Loew's Paradise Theatre

2413 Grand Concourse,
Bronx, NY 10468

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Showing 301 - 325 of 765 comments

rlvjr
rlvjr on July 22, 2006 at 8:22 am

THE TIME IS NOW! I found tickets for the Paradide listed on the TickerMaster site for “Night in Paradise” on September 30th. It says it’s a night of classic r&b music. Several Black groups. Well, OK, I’m white but I’ve seen many shows at Washington DC’s Howard Theatre, Washington’s equivalent of Harlem’s Apollo. Black people speak English, likewise sing in English. That’s all I ask. Before rap they made good music, many still do. Tickets are $75, 65, 55 or 45. Pretty steep, but so what? I’ll be there —– in Row A. What about you?

ThePhotoplayer
ThePhotoplayer on July 20, 2006 at 6:27 am

Frankly, a venue that size in NYC costs less to keep closed and rented out for catering and such than it does to run it for concerts (throwing on EVERY light in the house).

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on July 19, 2006 at 12:05 am

The “capital improvements” are probably why there are no presentations until September 30th. Also, there might be problems with air-conditioning. Does the Paradise even have it? And the cost of running it would be extremely expensive. The system has to be turned on many hours in advance of a performance to cool down such a large auditiorium and its surrounding areas.

Life's Too Short
Life's Too Short on July 18, 2006 at 4:28 pm

Well, there has been some discussion of this in the past. It seems like every event is certainly not listed on that web site.

Altoblanco
Altoblanco on July 18, 2006 at 4:14 pm

No shows scheduled until September 30th (a soul music concert)? I am very surprised at the lack of bookings – theater management will have to do better than this if they want to recoup their investment and cover operating expenses – I doubt that their food-beverage services and rented retail spaces generate enough income to support such a large space. So unless they are renting it out every week for private parties, corporate functions or catered events, I can’t see how they manage to survive.

Let’s hope this “dry spell” is temporary.

At least they are making capital improvements with the funds that they have. Those high-efficiency light bulbs will pay for themselves in energy savings and relamping costs, as they will last up to 10 times (about 9000 hours) longer than old-fashioned incandescent “Edison lamps” and require less-frequent replacement. Only problem is: can they be dimmed? (I assume they are compact fluorescent and/or LED lamps – these require special ballasts and circuits for dimming – this equipment, along with installation costs, is very expensive).

Also, don’t they hire union electricians for this type of work? Their labor rates can be outrageous.

Finally, a good point was made regarding movie presentations – didn’t they remove projection capabilities (rooms and equipment) when they modified the theater for live performances?

njmoviefan
njmoviefan on July 17, 2006 at 1:13 am

Rabbit:

Thanks for getting the follow-up.

Interesting that Orlando’s reply talks about replacing light bulbs and nothing about the installation/specifications of the film projection gear they are going to have.

JimRankin
JimRankin on July 17, 2006 at 1:04 am

Ah, to replace all light bulbs! Consider: in the 1920s a light bulb cost 2 cents, the electric rate was about ½ cent per kilowat hour, and bulb replacement labor was around 30 cents or less the hour; now we have nearly a dollar per standard bulb, around 8 cents per kilowat hour, and probably $15 per hour labor. It is a miracle that they found the thousands needed to pay for all that work! Few of us ever get to see a movie palace’s thousands of bulbs fully lit for just these reasons! I dearly hope someone takes photos of the newly illuminated space before about 700 hours pass and most of the bulbs are again burned out without again the money to replace them.

I also hope that the contractor will be careful of the fragile items: paint, plaster and textiles which can easily be damaged by rough fellows on the hurry-up, which all contractors are in order to make the most money. This is why I prefer volunteers if possible to do relamping; presumably they care. Such a theatre is just too precious a learning experience for a contractor who is there one day with his minimum wage crew, and gone the next! Let us hope that the owner keeps at least one ‘clerk-of-the-works’ on site at ALL times to keep the contractor and crews considerate of the building, and right there with a camera to document any damage they do. It would be good to let it leak that there are hidden security cameras in the attic and all areas to monitor all doings!

