, filtered through a pop-art sensibility of cartoons, horror serials and Gothic fairy tales. The result is a surreal, mystical world, yet one very close to our own â€" that perfectly fits the absurdist humor. And the score by Danny Elfman is terrific. In all, Pee wee’s Big Adventure is a delightful film, enjoyable for children as well as adults.

Saturday June 5th at 8:15pm â€" The Blues Brothers (1980)

Starring John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd, James Brown, Ray Charles, Cab Calloway, Aretha Franklin, Carrie Fisher, John Candy, Henry Gibson. Directed by John Landis.
(133mins., Rated: R.)

This movie is also an unapologetic homage to rhythm-and-blues in all its popular derivatives, from Cab Calloway to James Brown to Aretha Franklin, all of whom appear in lovingly realized musical scenes. And there is great fun in spotting the other members of the film’s legion of guest stars, including John Candy, Carrie Fisher, Steve Lawrence, Twiggy, Paul Reubens (aka Pee-Wee Herman), Frank Oz and Steven Spielberg. And topping it all off, the streets, highways and police department of Chicago are laid to waste in what is, if not the most spectacular, then without doubt the funniest and coolest car chase scenes ever filmed. The Blues Brothers is filled with great fun and great music from beginning to end, and is the essence of entertainment.

Visit The Landmark Loews Jersey web site for details.

[size=1]The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre[/size]

Rory
Rory on May 16, 2010 at 5:31 pm

How is it that you imbed photos in these posts? I’d like to try it myself.

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on May 16, 2010 at 4:13 pm

[size=3][color=red]The Landmark Loews Jersey â€" The Wonder Theatre Of New Jersey[/color][/size]

This coming weekend of May 21st and 22nd, The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre located on Journal Square in Jersey City, New Jersey, continues its 80th Birthday Jubilee and 10th consecutive year of classic films. This season, we are saluting the decades that the Landmark Loews Jersey has been entertaining us. This month, we will be presenting some great classic films from the 1970’s.

Located directly across from the PATH subway station connecting Manhattan with Jersey City, it is also easy to reach from most area highways. Secure discounted parking is located directly behind the theatre. Have your parking ticket validated at the theatre’s boxoffice.

All Show Are Presented In 35mm With Genuine Carbon Arc Projection On Our Giant 50 Foot Wide Screen.

Friday May 21st at 8:00pm â€" Taxi Driver (1976)

Starring Robert De Niro, Cybill Shepherd, Jodie Foster, Peter Boyle, Albert Brooks, Harvey Keitel.
Directed by Martin Scorsese. (113mins, Rated R)

“I’m God’s lonely man,” says Travis Bickle, played by Robert De Niro in one of his finest and most memorable performances. He’s an insomniac, ex-Marine and chronic loner who, even when he tries, can’t seem to relate to the world around him. He drives a cab at night in the decaying New York City of the mid-1970s, which director Martin Scorsese and screenwriter Paul Schrader depict as a grimly stylized hell on Earth, where noise, filth, directionless rage, and dirty sex (both morally and literally) surround him at all turns. Lost in this toxic milieu, chronically isolated and potentially volatile, Bickle is a bomb waiting to explode, like the proverbial gun which, when produced in the first act, must go off in the third. After an encounter with a malevolent fare (played by Scorsese), the increasingly paranoid Bickle begins to condition (and arm) himself for his imagined destiny, a mission that mutates from assassinating a Presidential candidate to violently “saving” a teenage hooker (played by Jodie Foster) from her pimp. The film features Bernard Herrmann’s final score, reported to be finished the day he died.

