Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 1 - 25 of 11,843 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Majestic Theatre on Apr 25, 2018 at 4:58 pm

The 1914-1915 edition of The American Motion Picture Directory lists the Auditorium in Boise, but without an address. Interestingly, it lists the Isis Theatre at 111 10th Street, so unless it was on North 10th it must have been the Majestic’s next door neighbor.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lyric Theatre on Apr 25, 2018 at 4:21 pm

I’ve come across an item in the May 27, 1916, issue of The Moving Picture World which might or might not have to do with the Lyric Theatre, but does have something to do with its owner, Herman Kaiser. It says “Jack Mitchell has opened the old Kaiser theater at Boise and renamed it the Liberty.”

The Kaiser Theater was listed in the 1914 Gus Hill directory as a movie house with 408 seats, managed by Herman Kaiser. The 1914-1915 American Motion Picture Directory lists both the Lyric Theatre, Main Street, and the Kaiser Theatre, 7th and Main Streets, but the address we give for the Lyric, 625 W. Main, is in fact a building at the corner of 7th and Main, now occupied by Goldy’s Corner, a bakery and coffee shop.

I’m thinking that Mr. Kaiser might have renamed the Lyric after himself around this time, and the 1914 AMPD could have double listed the house under both its old an new names. Of course it’s also possible that Mr. Kaiser opened a second theater on one of the other three corners of the intersection.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Magic Lantern Theatre on Apr 24, 2018 at 5:56 pm

The Chadwick Theatre opened on January 26, 1925. The house was one of several new theaters featured in a portfolio in the March 28 issue of Exhibitors Trade Review (scan at Internet Archive.)

Though the article failed to name the architect, it did say that the interiors were inspired by 16th century English architecture. With their beamed ceilings the auditorium and foyer did resemble the Tudor style more than anything else, though the screens for the $25,000 Wurlitzer Hope-Jones unit orchestra were sufficiently elaborate that they might have been more of a nod to the later Jacobean style.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Vista Theatre on Apr 24, 2018 at 4:25 pm

Given the opening date and the March, 1925 appearance of the announcement of the project, cited in my previous comment, I think we can safely assume that Victor J. DeFoe was indeed the architect of the El Rey.

As the item in The Reel Journal mentions only De Foe, I don’t know if Walter A. Besecke was involved in this project or not. The firm of DeFoe & Besecke was formed in 1925, and a biographical sketch of DeFoe says that the pair designed several theaters from 1925 to 1928, the years the partnership lasted, so it does seem likely. The El Rey did bear a strong resemblance to the firm’s Madrid Theatre, opened in 1926.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theater on Apr 23, 2018 at 5:02 pm

In 1967, Commonwealth Theatres' reopened the State Theatre on July 19 following an extensive remodeling project that had taken three months to complete. The house sported new seating, carpeting and decor, as well as remodeled lobby, concession stand, and lounges, and a new front and marquee. Paramount’s feature “El Dorado” was the opening attraction.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Campus Theatre on Apr 23, 2018 at 5:01 pm

Construction would soon begin on Commonwealth Theatres' new house at Warrensburg, Missouri, according to the August 7, 1967, issue of Boxoffice. The project was designed by the Kansas City firm Milton Costlow & Associates, and would feature decoration by Chicago’s Hans Teichert studios.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Cinema 5 on Apr 23, 2018 at 4:18 pm

The October 10, 1967 opening means Associated Theatres missed thier target date. The August 7 issue of Boxoffice had reported that the twin was expected to open in early September.

I’m wondering if the giant box of popcorn displayed on the Calder Way side of the building is an artifact left over from the theater operation. The theater closed over ten years ago and the building was converted for retail use, and though it is currently occupied mostly by restaurants I doubt any of them serve boxes of popcorn.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Plaza Theater on Apr 23, 2018 at 3:08 pm

Associated Theatres' 650-seat Plaza Theatre in Butler was expected to open in early September, according to a brief article in the August 7, 1967, issue of Boxoffice.

