Village

3915 S. University Avenue,
Little Rock, AR 72204

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Village

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The former UA Cinema 150 opened with an enormous dome roof and a 120 degree curved screen. In addition to standard 35mm, the theater also showed 70mm and D-150 formats. When this happened, a large BLUE curvulon is used.

After years of service, the UA Cinema 150 closed in May 2003. This was the last operating Dimension 150 theater in the country and represents another loss to that era of widescreen cinema.

The theater reopened as a concert venue in 2006.

Contributed by Richard Peterson, Cinema Treasures

Recent comments (view all 45 comments)

SeeingI
SeeingI on January 11, 2011 at 10:58 am

I am from Tennessee, but was on a family vacation when we saw “Starman” here in 1984. The venue made a huge impression on me! I am glad to find reference to it here.

Ross Melnick
Ross Melnick on July 19, 2011 at 9:56 pm

There are some interior images at this site.

jimseabough
jimseabough on March 15, 2012 at 1:58 pm

I remember going to this theatre when I was in college in 1968. Saw SOUTH PACIFIC reissue there and I am pretty sure it was a 70MM print.

dcbohn
dcbohn on April 30, 2012 at 10:26 am

I worked at the old UA Four, near the Southwest Mall, for about a year, in ‘72/'73, and any UA employee was allowed to see free movies at any other UA theater in Little Rock. My first wife was an employee at The Cinema 150 (That’s what we all knew it as), and we saw quite a few movies there. But… Well before that, I saw 'Ben-Hur’ at The Cinema, in 1969, for it’s 10th anniversary re-release. The chariot race, on that huge, curved screen, was absolutely AWESOME!!

corgi
corgi on March 6, 2013 at 2:50 pm

Saw Patton, True Grit, Tora! Tora! Tora! and other greats at this theatre in the 60’s and 70’s. I think they even had a world premier there not too long after opening. I lived just down Asher Avenue and could walk there although it was a dicey proposition at that intersection even in those days. :–)

dcbohn
dcbohn on March 6, 2013 at 7:06 pm

See my list on the IMDb, at http://www.imdb.com/list/dyuCm5hS9x0/

marysgranddaughter
marysgranddaughter on October 23, 2014 at 11:54 am

My Dad, Albert Campbell, was the projectionist at the UA Cinema 150 in 1970 when the local newspaper interviewed him and published the article. I have posted the pictures that were taken of the theatre for this interview. I was a senior in high school just after the article published and was very proud when a teacher inquired if that was my Dad. He began as an projectionist apprentice in the 1940’s and retired due to vision problems from diabetes in 1977….

dcbohn
dcbohn on October 23, 2014 at 5:26 pm

marysgranddaughter: I knew your dad pretty well. He was the head projectionist at the old UA Four theater, back in ‘72, when I worked there. He was pretty cool, and used to let us visit the projection booth any time we wanted.

marysgranddaughter
marysgranddaughter on October 26, 2014 at 12:35 am

dcbohn: That is so cool…My Dad lived and breathed theatres. He was given a little red projector as a child, which I still have, although it’s not totally intact now. I am so glad to hear from you. Do you still live in LR?

dcbohn
dcbohn on October 26, 2014 at 8:52 am

marysgranddaughter: No, my job transferred me to Ohio, back in ‘91. I hardly ever go to the movies any more. It’s just not nearly as much fun as in 'the good ol’ days'.

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