Koster & Bial's Music Hall

135 West 34th Street,
New York, NY 10001

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AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on February 14, 2010 at 3:33 am

The Manhattan Opera House at 311 West 34th Street mentioned in the previous 2005 posts was showing German War Films in 1915 and is still standing today.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manhattan_Center

dowra
dowra on November 28, 2009 at 2:19 am

I have 5 programs from this theater all from 1901, any idea of the value?

dowra
dowra on November 28, 2009 at 2:19 am

I have 5 programs from this theater all from 1901, any idea of the value?

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on November 27, 2006 at 3:58 pm

Koster & Bial’s is mentioned in the 1897-98 edition of the Julius Cahn Official Theatrical Guide. It says “This is one of the newest and most beautiful places of amusement in the city, and was erected by Oscar Hammerstein, who intended it for English grand opera, only to be, however, converted to its present use, as a thoroughly first-class music hall, after failing in its original intent.” The manager is listed as Albert Bial. The seating capacity is given as 3,748. (But that figure may include standees). Ticket prices were 25 cents to $1.50. The proscenium opening was 42 feet wide x 42 feet high; and the stage was 46 feet deep. The theatre was on the ground floor.

ERD
ERD on December 16, 2005 at 3:24 pm

Mr. Farley is correct The theatre I mentioned in the above post was located at 311 West 34th Street.

bamtino
bamtino on December 16, 2005 at 12:49 pm

The Manhattan Opera House to which ERD refers opened in 1904 and was a different theatre. Hammerstein’s first MOH is the theatre to which the text refers.

ERD
ERD on December 16, 2005 at 12:28 pm

Oscar Hammerstein(I) did not fail running the Manhattan Opera House.
After 4 years, the Metropolitan Opera House offered Hammerstein
1.2 million dollars not to produce operas for 10 years. He accepted this and went on to other things, eventually selling the theatre.

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on December 15, 2005 at 3:50 pm

Although short-lived, it was a famous Vaude theatre in its day. Early film shorts proved very popular at vaudeville houses like this. Bravo to Damien Farley for profiling here what is now a long-forgotten theatre.