Saturday May 22nd at 6:15pm â€" Blazing Saddles (1974)

Starring Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder, Madeline Kahn, Slim Pickens, Harvey Korman, Mel Brooks.
Written & Directed by Mel Brooks. (93mins, Rated R)

Blazing Saddles is vulgar, crude and sometimes scandalous â€" and is one of the funniest and most successful film spoofs of all time. It is also writer-director Mel Brooks at his ribald best, with further outrageous hilarity added by co-writer Richard Pryor. Cleavon Little plays the first African-American sheriff of a stunned Western town scheduled for demolition by an encroaching railroad. If that plot sounds, at least in part, like a throw-back to the movies of an earlier time, it’s because Brooks was, in his own manic way, a central figure in revising classic film genres to reflect the 70s' values and attitudes â€" an effort more often associated with such directors as Robert Altman and Peter Bogdanovich. Blazing Saddles is a work that truly could have only been made in the ‘70s â€" the idiom of the classic American western hijacked into an over-the-top comedy that purposely and relentlessly shredded the popular conception of “good taste” while making merciless fun of everyone, regardless of skin color or religious persuasion. If blacks came off as stereotypical, whites were shown as just plain stupid and ignorant. The result was one of the funniest films of all time â€" which, ironically, could probably not be made today in our more politically correct time. Beyond its over-the-top humor, Blazing Saddles boasts some great performances: Little and Gene Wilder have great chemistry; Madeline Kahn is wonderful as a chanteuse modeled on Marlene Dietrich; and Slim Pickens, Harvey Korman and even Brooks himself turn in great supporting roles.

Saturday May 22nd at 8:40pm â€" Saturday Night Fever (1977)

Starring John Travolta, Karen Gorney, Barry Miller, Joseph Cali, Paul Pope.
Directed by John Badham. (119mins, Rated R)

From the moment John Travolta sauntered down a Brooklyn street to the Bee Gees' “Stayin' Alive” at the beginning of Saturday Night Fever, music, movies and all of pop culture were irrevocably changed, and the 1970s gained what is perhaps the decade’s single most recognizable celluloid imagery. Travolta plays Tony Manero, a Brooklyn paint-store clerk who’s trapped in a dead-end existence â€" except at night on the disco dance floor, where, when he struts his stuff amid the flashing lights and sweaty, undulating bodies, he’s a king. Part of the film’s success owes to how astutely it balanced a gritty sense of the 70s' economic and social malaise with galvanizing dance numbers. But of course, the hallmark of the film is Travolata’s star-making performance â€" especially the scenes in his iconic white suit â€" and the Bee Gees soundtrack. During the first half of 1978, the movie’s disco songs saturated the singles charts, occupying up to four positions at a time, prompting more and more people to see the movie â€" just as, in turn, the movie’s vast popularity prompted more and more record sales. This powerful marketing synergy between movies and music set a new standard, with the film eventually grossing over $100 million and the soundtrack becoming one of the best-selling albums of all time. For many young people at the time, the movie marked their generation’s coming of age and was an indelible movie-going experience. By any measure, Saturday Night Fever is the definitive evocation of the Disco Era, and affirmation of Disco’s dominance of the pop culture scene at the time.

Visit The Landmark Loews Jersey web site for details.

[size=1]The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre[/size]

RobMinichino
RobMinichino on May 14, 2010 at 6:10 am

There will be two more film weekends this season. The weekend of May 21-22, we will be showing three films from the 70s, and on June 4-5, we will be showing three films from the 80s.

Friday, May 21, 8:00PM: Taxi Driver
Saturday, May 22, 6:15PM: Blazing Saddles
Saturday, May 22, 8:40PM: Saturday Night Fever

Friday, June 4, 8:00PM: Raging Bull
Saturday, June 5, 6:00PM: Pee-wee’s Big Adventure
Saturday, June 5, 8:15PM: Blues Brothers

roxy1927
roxy1927 on May 13, 2010 at 2:54 am

no more films this season?

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on April 26, 2010 at 5:19 pm

Very nice photos Brad&jwballer!

Brad Smith
Brad Smith on April 24, 2010 at 11:53 am

Click here for a photograph of the Loew’s Jersey Theatre taken in 1930 by George Mann of the comedy dance team, Barto & Mann.

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on April 22, 2010 at 9:00 am

> I don’t think they’re actually imbedded, more like a visual link.

Exactly, they are visual links. None of the photos are embedded. None of the photos are loaded to cinematreasures servers. Chuck1231 is not a moderator here and he is not privy to any communications I have had with them. His concern posted above is not a valid concern, the photos have no effect on the cinematreasures servers.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on April 22, 2010 at 4:58 am

I don’t think they’re actually imbedded, more like a visual link. MBD, care to elaborate?