Lake Theatre

601 Lake Avenue,
Lake Worth, FL 33460

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DavidZornig
DavidZornig on May 19, 2017 at 6:27 pm

Palm Beach Post article about the Lake and other Palm Beach area theatres.

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/entertainment/ghost-buildings-the-lost-movie-theaters-palm-beach-county/JR3HksX4rLOpSzsxsZk91O/

DavidZornig
DavidZornig on April 5, 2017 at 4:49 pm

Circa 1940’s photo added courtesy of Alvin Lederer.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on July 16, 2013 at 12:53 pm

This page from the Palm Beach Post web log has several images of the Lake Theatre, including an early drawing from the office of architect Roy Benjamin, showing the proposed building with a different marquee and without the rounded corner.

justLauren
justLauren on August 21, 2012 at 4:54 pm

This building is now home to the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. Great place to view works by local artists, shop locally handmade gifts, find out about cultural events & organizations, etc. It’s free and open to the public Tues-Sat from 10am to 5pm.

http://www.palmbeachculture.com/contactus

sporridge
sporridge on June 13, 2011 at 8:02 pm

This was formerly in the ABC Florida State chain.

sporridge
sporridge on February 5, 2011 at 9:12 pm

As for movies nowadays on Lake Avenue, I can report the nearby Lake Worth Playhouse’s Stonzek Theatre (a 48-seat black box space) is alive and thriving with art house fare. Even with limited space, they’ve proven worthwhile successors to the still much-missed Carefree.

http://www.lakeworthplayhouse.org/indie_films.html

sporridge
sporridge on February 5, 2011 at 9:03 pm

If you’ve tried the link directly above, click on “Pasta Palace/Palm Beach Post/Jan. 9 1976” for the ad itself.

Walking past the building last night, noticed signs announcing the Palm Beach County Cultural Council would soon be setting up headquarters. Turns out the family donated the building in Robert M. Montgomery’s memory. Click below for (presently) a partial exterior shot with the new signage:

View link

Then go here for the announcement:

View link

sporridge
sporridge on February 14, 2010 at 6:05 pm

A forgotten interlude in the Lake Theatre’s career: mid-70s incarnation as the Pasta Palace, where diners could watch classic movies as they ate:

View link

Roloff
Roloff on October 24, 2008 at 4:35 am

What a shame the building is now sitting vacant. I went to $wap Shop Drive-in in Lake Worth two years ago, not knowing about this gorgeous (though closed) site.

The postcard mentioned above can be seen with a better color rendition and in a larger size on my flickr stream: View link
Know that I scan all my cards at 600dpi and clean them in that size, and that I can email a higher res image for a (personal, non-commercial) repro for on the wall or so.

Patsy
Patsy on January 23, 2007 at 5:53 am

First the Lake Theatre is changed and then the Paramount in Palm Beach. Such a shame.

Patsy
Patsy on January 23, 2007 at 5:52 am

Perhaps the high profile Mr. Montgomery could return it to a theatre as that just might succeed!

Patsy
Patsy on January 23, 2007 at 5:51 am

I love viewing the vintage post card of the art moderne Lake Theatre posted on Sept. 23, 2004. I wonder if the lobby was changed much after the renovations were made though I would certainly understand the auditorium floor being ‘flattened’ to create the museum space. Again, such a shame.

Patsy
Patsy on January 23, 2007 at 5:48 am

Tom N: Such a shame that the PBICA is now closed especially after the decision was made years ago to discontinue the theatre so now the residents of Lake Worth have neither!

Tom10
Tom10 on January 23, 2007 at 5:06 am

The Lake Theater building is currently closed. When Palm Beach CC could no longer operate the museum, philanthropist Robert Montgomery bought it and re-opened it as the Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art. When it became a financial burden to continue its operation, and when no other supporters could be found, he closed the museum. A few years ago, the slope of the auditorium floor was flattened to create the museum space.

Patsy
Patsy on January 21, 2007 at 10:17 am

I’m sure this PBCCMA is very nice, but sure wish it was still the Lake Theatre.

Patsy
Patsy on March 30, 2006 at 7:11 am

After clicking on the name, Roy Benjamin I see that 19 theatres in GA, FL and one in MS were connected with him and many are being restored and remaining as theatres.

Patsy
Patsy on March 30, 2006 at 7:00 am

Two years ago I was on Lucerne Avenue during a visit to FL, but I wasn’t able to stop and step inside the former Lake Theatre to look around. Another nearby former theatre site was the Paramount in Palm Beach which is now a church. Sections of the original lobby’s green wood ceiling can be seen towards the back near the church area. Also original floor to ceiling green and white columns with the famous happy/sad faces are still there. Many wonderful b/w photos of the theatre in its heyday and photos of the many celebrity artists who appeared at the Paramount are on the walls at you enter the front door. So the Paramount Theatre history has been preserved in this way for visitors. I have digital photos of my visit if you wish to see them. My email is on my profile page.

Patsy
Patsy on March 30, 2006 at 6:41 am

Tom: Yes, the importance of this building escaping demolition and the fate of other downtown structures is the best news despite the changes over the years to the former theatre on Lucerne Avenue. I hope that a tenant(s) can be found to occupy this downtown site.

Tom10
Tom10 on March 30, 2006 at 5:33 am

Patsy: It was changed to its present day look prior to the establishment of the historic district and/or appearance review. I agree that, without the marquee, the building no longer really looks like a movie theater. It no longer is a movie theater. It’s simply an Art Deco/Moderne building. And still, it did avoid demolition, escaping the fate of other downtown buildings.

Patsy
Patsy on March 28, 2006 at 5:31 pm

IMO, if you compare the theatre and its vintage postcard appearance to how it was changed I can’t imagine the planning board agreeing to that present day look.

Tom10
Tom10 on March 27, 2006 at 3:24 am

Patsy: I’d have to check, and I think the theater is in a historic district. I know it’s in an area where any alteration to the appearance must be reviewed by the planning board. I’m not sure what level of landmark designation it has. As of this date, it’s unused. It would be nice if another non-profit/arts organization could occupy the space.

Patsy
Patsy on March 26, 2006 at 4:18 am

Tom: Thanks for the info and link! The vintage postcard of the Lake was wonderful to see…only wish it still looked that way as downtown Lake Worth along Lucerne is a quaint community near the ocean and would benefit with an original theatre in its midst!

Tom10
Tom10 on March 26, 2006 at 3:59 am

Patsy: I regret that my links are dated now. Robert Montgomery, a West Palm Beach attorney and philanthropist who underwrote the Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art, was unable to find others to support the museum, forcing closure. Currently, from the outside, the building looks about the same. Several weeks ago, there was some kind of construction going on inside. Over five years ago, the sloping floor from the theater was removed and made flat. The balcony and projection booth were made into exhibit space. So, the interior is no longer a theater. In its heyday, the museum had planned to build an annex, also in Art Moderne style, across the alley in the rear of the building for additional offices and meeting rooms. Try this URL and scroll down just below mid-page for severa views of this theatre. No guarantees as to how long the link will last. Tom

Patsy
Patsy on March 15, 2006 at 3:53 pm

No wonder I never got a reply from them!