Comments from MarkDHite

Showing 1 - 25 of 74 comments

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Kings Theatre on Jul 21, 2015 at 8:39 am

How are trucks hitting the marquee? Does it extend past the sidewalk?

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Ohio Theatre on May 5, 2015 at 8:22 am

Interesting interview with Anne Dornin who designed the interior decor for the Ohio and many other theaters as an associate of Thomas Lamb. It’s from the Brooklyn Daily Eagle in 1931.

http://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/59888680/

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Kings Theatre on May 5, 2015 at 8:16 am

Here’s a link to interesting interview with Dornin in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle in 1931. There are nice photos of her face and in Loew’s Ohio in Columbus OH. Very interesting to learn that her professional association was not so much with Loew’s as with Thomas Lamb, gradually taking greater responsibility over the years for the decor and construction of the theaters he designed.

http://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/59888680/

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Kings Theatre on May 4, 2015 at 7:46 am

Thanks Matt. I’ve never seen it spelled any other way but you are absolutely correct. Anne Dornin. Her married name was Anne D. Scudamore. Her obit can be found in the NYT on Sept 18, 1960. That explains a lot. Thanks again.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Ohio Theatre, Columbus, OH in 1928 - View of the Balcony loge on May 2, 2015 at 8:58 pm

Never seen these before. These are not the standard shots from Loew’s. Looks like something from a trade magazine regarding the plaster work.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Ohio Theatre on May 2, 2015 at 8:53 pm

This is a photo of people lined up to see Roger Garrett in his Farewell to the Ohio Concert in Feb. 1969. Fortunately the farewell was premature and he returned to play the Ohio’s Mighty Morton several more times.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Ohio Theatre on May 2, 2015 at 8:46 pm

Maybe the Broad?

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Ohio Theatre on May 2, 2015 at 8:46 pm

Also not from the Ohio.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Ohio Theatre on May 2, 2015 at 8:45 pm

These seats were not from the Ohio. Maybe the Palace? It had seats with a scroll aisle standard like that.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Brooklyn Paramount Theatre on May 2, 2015 at 8:32 pm

The theatre has already had a “major alteration” with all of the mezzanine and the front of the balcony removed. Even with a lot of beautiful restoration, the theatre will never be as it was in 1928. But I think it’s spectacular that it’s coming back! And can easily imagine it with 1500 seats. Bravo to Brooklyn! Again!

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Kings Theatre on May 2, 2015 at 7:18 pm

And, for what it’s worth, Ann Dornan ( with an a ) was the name of the decorator who worked for Loew’s in the late 1920s.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Kings Theatre on May 2, 2015 at 7:14 pm

For an old theatre, or any historic place, to survive decades of neglect and to be revived in splendor, two basic things need to have happened. One, there need to have been selfless volunteers to spend hundreds and thousands of hours to keep the building alive for years and years when no one else cared. This first group is almost solely motivated by love for the place and the community. Two, there need to be powerful politicians, fundraisers and entrepreneurs to get the huge amounts of $$$$ and combine those with the right expertise to make a restoration happen. Naturally enough, the second group get all of the headlines and awards. But without the first group no restoration would or could ever have happened. They tend to be forgotten, but deserve the accolades just as much as the politicians for making it all happen.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Capitol Theatre on Feb 13, 2015 at 3:07 pm

Location, location, location. Broadway and 7th Avenue real estate is just too valuable to expect much in historic preservation there. The Loews Wonder Theatres have all survived in part because of their less lucrative locations. The Palace survives because it’s a Bway theatre and protected as such. And makes money.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Roxy Theatre on Nov 2, 2014 at 2:25 pm

Simon, thanks for clarifying this point once again. It’s interesting to remember that during the original five year run under Roxy himself it was the theatre itself that was the main attraction with its huge orchestra, organ, and stage spectaculars including the ballet corps, the male choir, and the Roxyettes. For those who don’t already know, these shows were created by the same people who later made the Radio City Music Hall famous for its stage spectacles: producer Leon Leonidoff and choreographer Russell Markert. The movie was just one piece of the whole amazing show.

