Wollaston Theatre

14 Beale Street,
Quincy, MA 02170

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Showing 1 - 25 of 149 comments

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on September 30, 2013 at 1:33 pm

Beside the Wollaston Theatre and school auditoriums, the only other theater in Quincy now is the Masonic Auditorium, located on Hancock St. in Quincy Center and very near the Quincy Center MBTA station. It was ruined by a massive fire today, 9-30-2013.

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on February 1, 2012 at 9:36 pm

Seems reasonable; most of these places, once they are saved, need live performances to stay in business.

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on February 1, 2012 at 2:26 pm

The Quincy Patriot Ledger yesterday ran one of its reader polls: “Do you think the Wolly will ever reopen as a movie house?” (voting is conducted on-line). The results: 350 responses- Yes- 16%, No- 83%.

PopcornNRoses
PopcornNRoses on February 1, 2012 at 8:56 am

Here’s a link to the original Patriot Ledger story http://www.patriotledger.com/entertainment/x842391792/Wollaston-Theatre-sold-to-C-Mart-owner

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on January 31, 2012 at 1:37 pm

The Quincy Patriot Ledger of January 31 has a front page story about the sale. The sales price was only $600,000. The buyer is a business man from Weston who runs Asian supermarkets, the C-Mart chain. He’s been trying to open an outlet in North Quincy but has been thwarted by various zoning issues. He says he is not sure what he will do with the theater. The seller, Mrs. Yvonne Chandler, is quoted in the article as remarking that she would “rather forget the whole thing.” The article was written by reporter Jack Encarnacao.

HowardBHaas
HowardBHaas on January 30, 2012 at 8:45 pm

The new owner says he has is looking for community input- http://www.boston.com/yourtown/news/quincy/2012/01/quincys_wollaston_theater_sold.html

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on January 30, 2012 at 7:20 pm

Link to the place where you read this news, please?

BobSchlapowitz
BobSchlapowitz on January 30, 2012 at 7:03 pm

Apparently the Wolly has been sold and is going to be turned into an Asian Market, because Quincy clearly needs another one of those.

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on February 12, 2011 at 1:30 pm

Today’s Quincy Patriot Ledger has a feature article which reports that two entities, a group and an individual, have approached the mayor’s office with an interest in going forward with the Wolly restoration project. There will be a meeting at 630PM on Monday, Feb. 14 at the Thomas Crane Library in Quincy Center to discuss the theater. Restoration cost is estimated at $6M – $7M, which seems rather low for theater projects like this one, but possible, I guess.

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on November 10, 2010 at 1:48 pm

The 1927 Film Daily Yearbook lists the Wollaston Theatre which was then just opening. It says it presents movies 2 days per week. There was a theatrical stock company in residence during the Wollaston’s first years so that would have limited movie presentations. It also says that it has only 400 seats, which is way too low.

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on October 26, 2010 at 1:49 pm

The Patriot Ledger ran one its polls recently asking “Should the Wollaston Theatre be preserved and reopened, or torn down and the site developed??” There were 556 responses: Saved- 61%; Torn down-38%.

RealmQuests
RealmQuests on October 23, 2010 at 6:35 pm

Darn. :/ …thanks for the update, Ron.

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on October 23, 2010 at 11:31 am

There is a front-page story in the Quincy Patriot Ledger today: “The Deal to Save ‘Wolly’ Theater Crumbles – City, Developer Back Away from Project”. The city’s planning developer, Street-Works, has dropped the Wollaston Theatre project. Too expensive, estimated cost of renovations: $7M. No return or profit possible in this undertaking. The deed for the building is still held by Mrs. Chandler. Street-Works has paid her a total of $145K toward the price of $1.14M and has skipped further payments and will not make any more. There are currently 4 retail tenants in the front of the building. The Mayor now feels that preserving this theater is pretty much a lost cause, unless someone with deep pockets steps in.

spectrum
spectrum on October 12, 2010 at 9:02 pm

The website is back up. Latest news is the theatre has been acquired and protected, but it looks like latest updates are from 2009.

nvargelis
nvargelis on April 29, 2010 at 4:45 am

Strange, the ‘Save the Wollaston Theater’ website has gone off-line. I wonder what is happening with the plans to clean up and re-open the theater?

http://www.wollastontheater.com/

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on March 24, 2010 at 1:59 pm

A comprehensive set of photos, Nicolas V.

nvargelis
nvargelis on March 20, 2010 at 10:47 pm

interior photographs of the Wallaston Theater taken a few years ago:

View link

for more info contact:

nvargelis [at] yahoo.fr

nvargelis
nvargelis on March 20, 2010 at 10:47 pm

interior photographs of the Wallaston Theater taken a few years ago:

View link

for more info contact:

nvargelis [at] yahoo.fr

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on March 11, 2010 at 1:54 pm

The MBTA parking lot at Wollaston station (near the theater) is for T passengers only, and is full all day on weekdays. One weekday in early afternoon a few years ago I drove to Wollaston to partonize a specialty shop there; I found the entire area choked with parked cars; drove round and round, and finally parked in the private lot of a business; hurried over to the store and back. Parking near the Wollaston Theater is a Big problem.

