Comments from Nataloff

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Nataloff
Nataloff commented about Paris Cinema on Oct 31, 2012 at 11:37 pm

The Paris was not a Sack theatre when it enjoyed its heyday in the late 60s and early 70s. It was four-walled by Joseph E. Levine of Embassy Pictures, which became Avco-Embassy during the lease, to show “The Graduate,” “The Producers” and “The Lion in Winter” because Levine was still having a blood feud with Ben Sack over Sack’s 1965 exhibition of Levine’s release, “Darling,” and no way was Joe gonna let Ben make any money off him. The feud was finally settled when Sack booked “The Night Porter” from Joe in 1974. I know this because I handled the PR for them, God forgive me.

Nataloff
Nataloff commented about Off The Wall Cinema on Sep 19, 2012 at 1:16 am

Hi Michael (and others) late of Off-the-Wall. I spent many happy hours there reviewing your programs, plus I got to meet June Foray, Bill Scott, Richie Havens and a few others whose films ran at OTW. Later worked with Larry Silverman at WSBK and Dana Hersey who is still, 25 years later, the best and most professional guy I ever shared a screen with. Nat Segaloff

Nataloff
Nataloff commented about Allen Theater on Aug 15, 2012 at 8:39 pm

I had three local theatres growing up in Northwest Park: the Langley, the Flower, and the Allen. The Langley was on the mainstream firstrun track, the Flower was what passed for an art house, but the Allen was fearless in running exploitation movies. I spent many a happy Saturday matinee in the Allen sticking to the floor while watching Roger Corman movies, Japanese import horror films, and independent monster releases. But the first movie I saw there was the last reissue of “The Wizard of Oz” before MGM sold it to CBS. It scared the bejesus out of me, and what made it worse was that, on the way out, I turned around and saw the mural with those two humongous masks of comedy and drama glaring down at me above the lobby. I was so rattled that I begged my parents to take me to Topps Drive-In across New Hampshire Avenue for a double-decker burger and a milk shake “so think you have to take lessons to drink it.”

Nataloff
Nataloff commented about Beacon Hill Theatre on Aug 15, 2012 at 8:28 pm

We used to call the second version of this theatre “the bunker.” You had to walk down a humongous flight of stairs to get there after buying your ticket at street level, and then walk up them afterward when the show was over. (So much for the Americans with Disabilities Act.) The rumbling that occurred every so often was the Green Line MBTA passing nearby underground. And everyone is right about the reissue of “This is Cinerama” that played there. It was wrong in every possible way.

Nataloff
Nataloff commented about Mugar Omni Theater at the Museum of Science on Aug 15, 2012 at 8:21 pm

I haven’t been there in decades, but when it first opened I was appalled that they were showing movies that had been shot in IMAX in the incorrect Omni-Max format. The result stretched a flat image across an oval screen, horribly distorting and dimming the image. I don’t know if they’ve found a way around this, but it got to the point where I simply stopped reviewing them so I wouldn’t sound like a broken record every time they opened a new attraction the wrong way.

Nataloff
Nataloff commented about Gary Theatre on Aug 15, 2012 at 8:15 pm

The Gary (named after Ben Sack’s son) and Saxon (also supposedly named after “Sack’s son”) were linked by an underground passageway.

Nataloff
Nataloff commented about Exeter Street Theatre on Aug 13, 2012 at 11:57 pm

A very eccentric woman named A. Viola Berlin ran the Exeter Street Theatre. She seemed to be the only person in the world who could get along with Donald Rugoff, the mercurial owner of Cinema 5 who supplied the Exeter with its remarkable string of hits from about 1967 to the early 70s. I seem to recall as well that Ms. Berlin used the theatre on Sunday mornings for some sort of religious services, thereby receiving some kind of tax advantage. Above all, I remember that the Exeter was the one Boston theatre where you went to the theatre rather than the movie playing there because you knew the movie playing there would usually be good.

Nataloff
Nataloff commented about Loews Cheri on Aug 13, 2012 at 11:46 pm

Tom Kauycheck was the long-time manager of the Cheri after Joe Sasso was promoted. Tom’s assistant was Hugo Ugolini. Tommy was terrific and he tended to hire from Boston’s Asian community because (he told me) of their strong family relationships and therefore dependability. But he also hired a lot of Irish kids. The Cheri was the Sack (well before Loews and USA Cinema) flagship house and was touted as among the first mult-screen cinema in the United States. Cheri I and II were okay but Cheri III was a disaster with the projector mounted in the ceiling aiming down (thanks to the space available within the parking garage). By the way, my name is Nat Segaloff and I was the chain’s publicity director in 1973 and 1974, then became a critic.

Nataloff
Nataloff commented about Boston Opera House on Aug 13, 2012 at 11:20 pm

Apparently this is the site that pops up when you can’t sleep. I’m Nat Segaloff and I was publicity director of Sack Theatres from January 0f 1973 through November of 1974. I remember a lot of great people who worked at the Savoy including Lee (nee Laurie) Arnone, George Andriotti, Fran DeVasto, Steve Amy, Keith Langan, Cedric Henderson, Barbara, John Goyack, and I’m trying to connect faces with the names on this thread, so please help. Of course, the last entry was in April of 2012 and before that in 2011, so there’s more of a chance of the bust of B. F. Keith singing “Volari” than of my hearing back from or about anybody. BTW, I moved to LA in 1993 and have been writing books and producing TV shows off and on since then. And I miss Boston every day.