After the exit of Roxy and all of his staff and performers to the Music Hall the Roxy Theatre really struggled for a few years, as Simon tells us. It’s parent company Fox Pictures was in receivership and didn’t have enough top product to fill the Roxy’s screen. After the advent of the 20th Century-Fox merger and better corporate support of the Roxy Theatre through Fox’s theatre arm, the Roxy flourished again, especially during WWII as all theatrs did. It remained a leading World premiere film showcase until its demise in 1960. Remember that 20th-Fox’s CinemaScope process had its world premiere at the Roxy with the film “The Robe”.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Roxy Theatre on Nov 2, 2014 at 1:47 pm

The Roxy remained a major first run house until the very final weeks of its existence. MGM’s “The Gazebo” with Glenn Ford had its New York debut run at the Roxy, opening January 15, 1960 along with a Roxy stage show. This ran until February 26. Then the Roxy’s last two engagements, filling out the weeks until it closed, were a rerelease double bill of “On the Waterfront” and “The Caine Mutiny”; and then, opening on March 9, “The Wind Cannot Read”. There was no stage show during these last two bills. “The Wind Cannot Read” was a British import starring Dirk Bogart. Not a major release in the US, but by no means a B-picture.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Roxy Theatre on Nov 2, 2014 at 11:58 am

Well here’s another photo that show women ushers at the Roxy as late as 1947.

Dated 1947, it has this caption: “Roxy usherettes (l to r) Marie Prange, Sheilah Knox, and Jo Ann De Santis dispense coffee and doughnuts to line of movie patrons headed by Mrs. Lily Vieder, at the premiere of "Forever Amber” outside the Roxy Theater, New York City Date Created/Published: 1947.

Here’s the link. Only a tiny thumbnail is available. Pic is under copyright.

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/98519346/

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Roxy Theatre on Nov 2, 2014 at 11:48 am

The year of this news release is 1944. Thanks, this is very interesting. I like how the Roxy takes credit for inventing the idea of women ushers, while I would guess they were already employed in theatres around the U.S.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about NYC ROXY Theatre usherette on Nov 2, 2014 at 11:45 am

I’m guessing this photo and the news release next to it are related? If so, this is from November 1944.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about NYC ROXY Theater - 1953 stage show on Nov 2, 2014 at 11:43 am

This is amazing! Was the original a slide?

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Roxy Theatre on Nov 2, 2014 at 11:20 am

Here is a link to the photo I mentioned. It is from the Library of Congress, dated 1945 with the caption “Head usherette Capt. Rosemary Smith inspects line of uniformed usherettes who are holding gloved hands up to be examined, Roxy Theater, New York City.”

Here is a link to the page, the photo may be opened in three different formats and resolutions.

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/98516008/

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Roxy Theatre on Nov 2, 2014 at 2:16 am

Women were probably employed in concessions, box office, and as secretaries and receptionists. Earlier, there would have been a “matron” in the ladies lounge and a nurse in the theatre’s medical rooms. And of course, as cleaners. It’s an excellent question. Perhaps someone with direct knowledge can recall what jobs were open to women, other than as performers, at the Roxy in the 1950s and earlier.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Roxy Theatre on Oct 31, 2014 at 7:06 pm

Simon is saying that after WWII the Roxy went back to an all male usher staff. That sounds right, even though I wasn’t there, I’ve never seen a picture of a female usher at the Roxy except during wartime. I have a photo that I downloaded, I don’t know where from, that shows an older woman and her staff of wartime usherettes at the Roxy. The uniform is a very basic uniform dress with one row of buttons all the way down the front. If it’s not already in the photo section here, I will try to add it the next time I’m at my computer. Cheers

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Roxy Theatre on Sep 20, 2014 at 2:06 pm

What you say is true. The Roxy must have had huge operating expenses, and while I don’t think it ever lost money it must have been clear by 1960 that it’s days as a big moneymaker were quickly dwindling. However, I think the Roxy was doomed more by the value of its Midtown Manhattan real estate. From the time it was acquired by Rockefeller Center in the early 50s I imagine the plan was to just keep it going until the most advantageous deal could be made to capitalize on its location as Rock Ctr developed the west side of Sixth Ave. First the air rights were used for other development and then the lot was finally used for a new office building. Rock Ctr already had Radio City Music Hall and had no interest in keeping two huge movie palaces going. It probably never had a chance to survive after about 1952.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Hunt's Cinestage Theatre on May 24, 2014 at 9:17 am

2001 played at the Grand. But maybe it had a later run at Hunt’s? Although I don’t remember the Cinestage as running anything except as first-run.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite commented about Radio City Music Hall on May 24, 2014 at 9:10 am

Just curious, does anyone know if the Music Hall was installed with movie projectors from the start? Or did they have to be added, and the booth windows rebuilt, after the variety format flopped? Thanks!