Comments from Simon L. Saltzman

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Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Jan 2, 2014 at 10:19 am

More pertinent info re above: British Gaumont helped to keep the Roxy going during the difficult years (1932 – 1937)by giving the Roxy exclusive first run rights to its releases, including “The 39 Steps.” …thus offering a buffer to the decision by the Hollywood studios to not let the Roxy have its A product because of its low admissions scale. The Roxy survived this, inlcuding the departure of Roxy himself (to run the RCMH and RKO Roxy (later to become the Center Theater), and more including Cinemascope without stage shows, Two-a-day with “Windjammer” and other policy changes that occurred during the managament of Roxy’s nephew Robert C. Rothafel who took charge during the 1950s.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Jan 1, 2014 at 6:08 pm

There are many answers to Bigjoe’s question. The Roxy played only A films from the time it opened in 1927 until the Depression years between 1931 and 1937 (assuming that means films produced to be the top of a double feature in subsequent release). Between 1933 and 1937 the Roxy severely lowered its admission prices and economized on the stage shows. During that time, the major studios balked at having their major films play there. It was only after/when Twentieth Century Fox contracted with the Roxy to supply it with their major films did the 6,000 seat theater regain its status. Between 1937 and its closing, the Roxy was consistently an outlet for A films. Your rating of films is presumably based on the intention of the studio and not the quality of the film. This does not take into account the many modestly produced “sleepers” that needed critical approval to succeed and a Roxy premiere was a help.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Aug 9, 2012 at 6:33 pm

BigJoe, My guess would be “The King and I” (9 weeks), “Bus Stop” (6 weeks), “Giant” (9 weeks) “Anastasia” (8 weeks) all in 1956. There were many A films after that but these had the longest runs and made the most money and were critically acclaimed. Next case.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Jul 12, 2012 at 3:03 pm

That’s an easy one as anyone who knows and loves the Roxy will know. Stage shows were dropped when the house converted to Cinemascope. “The Robe” opened in mid September 1953 and played 13 weeks. It was only exclusive, however, in the Metropolitan area as it also opening gradually throughout the country in select theaters. It was following by “Beneath the Twelve Mile Reef” as the Christmas attraction. “The Robe” grossed $264,000 in its first week, the largest gross for one theater in one week anywhere in the world (seven shows a day)beginning at 9 AM. with a midnight show. Prices were Weekday $1.00;1.50; 2.00 weekdays; 1.50; 2.00 and 2.50 weekends. At the time the top price at other mainstem houses were $1.80 with a top of $1.50 at RCMH.(Previous record holder was “Forever Amber” which grossed $163,00 opening week and had a five-week run in 1947)

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Jul 2, 2012 at 2:58 pm

Bigjoe59, You’re question opens a can of worms as to what constitutes an A Level film. Among (of course debatable)the A level films that played the Roxy during its last year included “That Kind of Woman” (Loren and Hunter)“Lil Abner”, “This Earth is Mine” (Rock Hudson),“The Big Circus” (Victor Mature) and the last film “The Wind Cannot Read” with Dirk Bogarde….and to be factual as well as fair, the Roxy, except during the Depression Era, never played a B level film.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Jul 2, 2012 at 9:46 am

Adding to the great photo sent by Tinseltoes: “Ten Gentlemen from West Point” was a great hit for the Roxy beginning the post war boom of movie going along the stem. It ran an unprecedented four weeks in June beginning with an opening week gross of $55,000. The stage show featured the Stuart Morgan Dancers, ballet soloist Carol King, impressionist Cookie Bowers and the Gae Foster Roxyettes all of whom participated in a spectacular salute to the United Nations in which the entire company descended a huge stairway waving the flags of all nations. This, in the light of stiff competition from the Music Hall where “Mrs. Miniver” also opened ($100,000 opening)and was destined to run a record-breaking 11 weeks. That same week, “In This Our Life” broke the house record at the Strand. What a week! Wish I was there.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Mar 12, 2012 at 11:26 am

AlAlvarez, I beg to differ. The war and post-war years 1941 to 1950 were very successful years for the Roxy, with the grosses and attendance often on a par, sometimes surpassing, the Music Hall. A major factor in the disparity of grosses is that the Roxy maintained a children’s price, ranging over those years from.25 to .50 while there was only one price for all at the Hall. When it comes to business, the Paramount out-did all the main-stem houses and it had half the seating capacity. The Roxy had a great run with big name performers and a resident company for more than a decade.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Mar 2, 2012 at 12:59 pm

Myron, The Lincoln Center Library for the Performing Arts would be a great repository for the Roxy Programs…as I would (love to have them)…or at least borrow them and then bring them personally to the library.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Feb 29, 2012 at 6:48 am

Hey Housechecker, Yes, indeed, before the Roxyettes (later known as “Blades and Belles”)skated on ice they could be seen not only on roller skates, but balancing and doing formations atop huge balls (an audience favorite). Yes, indeed, Merman sold tickets as a publicity stunt (fact checked from Variety)just for the opening hour.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Feb 28, 2012 at 1:26 pm

Hey Tinseltoes, Good job but you might have mentioned that “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” was a major hit and ran an unprecedented six weeks (opening week $105,000)grossing $500,000 during that time. The 24 Roxyettes also did their famous roller skating routine which featured “the whip” requiring the last skater to catch up to the end of the ever spinning line. Next show was “A Royal Scandal” with Tallulah you know who…and a major bomb.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Feb 27, 2012 at 10:21 am

Just for a chuckle. A publicity stunt: Ethel Merman sold tickets in the box office on opening morning.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Feb 27, 2012 at 6:54 am

