Loew's Jersey Theatre

54 Journal Square,
Jersey City, NJ 07306

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Showing 226 - 250 of 1,405 comments

Ziggy
Ziggy on April 21, 2010 at 6:49 pm

I agree about the christmas lights. There’s this magnificent room, with these cheap tacky lights strung along the railings. It’s sort of demeaning.

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on April 21, 2010 at 5:54 pm

It may be against policy but it is pretty cool.I notice that this has been done on several sites.

HowardBHaas
HowardBHaas on April 21, 2010 at 5:45 pm

You keep saying that, but just like the Loew’s Jersey in person, they are such beautiful photos! I’m certainly not going to drop the dime to Ross….

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on April 21, 2010 at 1:01 pm

Come Friday, I’ll be running Friday’s show.

markp
markp on April 21, 2010 at 9:19 am

If only I wasn’t working 13 hours this Saturday, I would be there to see one of my all time favorite movies, “The Graduate” which I first saw in a movie theatre at age 13 in July 1972. I would have also been able to finally meet Mitchell and the gang.

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on April 21, 2010 at 7:47 am

This coming weekend of April 23rd and 24th, The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre located on Journal Square in Jersey City, New Jersey, continues its 80th Birthday Jubilee and 10th consecutive year of classic films. This season, we are saluting the decades that the Landmark Loews Jersey has been entertaining us. This month, we will be presenting some great classic films from the 1960’s.

Located directly across from the PATH subway station connecting Manhattan with Jersey City, it is also easy to reach from most area highways. Secure discounted parking is located directly behind the theatre. Have your parking ticket validated at the theatre’s boxoffice.

All Show Are Presented In 35mm With Genuine Carbon Arc Projection On Our Giant 50 Foot Wide Screen.

Friday April 23rd at 8:00pm â€" To Kill A Mockingbird (1962)

Starring Gregory Peck, Mary Badham, Philip Alford, Robert Duvall.
Directed by Robert Mulligan. Music by Elmer Bernstein.
(129mins., B&W.)

A wonderful story of a precocious young tomboy and her brother being raised in rural Georgia of the 1930s by their widowed and highly principled father who, as an attorney, takes on the then-impossible mission of defending a black man accused of raping a white woman. Based on the semi-autobiographical novel by Harper Lee, the movie melds the routines, small triumphs and travails of children growing up with the harsh reality of segregation and prejudice. Lee’s work has become a rite of passage for generations of school children. The movie is among the most successfully realized film interpretations of a novel ever made, and one of the most quietly affecting works ever shown on the screen — comedic, dramatic, insightful, tragic, uplifting — and thoroughly engrossing. Gregory Peck won the Academy Award for Best Actor.

Saturday April 24th at 6:00pm â€" A Hard Days Night (1964)

Starring The Beatles, Wilfrid Brambell, Norman Rossington.
Directed by Richard Lester.
(85min., B&W.)

The wild, all-encompassing popularity of The Beatles that exploded across America in late 1963 and ‘64 changed virtually everything about music and pop culture. A Hard Day’s Night was a first attempt to channel some of The Beatles’ popularity toward movie theatre box offices. Remarkably, though the production was decidedly rushed, Director Lester and screenwriter Alun Owen created a musical-comedy-fantasy that managed to perfectly capture the good-naturedly sardonic personas of each of The Beatles while fairly accurately depicting the manic zaniness of the early Beatlemania. The Beatles themselves were very pleased with the results. Of course, the soundtrack rings with some of the Fab Four’s most popular early songs, including “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “And I Love Her,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and the title tune, which was reportedly written overnight by John Lennon and Paul McCartney in response to a plea from the director for a song to match the movie’s title.

Saturday April 24th at 8:15pm â€" The Graduate (1967)

Starring Anne Bancroft, Dustin Hoffman, Katharine Ross.
Directed by Mike Nichols.
(105mins., Color & Panavision)

This is one of a handful of films that managed to speak directly to the baby-boom generation as it was coming of age, and as such contributed several very notable references to our collective popular culture — including the line that summed up the future in one word — “plastic.” But more than forty years after it was made, the movie remains as poignant and funny as ever — greatly entertaining to audiences that came before and after the boomers. In his first major film role, Dustin Hoffman plays a very naive college graduate who is seduced by a middle-aged woman, and then falls in love with her daughter. Contributing immeasurably to the success of the film is the score, much of which was provided by the legendary folk-rock team of Simon and Garfunkel. Their song “Mrs. Robinson,” which refers to Anne Bancroft’s character, is one of the most familiar pieces of the decade, was first heard (in an abbreviated form) in this movie.

Visit The Landmark Loews Jersey web site for details.