Life's Too Short
Life's Too Short on July 16, 2006 at 10:28 am

Very cool! It certainly sounds like they are doing things right.

rabbitlaz
rabbitlaz on July 16, 2006 at 10:08 am

I sent an e-mail to Orlando regarding the films. The follwing is his reply…The film series has been delayed until mid to late September. “West Side Story” is still the opening film and a “star appearance” and several “Jets” will be on hand. The theatre is being relamped by a Con Edison contractor and only up to now was 1/3 lit. They will be responsible for replacing the 2/3 bulb outages in the proscenium arch. The vestibule, foyers and grand lobby were done when I taped a BNET television special Thursday to air this October, and the new energysaving bulbs throw off a new glow to the building. Coves were only barely lit as were the chadeliers and wall fixtures. Orchestra blue backlighting is completely out as is the organ grills, the proscenium arch cove ( 1 bulb out of forty working ). The bridge and the center statue will also be lit as well as some overlooked places. I was glad to be there with the contractors who have done several other theatres.

njmoviefan
njmoviefan on July 13, 2006 at 5:40 am

Still no news about the scheduled movie of West Side Story on July 21?

I would have to guess it’s not happening – what gives, Orlando?

mlkaufman
mlkaufman on July 9, 2006 at 9:43 am

The Paradise gave it to the Jersey City when it appeared doubtful that the Paradise would ever use it again.

ShortyC
ShortyC on July 9, 2006 at 1:36 am

I have a question, according to the friends of Loews website (group who is restoring the Jersey theatre) they said the organ that is now in the Jersey thatre is from the Paradise theatre, how come the paradise doesn’t have their original organ?

njmoviefan
njmoviefan on July 8, 2006 at 1:31 pm

Less than two weeks to go – any word on the planned showing of West Side Story on July 21?

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on July 1, 2006 at 1:49 am

In May, 1947, the Paradise lost its exclusive status for the Bronx during the city-wide premiere engagement of Selznick’s “Duel in the Sun.” The movie opened simultaneously in the Bronx at Loew’s Boulevard, American, 167th Street, National, Fairmount, and Post Road: www.i8.photobucket.com/albums/a18/Warrengwhiz/duelsun47.jpg

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on June 21, 2006 at 8:00 am

I believe the Paradise might have first opened as a quartet on December 12th, 1980. Stop the presses! (ha ha) Anyway, I have several newspapers from around this time (following John Lennon’s death) and curiously find that in the Thursday, December 11th edition, there are listings in the Movie Clock for only Paradise 1 and Paradise 2 (respectively showing “The Elephant Man” and “Boogie Man”). The ad for “Elephant Man” as well as the ads for “Popeye” and “Stir Crazy” (opening the following day) list the theater as “Loews Paradise Triplex”:
Elephant/Popeye NY Post 12/11/80
Stir Crazy – NY Post 12/11/80

All the ads in the next day’s paper (Friday the 12th) list the theater as “Loews Paradise Quad” with the Movie Clock listing “Stir Crazy” in theaters 1 and 2 while “Popeye” and “Elephant Man” played 3 and 4 respectively.
Stir Crazy – News 12/12/80
Popeye – News 12/12/80
Elephant Man – News 12/12/80

My guess is the theater operated only the two downstairs theaters up through December 11th, while the balcony theater was being divided in two for the December 12th bookings. Just throwing it out there.

Bway
Bway on June 19, 2006 at 3:49 am

It’s almost a sin that a theater with the status of this one, being among one of the “Wonder Theaters” doesn’t even have an opening paragraph or two as a description. Perhaps someone should submit something?

LuisV
LuisV on June 19, 2006 at 3:14 am

I also totally disagree that it is unsavable. I’ve seen photos of the old New Amsterdam theater on 42nd St. which was partially open to the sky. That truly appeared to be unsavalbe. Yet it was saved! through a combination of city initiative (The 42nd St. Business Improvement District)and private industry (Disney). The same could be done in Brooklyn! I know that Brooklyn is not Manhattan, but it isn’t East St. Louis either. Much can be done here.

The borough President talks about the King’s being a passion of his. Let’s see him put some money where his mouth is! Give the King’s a grant to at least stabilize the building and jump start the rebuilding process.

The Kings can be saved, should be saved and will be saved!

