Cairo Theatre

11021 S. Main Street,
Los Angeles, CA 90061

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Originally opened as the Tempest Theatre in the late-1920’s, the Cairo Theatre was one of many theatres along S. Main Street. It disappeared many years ago.

Contributed by William Gabel

Recent comments (view all 11 comments)

annalynn7199
annalynn7199 on April 1, 2006 at 4:03 pm

I have an orginal Member mickey mouse club card and pin from 1933 from the cairo theater. I was looking for information on the theatre and the card. If you have any please e-mail me at Thanks.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on April 1, 2006 at 9:46 pm

ken mc: I just saw you question from last December. The Cairo would have been in the block just south of 110th Street, which was almost ¾ of a mile south of Century- in fact, only a few blocks north of Imperial Highway.

Ken Roe posted a list of the 24 theatres being operated by the Edwards Circuit in 1950, and the Cairo (unless there were two theatres of that name in Los Angeles at the time) was among them. The list as in one of the comments on the page for the El Cameo Theater.

annalynn7199
annalynn7199 on April 10, 2006 at 11:18 pm

would you happen to know who owned the theatre in 1933? thanks

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on April 11, 2006 at 12:31 am

cmmc: The first comment above by ronp says that Ivan and Eula Hanson ran the Cairo for 12 years before they built the Atlantic Theatre in Long Beach in 1941, so they must have been the operators in 1933.

I didn’t know there was a Mickey Mouse Club as early as 1933. I searched on Google, and found that the first Mickey Mouse Club of the era was formed at the Fox Dome Theatre in Ocean Park, California in 1929. In 1932 the club reached one million members. (This information from an official Disney Company page.)

Here is a link to a PDF file (only 180K, so easily downloaded) which is mostly about copyright law, and apparently has to do with a court case, but which discusses the early Micky Mouse Clubs for several pages, beginning on page 10.

annalynn7199
annalynn7199 on April 11, 2006 at 12:42 am

In the Message Ronp left it mentioned Ran I was not sure if they also owned it at the time or ran the company for someone else. I Have searched all over the net and this is the only site which mentions the Cairo theatre. I’ve also Have only come across one site which has another orginal mambership card and it is sitting in a museum in tennesse. But to no luck no others yet. I do have pics of the card and pin if anyone interested just e-mail me. Thanks for the help.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on April 11, 2006 at 1:10 am

cmcc: As operators of the Cairo, I suspect that the Hansens were owners of the business, though not necessarily of the building (many theatres were built by speculators and then leased to operators.) Most small suburban theatres such as the Cairo were not operated by circuits, but by independent business people. ronp’s comments on the Atlantic Theatre indicate that the Hansens actually owned that theatre building, but say only that they “operated” the Cairo. Whether they owned the Cairo building or not, it seems likely that they were the independent owners of the business, at least until 1941.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on June 3, 2007 at 5:15 pm

On 1/22/50, the features were “Story of Seabiscuit” and “Intruder in the Dust”. Phone number was PL5-3013.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on June 17, 2007 at 11:55 pm

11021 is a parking lot.11001 looks like a theater, but no record of one at that address, as far as I know.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on October 20, 2008 at 4:57 am

11021 S. Main is listed as the address of the Tempest Theatre in the 1929 L.A. City Directory, so that should be added as an aka.

MrWillM
MrWillM on February 7, 2010 at 12:35 am

The Vacant Lot at the NW Corner of 111th and Main shown on Google was the location of the Cairo. I lived as a child at 131 W. 112th St and attended many Saturday Matinees at the Cairo in the very early 50s. 10 cent admission. I don’t remember when it closed forever or whether the building was still standing after the 1965 Watts Riots when much of that neighborhood was destroyed. Like many old theaters in decaying neighborhoods, it was a church for awhile and deserted after that.

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