[size=1]The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre[/size]

YMike
YMike on April 15, 2010 at 10:51 am

Why not screen some Vitaphone shorts using that projector?

RobMinichino
RobMinichino on April 11, 2010 at 6:33 pm

We currently project films from Norelco FP-20 projectors which are not capable of playing back Vitaphone sound-on-disc, but which are indeed equipped with modern red-light reverse scan sound readers.

We do have the capability to play back Vitaphone sound through another projector, however. This projector consists of a Simplex Standard projector head mounted on a Western Electric Universal Base, which has a motor to drive the actual projector head, the film take-up assembly, an optical sound head to play back sound-on-film, and the turntable assembly to play back sound-on-disc. The Simplex Standard projector head was introduced in the silent days, and the Universal Base adapts it for sound. However, as we only have one of these projectors, we are not able to seamlessly show Vitaphone films over 20 minutes in duration.

Although this equipment was removed long ago, this configuration is the same as was originally installed in the Loew’s Jersey in 1929. However, this is not the same equipment.

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on April 11, 2010 at 6:31 pm

If you scroll up to November 15th, you can see a picture of the Vitaphone projector. The picture head is a Simplex Standard with a front of the lens shutter. The sound is a Western Electric optical sound gate (not a sound drum), still with it’s original white light exciter lamp. There is a switch to switch over to the disc sound. Vitaphone discs play at 33 1/3 from the center outward. The projector works, but at the moment is disconnected and moved out of the way to make room for the 70mm Norelco AA that is being installed. The Vitaphone projector was never used for regular screenings. For regular screenings, we use Kinoton FP-20’s.

itswagon
itswagon on April 11, 2010 at 5:58 pm

I am curious as to who made the vitaphone projectors? The Vitaphone system originally employed a record player that was connected mechanically to the projector for sound. I am sure the Vitaphone projectors in the Jersey have a cyan layer exciter and pickup. I’d appreciate any information on the booth at the Jersey. Thank you.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on March 29, 2010 at 8:47 pm

I’d still like to know how to display the pictures (I don'think they’re actually embedded) and I’ll take my chances.

RobMinichino
RobMinichino on March 29, 2010 at 7:02 pm

In reference to the comments about air conditioning, the Loew’s Jersey did have an air conditioning system, but it is far beyond repair and has not functioned at least since the building closed in 1986.

We are currently in the design process for a new air conditioning system, but there is some uncertainty with the funding, so I can’t say when the installation will be finished. Some preparatory work has already begun.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on March 22, 2010 at 9:47 am

Hi MBD — could you explain again how you get a photo to show up right in the posting? (You may email me if you don’t care to post to the group.)

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on March 22, 2010 at 9:34 am

This coming weekend of March 26th and 27th, The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre located on Journal Square in Jersey City, New Jersey, continues its 80th Birthday Jubilee and 10th consecutive year of classic films. This season, we are saluting the decades that the Landmark Loews Jersey has been entertaining us. This month, we will be presenting some classic films from the 1950’s.

Located directly across from the PATH subway station connecting Manhattan with Jersey City, it is also easy to reach from most area highways. Secure discounted parking is located directly behind the theatre. Have your parking ticket validated at the theatre’s boxoffice.

All Show Are Presented In 35mm With Genuine Carbon Arc Projection On Our Giant 50 Foot Wide Screen.

Friday March 26th at 8:00pm â€" Night Of The Hunter (1955)

Starring Robert Mitchum, Shelley Winters, Lillian Gish. Directed by Charles Laughton
(93mins. B&W)

Robert Mitchum gives one of his greatest performances as a psychotic, misogynistic and phony preacher who insinuates himself into the family of an executed man with whom he had been imprisoned in order to find the hoard of cash the man had hidden away. All that stands between the brutal Mitchum and the money are the other man’s two young children and the indomitable, scripture-quoting old woman, played magnificently by Lillian Gish, to whom the children turn for help. Gish’s faith, courage and compassion are set in breathtakingly stark contrast against Mitchum’s dark, venal perversity â€" creating one of the screen’s most memorable and successful parables of good vs. evil.

Saturday March 27th at 6:15pm â€" King Creole (1958)

Starring Elvis Presley, Walter Matthau, Carolyn Jones, Dolores Hart. Directed by Michael Curtiz.
(115mins. B&W)

In King Creole Elvis Presley displays an acting ability that was only hinted at in many of his later films, giving an entertaining and compelling performance as a young man trying to find himself while finding his way between good and bad choices. Presley plays a high school drop-out working to help support his unemployed father when he falls in with a gang of teenage toughs. But since he can sing, and the owner of a struggling nightclub gives him a chance to go straight and perhaps even make it big. Yet he soon finds himself being pulled into the corrupt world of a local mob boss who runs a successful nightclub and wants Presley to work for him. Presley also has to make a choice between his true love and the good-girl-gone-wrong moll of the mob boss. The film is greatly aided by good performances from Walter Matthau, who plays a very effective heavy as the mob boss, and a pre-“Addams Family” Carolyn Jones as his reluctant moll.