The Plaza was one of four projects the chain had underway. In Pittsburgh, Associated was about to embark on a remodeling of its downtown Gateway Theatre, and the 550-seat Fiesta Theatre, on 6th Street downtown, was set to open on August 22. A new twin theater, as yet unnamed, was also to open in early September at State College, Pennsylvania.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Apollo Theater on Apr 22, 2018 at 9:01 pm

CinemaTour lists the Apollo at 229 W. Sixth Street, which is now the site of B&B’s Majestic Theatre. The Apollo’s building was demolished in 2005 to make way for the new theater.

What I have not yet been able to discover is whether the Apollo was one of Concorida’s other old theaters reopened and renamed. It could have been the Strand, for which I’ve been unable to find an address. The Strand was in operation prior to 1948, and suffered a major fire in the spring of that year and had to be rebuilt. It was still in operation at least as late as 1951. The Apollo was open at least as early as 1979.

Concordia also had a house called the White Way Theatre, opened in 1914 and operating into the 1950s, but it was on Washington Street. There was also an early house called the Lyric, but I haven’t been able to find much about it. I’ve found even less about a theaater opened in 1916 as the Iris, and possibly later renamed the Isis, though that might have been a typo. There was also an early house called the Photo Play, gone by the mid-1920s.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Kimo Theatre on Apr 22, 2018 at 8:38 pm

David and Noelle’s list of known Boller theaters has the Alamo listed only as a 1944 remodeling project. It doesn’t list Boller Brothers as the original architects in 1910.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Summit Theatre on Apr 22, 2018 at 6:57 pm

The restaurant occupies only the ground floor of the former theater building, and perhaps not all of that. According to a listing at Trulia, the remainder of the building has been converted into 8 residential apartments. The Summit Theatre was built in 1913, and was listed in the 1914-1915 edition of The American Moving Picture Directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Gem Theatre on Apr 22, 2018 at 6:44 pm

This house was still listed as the Star Theatre in the 1914-1915 edition of The American Motion Picture Directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Teatro Tampico on Apr 22, 2018 at 6:30 pm

If the Spillane Theatre was indeed newly built around 1918, then it had a predecessor that was called the Roanoke Theatre earlier. The Roanoke Theatre was listed at 39th and Summit streets inthe 1914-1915 edition of The American Motion Picture Directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Palace Theatre on Apr 22, 2018 at 6:14 pm

The Palace Theatre was listed at 932 Main Street in the 1914-1915 edition of The American Motion Picture Directory, but the house opened no later than 1909, as it was listed in that year’s city directory. The Palace was on the ground floor of the St. George Hotel, built in 1895.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Murray Theatre on Apr 22, 2018 at 5:51 pm

A Murray Theatre was operating in this neighborhood at least as early as 1915, when it was listed in The American Motion Picture Direcotry, though at 3202 E. 27th. Newspaper ads from 1915 give the location as 27th and Walrond Avenue. The Murray was at 3206 27th by the time the 1919 city directory was printed.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lyric Theatre on Apr 22, 2018 at 5:32 pm

The Lyric Theatre is listed at 622 Main Street in the 1914-1915 edition of The American Motion Picture Directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Bonaventure Theatre on Apr 22, 2018 at 5:08 pm

2317 Independence Avenue is on the south side of Independence opposite the end of Olive Street. There is a modern building there now which uses that number for a nondescript storefront in between the LB7 Insurance Agency and the Holy Land Halal Market.

In 1886 a hostelry called the Bonaventure Hotel was built at 2307 Independence Avenue, and I suspect that the theater was either part of the hotel project or a later addition to it. It might be that the theater’s building can be partly seen at far left in this undated photo of the hotel.

