Loew's Victoria Theatre

233 West 125th Street,
New York, NY 10027

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Showing 1 - 25 of 94 comments

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on November 23, 2012 at 11:22 am

It’s working for me and it is the Victoria.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on November 23, 2012 at 7:47 am

Your link needs to be “activated.” And do you really mean “Loew’s Victory” (not Loew’s Victoria)? Loew’s Victory was in the Bronx and has its own listing at Cinema Treasures.

Movieplace
Movieplace on October 23, 2012 at 11:15 am

SAVE LOEW’S VICTORIA page on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Save-Loews-Victoria/446620328709389

Movieplace
Movieplace on September 25, 2012 at 2:15 pm

Also, Ed Solero, that is the box office but it is not a free standing one. It is still there though. The entry is rather small for such a large theater.

Movieplace
Movieplace on September 25, 2012 at 2:13 pm

Thank you Nicholas for the credit. I have been posting this all over the place.

I read an article yesterday from the New York Daily News and I can’t believe it. The State of New York has cleared a final hurdle for the development of the the site upon which sits my beloved Loew’s Victoria. This treasure designed by the great Thomas Lamb will become part of a hotel and apartment tower which will be built on the site and the lobby and foyer of the Victoria will be preserved and used as part of a ballroom conference and convention venue in the new space.

However the auditorium will have to be demolished the developer says. Why is there not one thought about saving the auditorium? That is the space that could serve as a convention center, even a ballroom. The theater is not in such horrible shape, it can be saved. Harry Macklowe tried to demolish the Hudson Theater but was stopped. His plans thwarted, he accepted defeat and restored the theater and uses it as a conference room / convention space. Why not the Victoria?

Instead of being excited by this, I hope Harlem wakes up before all of it’s too late, before all the treasures are gone and the “white hot” 125th street corridor is just another mall that could be any where in this country.

To paraphrase the New York Times, it’s the buildings that make a city special and we will be judged not by what we have built but what we have destroyed. To paraphrase another New Yorker “enough already”. When will we learn that we live in the most special city in the world and it got that way through it’s buildings, whether a tenement, a mansion or a theater and the people who built them and those who use them.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on September 25, 2012 at 8:57 am

Nice photos in your link, Nick.

Nicholas Vargelis
Nicholas Vargelis on September 24, 2012 at 3:34 pm

What sad news, it looks like the re-development plan that has been approved will demolish the auditorium and stage house !

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/harlem-victoria-theater-hub-arts-cultural-center-article-1.1117287

“The Victoria’s cavernous auditorium will be demolished, but its ornate lobby, signature fountain, original marquee, grand stairway and gilded chandeliers will be preserved.”

AND BEHIND the multiplexing is a carefully preserved mostly intact single screen auditorium ! (see photos in link below)

http://newyorktoursbygary.blogspot.fr/2011_11_08_archive.html

“Mr. Blake, sensitive to the historical and irreplaceable aspects of this theater, had partitions put in to create 5 auditoriums that would leave no scars and could be easily removed.”

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on August 28, 2012 at 4:28 am

Possibly, markp… I was just curious if anyone knew for sure that the ticket booth depicted in that photo is actually the Victoria’s.

markp
markp on August 27, 2012 at 3:21 am

Ed, somewhere here on CT, I saw an old studio ad someone posted for another theatre from the early/mid 70’s. Under Manhattan I remember was listed Loews Victoria 125th St. Maybe thats how the photographer meant to refer to it?

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on August 26, 2012 at 7:15 pm

Just posted this image from a July 25th article in the NY Times about local photographer Dawoud Bey. The image is dated 1976 and is labeled by the Times as depicting the “Loew’s 125th Street Movie Theater”… Could they mean the Victoria? Did the Victoria have a free-standing outdoor ticket booth? It doesn’t appear that way in the image posted here from the late 1960’s, with “Tony Rome” on the marquee.