Anali
Anali on March 10, 2010 at 2:38 pm

Ron Newman – From my conversation with Jeff, it seems that will depend on the type of use. If all the use is in the evening or weekends, that could be possible. But if some use is during weekdays, and the parking lot is filled up, that might not be enough parking.

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on March 10, 2010 at 2:23 pm

This is right next to a T station, so is parking really needed at all? Can’t people just park in the surrounding neighborhood and walk to the theatre?

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on March 10, 2010 at 2:15 pm

Anali’s recent interview posted above with Jeff Levien mentions what I think is a big problem for the Wollaston Theater: the lack of parking in that area. Years ago there was a huge parking lot across from the left (south) sidewall of the auditorium, but that now has buildings on it.

Anali
Anali on March 3, 2010 at 5:12 pm

Today I spoke with Jeff Levien from Street-Works for an update about the theatre. Here’s a link to my blog post about it.

View link

rsalters (Ron Salters)
rsalters (Ron Salters) on January 23, 2010 at 2:06 pm

Michael Cummings Jr- I don’t know what flick was playing at the Wollaston on Fri Nov 22, 1963 but it was not raining that day. It was a sunny, mild afternoon. I was on a bus from Fields Corner station to Quincy Center running down Hancock St. right past the Wollaston Th. and recall the news headlines: Patriot Ledger: “Kennedy Assassinated” and Boston Traveler: “JFK Slain”. It was a shocking event, even for people who weren’t particularly fans of the president.

MichaelCummingsJr
MichaelCummingsJr on December 29, 2009 at 10:37 pm

One of my earliest memories is the rainy afternoon that I saw a Christmas/Santa Movie at the Wollaston Theater. Myself, Mom and my 5 yr old sister, Eileen. I was 3 and a half at the time. The movie was about how Santa Claus got kidnapped by an evil (gang) or some wierd crook(?) and there were “not going to be any presents this year”, as Santa had said on the previews/for that movie.

I only (really) remember one small scene of the movie. Santa, with his head tilted forward, was listening to this giant ‘Ear’ type machine. Through the big Ear-contraption, Santa could hear all of the children from around the world, if they were good (or not) and exactly what the children wanted for, toys that particular Christmas. It is strange what visions ‘stick in your mind’ to become actual (real) memories. Like an old black and white polaroid in your head that you can ‘pull out’ and revisit, time and time again.

The other memory seems much smaller and insignificant. Though, I knew, at the actual time, it was huge. Now, when I look back, however, I realize that it was one of those ‘defining moments’ that actually mold a person, somehow. I remember standing out by the front curb (was it Billings Road?) at Beale St. My Dad had just dropped off my Mom, Eileen and I across the street, quickly, in traffic. He rushed back, in the VW Beetle, to Beach St. (home) to closely moniter the old black and white TV, which they both had been watching with full attention, earlier. (As I was told years later).

My memory was that Wollaston Square looked like a huge and scary and grey City (like when we would take the trains in to Filene’s Basement, in Boston). I recall holding my Mom and Eileen by the hand and that, I had stopped right before the front of the marquee, while still in the street. My memory is of staring at the water running down the street, by the curb (which seemed about as high as a 2 foot wall). My Mom was gently tugging at my hand, which was warmly-clasped in hers. “Come on Mikey, up”, Mom pleaded in a cracked voice. I did not budge even though Eileen pulled my other hand, again and again, while pleading; “Hurry, we’re going to miss the start of the movie”! I knew I was not going to make it over that curb and the flowing rain water. Something was definetly wrong. Something very sad in my Mom’s voice. I did not recognize her tone. I had never heard her voice like that, ever. A very deep uneasy feeling suddenly seized me. I tilted my head up to look at Mom. My Mom had water coming down from her eyes, like the water that flowed in the street, as if a thin stream, by the curb. Suddenly, like a wave on the beach, It hit me and only many years later I figured out. I had never seen tears in my Mom’s blue eyes before that very afternoon. Mom’s patient eyes were always a beautiful blue. Now they were reddish and sad. I had never seen my Mom with so much hurt and sadness. So much pain.

I had made it over the curb, even remembered that one tiny scene in the movie. I do not recall anything else about that day. The significance. I do remember that the way I saw things, from then forward, were always a little bit different. Some how everything was different after that day. My little world changed that afternoon. That day that I learned that even Santa, himself, could get kidnapped and that Mommies and Daddies actually CAN cry (and sometimes do cry). My world was a bit colder. A little more sad. Things were not quite the same after that November afternoon in 1963.

If anyone recalls the name of the movie that was playing at the Wolly Theater, on November 22, 1963, please email me here or at

I enjoyed reading the memories of that old theater. This magical place has touched so many lives, many hearts, and made many wonderful memories. I am 49, now, and live in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with my own children. Every annual trip back to Milton, I always find time to see that beautiful old theater in Wollaston…..

Michael Cummings, Jr.