The photo looks to have been taken in the 1930s, judging from the streamlined style of one of the cars parked along the street. The theater might have been closed by the time this photo was made, but the building looks like it has an open lobby-style entrance flanked by a storefront that could have a matching storefront on the unseen far side. I can’t make out any sort of marquee, though.

The Bonaventure Theatre was listed in the 1914-1915 edition of The American Motion Picture Directory, and in the 1912 Kansas City city directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Ashland Theatre on Apr 22, 2018 at 2:37 pm

The Ashland Theatre is listed at 24th and Elmwood in the 1914-1915 American Moving Picture Directory. David & Noelle’s list of known Boller theaters has it listed as a 1946 remodeling project.

The October 27, 1915, issue of Western Contractor had a notice about a planned remodeling of a theater at 2400 Elmwood, but didn’t name the architect or give the name of the theater itself.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about New Center Theatre on Apr 22, 2018 at 1:56 pm

The New Centre Theatre is on David and Noelle’s list of known Boller theaters as a 1916 project.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lyric Theatre on Apr 22, 2018 at 1:50 pm

This article from 2015 says that the Lyric Theatre was upstairs, above what is now the Palace Restaurant and Bar. The Internest gives the address of the Palace as 735 S. Main Street. The building, at the northeast corner of Main and 8th Streets, is still standing. The Lyric’s last movie was shown in 1959. An upstairs theater stil operating in 1959 was quite a rarity.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Victory Theater on Apr 21, 2018 at 10:43 pm

davidcoppock: It looks like the trolley car was running on Line 28, the Stony Island route. From October 15, 1916, through June 29, 1951, it operated along 47th Street between Lake Park Avenue and Cottage Grove Avenue. The route ran from downtown to Stony Island Avenue and 94th Street.

Line 47 also ran on 47th Street. It provided local electric streetcar service along 47th between Lake Park Avenue and State Street from 1895, and was extended west to Kedzie Avenue in 1896. The route was converted to buses in 1951.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theatre on Apr 15, 2018 at 7:18 pm

The State Theatre opened in a new building at the corner of Jefferson and Illinois Streets in 1912 as the Princess Theatre. The 1914-1915 edition of The American Motion Picture Directory lists it as the Palace Theatre. The builder and original operator, E. J. Degenhardt, had been one of the town’s barbers. He sold the business in 1924, but retained ownership of the building.

In 1926 the house was still listed in the FDY as the Palace Theatre, but by 1927 it had become the Strand Theatre. It was taken over and renamed the State by Alger Theatres by 1932, although last listed in the laggard FDY as the Strand in 1933. The July 2, 1932, issue of Motion Picture Herald said:

“ E. E. Alger of the State at Mendota, Ill., dug deep into his pockets to put that house in tip-top order with everything from projectors to ventilating equipment and seats.”
From 1926 through 1941 the house was listed with 450 seats. In the 1942 Yearbook it is listed with 700 seats, indicating that an expansion that had probably been completed before the end of 1941.

Konrad Schiecke’s book Historic Movie Theatres in Illinois says that the State Theatre closed in the 1980s.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Kee Theatre on Apr 15, 2018 at 4:33 pm

It was actually 1942 when the Kee was lost to a fire that destroyed a big chunk of Kewanee’s business district. This is the item that was published in the April 15 issue of Motion Picture Daily:

“Two Houses Burned

“Kewanee, Ill., April 14. — The Rialto and Kee theatres were among the 70 buildings which were razed or damaged when fire swept through the heart of this city’s business district yesterday.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rialto Theatre on Apr 15, 2018 at 4:17 pm

In 1933 the Rialto was a Balaban & Katz house, noted in the October 6 issue of The Film Daily.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Peerless Theatre on Apr 15, 2018 at 2:52 pm

The March 9, 1921, issue of The American Contractor said that the general contract had been let for the Peerless Theatre in Kewanee. The 68x150 foot building was to cost $150,000, and had been designed by Chicago architect Ralph C. Harris.