Bway
Bway on June 18, 2006 at 10:04 pm

Unsavable? That’s a little extreme. Why would you say “unsavabe”. Obviously, the theatre needs a tremendous amount of work, but after view it, I wouldn’t say “unsavable”. Take the RKO Keith’s Flushing, and I’ll agree, “that’s unsavable”. But I don’t believe the Kings is unsavable.

ThePhotoplayer
ThePhotoplayer on June 18, 2006 at 2:42 pm

Millions of dollars. The Paradise and the 175th are THE last fully-preserved Wonder Theatres.

The A&E documentary was shot by professionals who could make a nuclear dump look good. Seeing the Kings on TV and seeing it in person are two different things. At this point, it is unsavable.

ShortyC
ShortyC on June 18, 2006 at 1:21 pm

I am happy to see that at least one of the Wonder theatres is still on and will never be demolished. And well obviously Jersey is there too. I hope that they can do this to Kings but so far the theatre is dead. How much did it cost for Paradise’s restoration?

LuisV
LuisV on June 18, 2006 at 11:53 am

I thoroughly enjoyed the A&E special but was left wanting more. Much More!!!!! The theaters are incredibly special and represent an architectural legacy that will never be duplicated. That all five of these theaters still exist is a miracle, but this show could easily have done a hour or more devoted to their history and current states of condition. It was truly uplifting to see what has been done by voulnteers to rescue the Jersey. Why can’t the same be done for the Kings! It is already owned by the city. The borough presidents office could easily earmark discretionary funds to jumpstart this project and Brooklyn corporate sponsors could be enlisted as well. I was disappointed that we saw virtually none of the 175th St. theater in this special.

I also was surprised that they didn’t devote more to the Paradise since it has just been reopened. I wanted to see more of the architectual details. I am taping the Daddy Yankee concert to see if I can see more details there!

Maybe I would never have been satified no matter how much they showed! :–)

I was great to see these theaters given the attention they desparately need if we are to preserve them for future generations.

Altoblanco
Altoblanco on June 18, 2006 at 11:44 am

I am watching the MTV2 concert event as I write this – great opening shots of the crowds and the theater’s interior statuary and ornamentation – what fun! And what a gorgeous performance space!

I have limited understanding of what the Spanish lyrics are saying (much of it is slang) – everyone in the crowd is smiling and nobody on stage looks too angry, although I did notice that one of the songs is entitled “Machete”.

Long live the Paradise!

Marcus Loew must be turning over in his grave.

njmoviefan
njmoviefan on June 18, 2006 at 11:15 am

How are the plans for classic film shows progressing? (as noted in the April 20 posting).

Altoblanco
Altoblanco on June 13, 2006 at 4:05 am

Attention Paradise Theatre aficionados:

A RARE opportunity to enjoy a glimpse of this magnificent theatre TWICE in ONE DAY!

On Sunday, June 18th, TWO television shows will be featuring this theatre in all of its glory…

8:00 a.m. EDT
A&E Television â€" “Breakfast with the Arts” series presents…
“WONDER THEATRES” (documentary)

8:00 p.m. EDT
MTV2 â€" “$2 Bill Concert Series” presents…
“DADDY YANKEE AND FRIENDS” (June 5th show at the Paradise Theatre)

Enjoy!

Altoblanco
Altoblanco on June 11, 2006 at 6:47 am

I’m glad that the theatre is “intact” and experienced no major problems (I did not see anything reported in the local news media, so I suppose that “no news is good news”). I’m even more pleased to hear that the theatre is capable of attracting a diverse crowd despite its particular location in the Bronx â€" it sounds like it has a broad appeal that goes beyond just the ”locals”, and its convenient proximity to mass transit is a definite “selling point” and key to its success (especially for MTV2 and its audience alike, and appropriate considering this particular concert series’ theme).

Given all of this and the extra security measures in place, the Paradise should be a “safe bet” as a major destination for many more enthusiastic concertgoers. I’ll be looking forward to seeing more events like this scheduled there. Congratulations and best wishes to Paradise Theatre management â€" a very smart programming decision!

I would have actually liked to see this show live, but couldn’t since I already had a prior obligation (a college class) â€" a Monday night seems like a strange time to schedule a concert event (they probably figured that they would get a huge crowd regardless of day and time). I’ll just have to catch it on TV.