Saturday March 27th at 8:30pm â€" On The Waterfront (1954)

Starring Marlon Brando, Karl Malden, Lee J. Cobb, Rod Steiger, Eva Marie Saint, Martin Balsam.
Directed by Elia Kazan. Written by Bud Schulberg.
(107mins. B&W)

“On the Waterfront” is one of the most powerful narratives ever filmed is due in no small part to the uncanny sense of truth it projects from first frame to last. And this, in turn, is largely due to the remarkable performances of its cast â€" from Marlon Brando’s extraordinary creation of Malloy, to the smallest nuances of the supporting players. That the movie was famously filmed on location on the real waterfront in Hoboken, N.J. greatly adds to this aura of truth by imparting an authenticity and immediacy that has never been equaled in any other major motion picture: the gritty, violent and strangely claustrophobic world it depicted was no set, but life itself. Leonard Bernstein’s score imparts a very subtle operatic quality to the otherwise hyper-realistic film. The film is an extraordinary mix of coarse and refined elements â€" harsh realism and elegant art fused into a coherent and compelling whole.

“On the Waterfront” won Oscars for Best Picture, Best Director for Elia Kazan, Best Adapted Screenplay for Budd Schulberg, Best Actor for Brando, Best Supporting Actress for Saint, Best Cinematography, Best Art Direction, and Best Editing. Fifty-six years later, it remains an extraordinary cinematic accomplishment. Don’t miss this chance to see it back on the big screen.

Visit The Landmark Loews Jersey web site for details.

[size=1]The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre[/size]

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on March 18, 2010 at 2:04 pm

Maybe they should book a fetish film festival next to take advantage of the area’s un-natural resources.

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on March 18, 2010 at 11:05 am

This weekend March 19th thru 21st, The Landmark Loews Jersey in Jersey City New Jersey is hosting a three days of horror-related guests, screenings, vendors.

Convention to include 35MM-film screenings of Night of the Living Dead and Creepshow.

Celebrity guests include George A. Romero, Ken Foree, Adrienne Barbeau, Tom Savini, David Emge, Kyra Schon & more!

The show is a rental, for more information visit the promoter’s web site Saturday Nightmares

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on March 16, 2010 at 11:41 am

It has air conditioning. It’s just not working.

YMike
YMike on March 16, 2010 at 11:03 am

That is true. That is why no events are scheduled in July & August at the Loews.

PeterApruzzese
PeterApruzzese on March 16, 2010 at 9:21 am

As far as I know, there is no air conditioning at the Jersey.

Life's Too Short
Life's Too Short on March 16, 2010 at 8:32 am

Does the Loews Jersey have air-conditioning?

Bway
Bway on March 15, 2010 at 7:33 pm

Kyle, I can only imagine how wonderful the sound is.
By the way, the Geico Commercial of a guy playing a fiddle in a large ornate room (which appears to be a fancy restaurant in the commercial) is actually the Loews Jersey, in I believe the lobby. It’s beautiful. You can find the video on youtube.

theauteur
theauteur on March 15, 2010 at 4:22 pm

I had the pleasure of volunteering at the Loew’s this past summer. If I lived any closer, I’d be down there every weekend helping them out. They are in the process of installing there new 70mm projectors…unsure of the make. I helped with scraping the scum of chair arms so that they can all be put back together and increase the seating capacity of this movie palace. I have been to a few shows over the past two years and they have been grand/epic. Rob Minichino, the technical director and projectionist at the Loew’s allowed me to record sound at the Jersey City Loew’s back in October of 2009, when they had a silent film playing with the Wonder Morton. The ambient sound that echoes throughout the building and ducts of the building create this hauntingly beautiful sound.

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on February 26, 2010 at 9:40 am

Wish Icould be there this weekend to catch the flicks.Good to see it still going.Now of they get the LOEWS KINGS back up and running by 2014 as reported.

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on February 22, 2010 at 9:36 am

This coming weekend of February 26th and 27th, The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre located on Journal Square in Jersey City, New Jersey, continues its 80th Birthday Jubilee and 10th consecutive year of classic films. This season, we are saluting the decades that the Landmark Loews Jersey has been entertaining us. This month, we will be presenting some classic films from the 1940’s.

Located directly across from the PATH subway station connecting Manhattan with Jersey City, it is also easy to reach from most area highways. Secure discounted parking is located directly behind the theatre. Have your parking ticket validated at the theatre’s boxoffice.

