Vue Bury

Pilsworth Road,
Bury, BL9 8RS

Unfavorite No one has favorited this theater yet

Vue Bury

Located on the Pilsworth Industrial Estate, Bury, Lancashire (now part of Greater Mancheste). The 12-screen Warner Cinema opened on 16th June 1989 with actress Liza Minelli attending the opening. Seating capacities in the screens ranged from 559, down to 166.

In 1996 it was re-branded Warner Village, and in 2004, it was re-branded Vue.

The Vue was closed in July 2010, when a new 10-screen Vue opened on the Rock Triangle development in the town centre, opposite the former Odeon Theatre. The former Warner/Warner Village/Vue Bury was demolished in April 2016.

Contributed by Ken Roe

Recent comments (view all 4 comments)

Philip Picturedrome
Philip Picturedrome on August 14, 2010 at 3:24 am

This was Warner’s first UK Multiplex, and the ninth multiplex in the UK.
It was advertised as “The Largest Cinema Complex in Europe”.

CF100
CF100 on October 11, 2018 at 2:18 am

“UrbEx” photos are available over at 28DaysLater, including for one visit dated January 2015. Throughly “smashed up!”

A “ghost” view of the demolished cinema can be seen in satellite images on the desktop version of Google Earth. (For some reason, presently Google Maps is still showing an older image in which the cinema building is still intact.)

Per Google’s Usage Guidelines, which allow for limited reposting, I have uploaded the exported satellite image to the Photos section for this cinema.

The essential layout of the cinema is visible, including foyer, partitions between auditoria, and the curve on which the seating was fitted therein.

LARGE_screen_format
LARGE_screen_format on October 11, 2018 at 5:57 am

Sad to see some of the first multiplexes in the UK going the way of the dinosaur rather than being refurbished etc.

CF100
CF100 on October 12, 2018 at 4:11 pm

LARGE_screen_format: Low-rise developments with flat parking are so much more flexible than high density multi-level developments, and also typically offer ample free parking.

With parts of the UK overscreened there are now many secondary multiplexes that require considerable investment to bring them up to expectations.

It is odd to see multiplexes turning into “flea pits” and also “partial” refurbishments where not all finishes or fittings are replaced. Whatever their merits, and certainly presentation standards and auditoria haven’t always been adequate, and some might describe them bland, one might think of multiplexes as, above all else, mostly clean, shiny and new. Not anymore!

Still, not too much reason for nostaglia with the increasing number of “next generation” multiplexes, whether refurbishments/alterations/extensions of existing or entirely new build, with fancy foyers, PLF auditoria and luxury seating.

You must login before making a comment.

New Comment

Subscribe Want to be emailed when a new comment is posted about this theater?
Just login to your account and subscribe to this theater