LuisV
LuisV on July 19, 2012 at 10:07 am

It has been reported today that the redevelopment of Harlem’s Victoria Theater is moving forward. Sadly, only the lobby and “a fountain” are being preserved. No word in this article about the facade or whether a replica of the original marquee will be installed.

http://therealdeal.com/blog/2012/07/19/state-approves-massive-harlem-development-plan/

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on April 24, 2012 at 4:47 pm

I wish you could post the ads for these bits of history that you provide, tinseltoes. We all seem to love old movie advertising.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on February 10, 2012 at 8:10 am

Seventy years ago today, Loew’s Victoria and Loew’s 116th Street opened the exclusive NYC premiere engagement of “Lucky Ghost,” with wide-eyed comedian Mantan Moreland and an “All-Star Colored Cast.” The low-budget Dixie National production was released by indie distributor Ted Toddy, but received top billing at the Victoria and 116th Street over MGM’s Edward G. Robinson melodrama, “Unholy Partners.” But at the rest of the Loew’s NYC neighborhood houses, “Unholy Partners” topped the bill, and with MGM’s Gracie Allen comedy, “Mr. & Mrs. North,” in support.

LuisV
LuisV on August 31, 2011 at 2:04 pm

You beat me to it Ed! This was always something of a long shot for preservation and I’m not quite sure how much was there to preserve, but at least some of it will live on. Of course we wish we could save them all, but we can’t. We need to dedicate our efforts where the true potentials are: The Loew’s Canal is foremost on my mind as our best hope for bringing back a faded beauty in Manhattan. We have succeeded in saving stunners like Radio City, The New Amsterdam, The Hollywood, all five Wonder Theaters, The Saint George, The Beacon and, of course, the Apollo. I fear for the RKO Keiths Richmond Hill. However, I do have hope for the Brooklyn Paramount and The Jackson in Queens. As for the Victoria, we will still keep the dignified exterior though I hope with that hideous marquee removed and perhaps a period marquee in its place. I hope they make good use of the chandeliers and grand stairs.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on August 31, 2011 at 1:05 pm

According to the article, the facade will be preserved, but it looks like the theater’s interior will be gutted, with certain architectural elements – chandeliers, a fountain and a grand staircase – to be incorporated into the new space. When completed, there will be two small theaters – one seating 199 and the other only 99 patrons.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on August 31, 2011 at 11:07 am

When is this revamped website bringing back automatic activation of links to other websites? Mr. Jackson’s welcome contribution doesn’t connect in its present form. One can only do it manually by enclosing the name of the website in brackets [nytimes] and then enclosing the rest in parentheses.

Michael D. Jackson
Michael D. Jackson on August 31, 2011 at 10:46 am

This theater will get a make-over and reopen for live entertainment. See today’s New York Times article: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/31/realestate/commercial/along-harlems-125th-street-redevelopment-projects-advance.html

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on April 6, 2011 at 9:03 am

In March, 1948, Loew’s Victoria presented the world premiere engagement of “The Fight Never Ends,” a B&W melodrama starring boxing champion Joe Louis and Ruby Dee, simultaneously with three other Loew’s theatres in African-American neighborhoods. At Loew’s Victoria and Loew’s 116th Street in Manhattan, the independently-produced film was supported by Columbia’s Ginger Rogers-Cornel Wilde starrer, “It Had To Be You.” At Loew’s Burland in the Bronx, MGM’s Technicolor musical, “Good News,” was the second feature. Bottom of the bill at Loew’s Brevoort in Brooklyn was 20th-Fox’s “Daisy Kenyon,” starring Joan Crawford.

jahlaune
jahlaune on April 4, 2011 at 2:16 pm

Thank you guys or girls VERY much

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on April 3, 2011 at 8:08 am

Josephine Baker gave only a single performance at the Victoria Theatre in 1973 as a benefit for the Harlem division of the Police Athletic League (PAL)…Loew’s Victoria had a limited connection with vaudeville due to intense competition from other theatres in the area. Further details can be found here: http://www.villageviews.org/victoria.pdf

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on April 3, 2011 at 7:09 am

Josephine Baker performed here in 1973.

jahlaune
jahlaune on April 3, 2011 at 12:24 am

does anyone know if they ever presented stage shows?If so what performers

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on March 21, 2011 at 1:33 pm

That should be Buddy not Bubby!

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on March 21, 2011 at 1:32 pm

A quick shot of this theatre and the Apollo can be seen in the movie,The Buddy Holly Story before the scene were Bubby and the Crickets performed at the Apollo.