All Show Are Presented In 35mm With Genuine Carbon Arc Projection On Our Giant 50 Foot Wide Screen.

Friday February 26th at 8:00pm â€" White Heat (1949)

Starring James Cagney, Virginia Mayo, Edmond O'Brien.
Directed by Raoul Walsh. (114 minutes, B&W)

James Cagney first became a star in the 1930s as a tough criminal in Warner Bros. Studio’s classic gangster melodramas. He went on, of course, to play a great variety of other roles, ranging from George M. Cohan to the great silent star Lon Chaney, Sr., in dramas, musicals and comedies. But in 1949, Cagney returned one last time to the role of tough guy in “White Heat” â€" a crime drama that takes the familiar elements of plot, character and theme from his old ‘30s gangster pictures but transforms them into a kind of Film Noir tragedy. Cagney is Cody Jarrett, a deranged criminal prone to headaches and seizures. His molten temper, feral cunning and mercurial charm are finely calibrated extensions of the doomed gangsters Cagney played a decade before, this time coiled not around a Depression-era impetus of greed or class rivalry, but an Oedipal bond. Cody’s beloved, calculating “Ma” (Margaret Wycherly) is the compass for his every move, her iron will and long shadow acknowledged not only by Cody but by his gang, his restless wife (Virginia Mayo, radiating sensuality and guile), and the undercover cop (Edmond O'Brien) planted in Jarrett’s path. Cagney’s performance is nothing less than superb as he creates one of the most frighteningly psychotic characters ever seen on screen, a model for the stranger, more brutal outlaws who would dominate crime cinema in the 1960s and 1970s. The fiery, climactic scene has become part of pop culture.

Saturday February 27th at 6:15pm â€" Notorious (1946)

Starring Ingrid Bergman, Cary Grant, Claude Rains.
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. (101 minutes, B&W)

“Notorious” is a tightly woven and brilliantly sustained mix of romance and suspense that takes remarkable risks with its main characters. Ingrid Bergman, never more radiant or vulnerable, is a flawed heroine: the beautiful daughter of a Nazi spy who’s garnered a notorious reputation for herself by turning to drink and casual affairs to help forget the shame of her father’s infamy. Cary Grant, whose suave screen persona was rarely more hard-edged and even unlikable, is an American agent who uses Bergman’s affection for him to manipulate her into spying on her father’s old Nazi cronies. And Claude Rains is an unlikely villain: a charming Nazi sympathizer who genuinely loves Bergman and seems far more likable than Grant. To this mix, Hitchcock adds some of his most stunning black and white camera work, including a famous tracking shot that begins across a crowded room and ends in a close-up of Bergman’s hand while she secretly holds a key. Several scenes are unusually but very effectively shown from Bergman’s point of view. Throughout the script, written by legendary screenwriter Ben Hecht, there is the troubling subtext of love and betrayal. Notorious is one of the most effective Noir, or at least Noir-ish films, and is often considered to be Hitchcock’s finest film of the 1940s.

Saturday February 27th at 8:30pm â€" The Third Man (1949)

Starring Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Alida Valli, Trevor Howard.
Directed by Carl Reed. Written by Graham Green. (104 minutes, B&W)

One of the greatest Noir movies ever filmed, “The Third Man” sets loyalty, friendship and love against justice and common good in the fractured, cynical setting of defeated and occupied Vienna after World War II. Joseph Cotten is Holly Martins, an alcoholic pulp writer from America who’s traveled to Austria to visit his old friend Harry Lime (Orson Welles). But when Martins arrives, Lime’s funeral is under way. From Lime’s girlfriend and an occupying British officer Martins learns of allegations of Lime’s involvement in black market racketeering. The idealistic and perhaps naïve Martins vows to clear his friend’s reputation. But as he is drawn deeper into postwar intrigue, Martins finds layer upon layer of deception which he desperately tries to sort out. One of the most remarkable aspects of The Third Man is that Welles is only in the last third of the film, yet seems to dominate it throughout. This is a tribute to how cleverly screenwriter Graham Greene builds anticipation through the contradictory information Martins gathers in his search for info about his old friend. It’s also a tribute to how powerful and widely known Welles’ screen persona is. Welles’ long-delayed entrance is one of the most memorable scenes in any film. The movie boasts some of the most evocative cinematography ever filmed, with long shadows, stark lighting, cocked camera angles and exaggerated close-ups that perfectly capture the surreal, off-kilter feel of postwar Europe as well as emphasize the shadowy nature of the story. The zither music that plays throughout is among the most recognized and haunting movie themes.

Visit The Landmark Loews Jersey web site for details.

[size=1]The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre[/size]