Myron, One of the many informed contributors to this site (wish I could remember who)regularly sent a year by year list of Roxy films and the accompanying stage show. But you have to go back through the archives for this. Also fun is going to the Lincoln Center Library and read all the Variety magazine issues on microfilm from 1927 to the Roxy’s demise. Another source on line is Billboard Magazine and search year by year. The info is out there…just search and ask.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Feb 16, 2012 at 12:01 pm

Sorry ERD, but Oklahoma premiered at the Rivoli in Todd AO on reserved seats. Also interesting is that Carousel was never actually shown (although it was advertised) in the CinemaScope 55 process (more info on the Wide Screen Museum)

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Oct 27, 2011 at 3:02 pm

Dear Housechecker, If you were at the Roxy the summer of ‘56 then you may have been there for “The King and I” which is when I began and stayed for one year. If this is true then perhaps we may have met or at least stood together for inspection. More importantly, one of the contributors to this site is gathering information about the theater for a book on its operations. Are you a New York or vicinity resident? A reunion of “those still standing” would be wonderful but no one except you has yet responded. By the way, “The King and I” was the beginning of the Roxy’s short but great golden year of hits with crowds like the one in the lobby shown in the photo above for “But Stop,” “Giant,” and “Anastasia.” Does anyone know the date of the photo above????

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Aug 27, 2011 at 4:17 pm

“Rebecca” (March 28 – May 8)and “The Philadelphia Story” (Dec. 26 – Feb. 5) were the first films to run for six weeks in 1940. Up until then “Snow White…” held the record with five weeks in 1938. “The Philadelphia Story,” however, with its opening week gross of $130,000 did not break the one week gross of $134,800 set by “Top Hat” in 1934 and played 3 weeks.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Aug 15, 2011 at 2:39 pm

Jay, The general rule to warrant a holdover during the 1950s was that $88,000 had to be reached by early Sunday evening. You didn’t have to be rocket scientist however to know from the opening day how long a film might play. As you know, a four or five week run was more typical, films opening during the summer tended to last longer and gross more.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Aug 14, 2011 at 2:03 pm

Answer to EdBlank regarding grosses: Yes I have the exact figures of each week of every film from the day RCMH opened. As for Bambi, it’s gross(around $90,000 and $85,000(without consulting the archives)during the two weeks it played actually didn’t warrant a holdover. Perhaps it was the sadness of the story that kept parents from bringing children and also the fact that the Music Hall never had special prices for children. “Snow White…” was another story as it was so unique being the first full-length animated feature from Disney. It ran five weeks, as you know and grossed consistently over $100,000 over the entire run. It probably could have stayed longer, but the Hall was already backlogged with product. As you know, most films were booked for only one week with a possible one week holdover.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Aug 10, 2011 at 4:36 pm

Just a little something to amuse Tinseltoes: As an usher during the 7 week run of “North By Northwest”, the staff would make bets on whether all the white lights would go on and twinkle during the “Serenade to the Stars” finale…more often than not two or three strands would fail to light up as the “queen of the night” (or whatever she was) ascended from the stage floor almost to the top of the proscenium,her gown of lights gradually unfolding to an enormous size as she was lifted higher and higher. “NBN” broke the non-holiday opening week gross with $195,000. Previous non-holiday record was “High Society” with $190,000 in 1956.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Jul 26, 2011 at 1:45 pm

As a former Roxy usher 1956/1957, I was wondering if there is any interest in a reunion of ushers and/or staff who still might be around.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jul 24, 2011 at 7:03 pm

For most of you, this link won’t be news, but I thought I would just share a photo of myself (second left) as an RCMH in 1958 with a short article I wrote to accompany a review of “Zarkana” http://curtainup.com/zarkana.html Enjoy. Also would like to initiate a possible reunion of staff prior to the Music Hall ending its regular stage and film policy. Anyone interested?

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Dec 9, 2008 at 9:48 am

You are, indeed right about attendance and grosses Warren, but the point I was trying to make was that the Roxy made a good choice for the holidays. And 7th Voyage did a lot better than either the plodding Inn of Sixth Happiness or dull Rally Round the Flag would have done.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Dec 9, 2008 at 9:02 am

Nice comments Bill, “The 7th Voyage…” was not only a stunning visual treat and great family entertainment (still is) but also had the highest holiday gross ($190,000) in the Roxy history beating the record opening of “Forever Amber,” ($180,000) and second only to the grosses of “The Robe” ($264,000 opening week).

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Nov 24, 2008 at 11:35 am

Thanks Warren, You depressed the hell out of me. My only regret is that I was out of the country during that time and couldn’t get inside, take photos and steal anything that wasn’t nailed down. I do have a bricks from the Loew’s Grand Atlanta, Helen Hayes and Morosco Theaters.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Nov 22, 2008 at 12:52 pm

This link worked. Awesome, Glorious, tragic, and thank you Lost Memory. The one photo that still puzzles me (I seen it before) is the one with the huge crowd that appears to be running in the rotunda. It looks like a crush of people coming in from the outer lobby and not an orderly line of people entering theater after waiting for seats. Any guesses what this could be? It almost looks like an evacuation, except that they are heading in the wrong direction.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Roxy Theatre on Nov 22, 2008 at 11:43 am

Hate to be more dense than anyone else here but….how do I get the Roxy demolition photos. I clicked on the only link I saw below but that didn’t seem to do it.

Here are some Roxy related photos. Link is courtesy of “misterboo”.

posted by Lost Memory on Nov 21, 2008 at 1:20pm