Loew's Metropolitan Theatre

392 Fulton Street,
Brooklyn, NY 11201

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Showing 1 - 25 of 132 comments

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on May 17, 2015 at 7:22 pm

There was a seldom-used entrance on Livingston Street, but usually the Livingston Street marquee was used to advertise the current attraction.

hdtv267 on May 17, 2015 at 5:33 pm

I only recall the entrance on Fulton Street.

robboehm on May 17, 2015 at 5:15 pm

Uploaded to photos from Brooklyn Pics. One is purported to be Smith near Fulton. The other Livingston. Were there multiple entrances or is Brooklyn Pics wrong.

johndereszewski on January 23, 2013 at 2:16 pm

The Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir, which now operates out of this old movie house, hit a home run in performing the Battle Hymn of the Republic at Monday’s Inauguration ceremony. Kudos to the choir, the congregation and the people of Brooklyn!

Al Alvarez
Al Alvarez on April 28, 2011 at 12:50 pm

The Metropolitan mezzanine did not over look the lobby as you can see in the first photo. I think that mezzanine shot may be of the RKO Kenmore, or some other Loews house.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on April 27, 2011 at 10:55 pm

The mezzazine lounge didn’t look like that when I frequented the theater, from 1983 to closing. The opening had been covered over by a floor, making a very large lounge space with very little decor.

Trolleyguy on April 27, 2011 at 10:48 pm

Here’s a couple of old interior pictures from the collection of the Wisconsin Historical Society. Click on the small pictures to expand them.



TLSLOEWS on March 27, 2011 at 10:16 pm

Thanks Al ,you are so right.

Al Alvarez
Al Alvarez on March 27, 2011 at 10:03 pm

The Cineplex Odeon take-over was in the late eighties. There was no Cineplex Odeon in 1978.

MarkieS on March 27, 2011 at 8:24 pm

Well, I’m sure she attracted rather large crowds. Right after Hell’s Angels, Jean Harlow fan clubs sprang up around the country, even though she had yet to prove herself as the talented comedienne she would become.

MarkieS on March 26, 2011 at 7:51 pm

Just read that Jean Harlow made a personal appearance there in 1932 to publicize Beast of the City. That must have caused pandemonium!

TLSLOEWS on August 11, 2010 at 2:35 pm

Very nice link Thanks again Tinseltoes.

Mike Rogers
Mike Rogers on May 13, 2010 at 2:11 pm

MY sister took a picture of a New York theatre with “MOONRAKER” on it.I would love to find that picture.It could be this theatre?

TLSLOEWS on December 8, 2009 at 8:53 pm

I like the way the they had 2 marquees one on each end.Those were the days.

Bway on November 23, 2009 at 9:59 am

I have to agree. A theater converted to a church is “not” lost. This is an excellent example of a beautiful building restored, and still 100% here, even if it’s not a theater anymore. Loews 175th St (United Palace), the Valencia, and a whole string of others are also examples.
The alternative could have been a bad conversion into retail with gutting, or even worse, a pile of rubble.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on November 21, 2009 at 9:50 pm

I was in the restored church the other day, and it is stunning. Even though it’s not a movie theater, there’s still a show going on.

And I believe the theater was twinned – and then quadded — by Loew’s years before Cineplex Odeon took over.

GaryCohen on November 21, 2009 at 12:16 pm

The Loews Metropolitan (or Loews Met as we old Brooklynites used to call it,) was one of 4 beautiful Golden-Age theaters Downtown Brooklyn: The Brooklyn Fox, The Paramount, the RKO Albee and the Loews Met. It was one about 3 blocks from the Albee abd one block from the large A&S department store (now Macys.) Like most golden-age Loews, it was an enormous theater with a large fountain with wishing-well in the inner lobby.) Starting in the early ‘60s, I would sometimes go with my father there and later my friends, taking the number 2 IRT from East New York to get there.
It ususally showed films from MGM, Paramount or Columbia. Among the films I saw there were: “Lawrence of Arabia” (right after its roadshow run,) the Brando “Mutiny on the Bounty.” John Wayne in “Circus World,” Charlton Heston in “Major Dundee” and Jerry Lewis in “Whos Minding the Store.” I seem to recall some Elvis’ films playing there as well, I think “Blue Hawaii.”
As the area started deteriorating in the ‘70s, the Met had to resort to showing double-features of grade-D horror films. (The Albee at the same time was showing Kung-fu and Blaxploitation films.) Soon afterward, it was bought by Cineplex Odeon and converted into 4 theaters. It reopened at Christmas 1978 with great fanfare showcasing “Superman” and Clint Eastwood in “Every Which Way But Loose.” (I was working downtown at the time.) However, it was not to last. When I was working downtown again in 2001, the theater was now closed for good and being converted into a Church, the ultimate fate for many golden-age theaters in deteriorating areas.
The Loews Met was a beautiful theater, that outlasted the other beautiful golden-age theaters in downtown Brooklyn. Now it only lives in our memories.

TLSLOEWS on November 5, 2009 at 1:12 pm

Great pictures on the page keep them coming.

MPol on May 25, 2009 at 10:56 am

I don’t reside in Brooklyn, or in the NY-NJ area generally, fairtail, nor am I religions in any way, but thanks for the suggestion.

fairytail on May 24, 2009 at 10:46 pm

Oh my warren is starting trouble again. I will pray for you. This is a lovely church. You must pay it a visit one day.

MPol on May 23, 2009 at 12:37 am

My apologies to you too, saps.

MPol on May 23, 2009 at 12:36 am

Sorry about that, Lost Memory.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on May 22, 2009 at 5:29 pm

Can I get an amen, somebody?

MPol on May 22, 2009 at 5:17 pm

Didn’t you hear me? (lol)

MPol on May 22, 2009 at 10:25 am

Oh…my bad. It’s closed. Sorry to see such a gorgeous place close down. Wonder what they’re going to do with it.