Strand Theatre

510 W. Wisconsin Avenue,
Milwaukee, WI 53201

Unfavorite 1 person favorited this theater

Showing 11 comments

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on August 23, 2013 at 5:12 pm

Many thanks, Chief Jensen, and God bless America!

Ret. AKC (NAC) CCC Bob Jensen, Manteno, Illinois
Ret. AKC (NAC) CCC Bob Jensen, Manteno, Illinois on August 22, 2013 at 2:25 pm

Tinseltoes, that would be off topic, but since you ask, but when you ask a sailor, it could end up a long sea story!

Navy folks have always know what those initials meant and all others as my mother used to say to me “that’s to make little boys ask questions”. I joined the United States Navy in 1962 and retired in 2002. I miss it, but I can’t say my wife does. I was always involved in aviation. You know the Navy has airplanes?

Watch for the capital letters.

Aviation storeKeeper Chief (Naval Air crewmaN) Command Career Counselor

The counselor part was to try and help sailors get promoted so they would stay in the Navy, easy to say, hard to do. For the aircrew, I was loadmaster and had way over 1000 hours flying in the C9B Skytrain II, the Navy version of Douglas/McDonnell Douglas DC9-33RC. Later MD-80, MD-90, Boeing 717. It had a big cargo door so it could be loaded with 7 Air Force pallets of cargo or it could carry 110 passengers. Chiefs are the highest enlisted rate in the Navy. “The Chiefs run the Navy!” Who would know more about the Navy, an officer just out of college or an old salty Chief who has been around forever? I would have been called Chief Jensen or more often just Chief, or if they were talking about me, The Chief.

I flew as far to the West as Okinawa and as far to the East as Spain and all over in between. Getting back to Cinema Treasures, I regret I didn’t pay more attention to the cinemas in my world travels. For example, when will I ever get a chance to again check out the movie theater at the now closed U.S. Naval Air Facility Midway Island out in the middle of Pacific Ocean and it would be nice to see those Gooney Birds again!

Old sailors never die, they just get a little dingy!

The Chief!

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on August 21, 2013 at 3:18 pm

Bob, could you please explain all those initials preceding your name? Are you perhaps retired from distinguished service in the military or government? I’m sure that I’m not the only member who’s been wondering.

Ret. AKC (NAC) CCC Bob Jensen, Manteno, Illinois
Ret. AKC (NAC) CCC Bob Jensen, Manteno, Illinois on August 21, 2013 at 1:14 pm

The original Wangerin Pipe Organ in the Strand was made by the Wangerin Organ Company, 112-124 South Burrell Street, Milwaukee, just a bit over 5 miles South from the theatre. They had another factory Southeast around the corner .2 miles at 117-121 South Austin Street and by World War II had a factory less than 2 miles North at 2330 South Burrell Street. Founded in 1895, they made over 1,000 mostly church organs. During the theater organ boom in the 1920’s the Barton Organ Company of Oshkosh Wisconsin could not keep up with production demand. Wangerin stepped in to assist Barton and provided space as a second manufacturing facility during those years. They made wood parts for aeroplanes during World War I and in World War II made things that had been made of metal so metal could be used for defense.

A Golden Voiced Barton Theater Pipe Organ, 2/6, manual/rank, keyboard/set of pipes, was shipped from the Barton Organ Company in Oshkosh, Wisconsin or perhaps the Wangerin Organ Company in Milwaukee to the Strand, in 1926.

Anyone know what happened to either the Wangerin or Barton organs?

1chinatown
1chinatown on October 19, 2012 at 4:39 am

It was 1959. I was in 7th grade, St. Aloysius in West Allis. The nuns took us to see “Ben Hur”. I will never forget when they opened the drapes ( remember those days). The screen was crimped on both ends as that was the only way it could be fitted. Yes, it was not a Cinerama production, but stunning just the same. It is a shame that this cannot be duplicated today. The chariot race was breathtaking.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on July 4, 2012 at 3:53 pm

Description of 1949 modernization: boxofficemagazine

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca on March 5, 2011 at 11:33 am

Newspaper ad for opening of Tol'able David in January 1922.

kucharsk
kucharsk on January 13, 2008 at 1:15 pm

I have amazing memories of The Strand in the mid 1970s as, as a child, my parents took me there to show me what widescreen films were REALLY all about.

The Strand was doing a run of Todd-AO and 70 mm films, and as a result I got to see Sound of Music, South Pacific, and It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World the way they were MEANT to be seen.

The two memories I will never forget are seeing the pre-intermission montage of Mad World and the wedding scene of Sound of Music on THAT screen.

Those showings at The Strand were solely responsible for my life-long love of large widescreen film processes.

Those experiences simply can never be recreated except at one of the very, very few film palaces left.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on August 10, 2006 at 10:56 pm

Here is a photo from the Milwaukee Public Library. The Strand is on the left side, and the Palace/Orpheum is on the right:
http://tinyurl.com/pwhn2

Hal
Hal on March 1, 2006 at 12:59 pm

Back in the early 70’s, I was on loan from IATSE Local 251 in Madison to Local 164 in Milwaukee and worked at the Strand. It was equipped with a pair of Norelco AA11’s with Strong Carbon Arcs. By the time I got there it was pretty run down, running mostly junk film, we did run The Sound of Music in 70mm during one holiday season, a new print too! In it’s heyday it was THE roadshow house in Milwaukee, the 1st 70mm was Oklahoma and it ran virtually all the big ones after that. I saw Music there as a kid, fond memories indeed!

JimRankin
JimRankin on October 9, 2004 at 1:18 pm

Please let me know if you learn anything more about this theatre.
Jim Rankin