Fremont Theatre

1025 Monterey Street,
San Luis Obispo, CA 93406

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Showing 26 - 50 of 56 comments

tabascoman77
tabascoman77 on September 8, 2007 at 7:04 pm

One of my top ten favorite theaters of all-time.

I lived in San Luis for two years and I caught many a show here, my most favorite screening being “The Fifth Element”, a GREAT movie to see on a screen like this with beautiful sound.

Downside: the cheap owner either has no A/C and won’t pony up the cash for it or he won’t turn it on. The theater gets VERY warm, especially in the summer. Of course, I haven’t been there in about ten years, so perhaps, it’s changed. Anybody know?

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on August 26, 2007 at 8:43 am

Another recent night view of the Fremont Theater can be seen here.

studiobrian
studiobrian on August 25, 2007 at 11:35 pm

Here is a night image of the Fremont Theater.

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on August 23, 2007 at 4:37 pm

This is a more recent photo of the Fremont Theater.

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on August 15, 2007 at 4:59 pm

Here is another photo of the Fremont Theater.

rlgoldst2
rlgoldst2 on August 12, 2007 at 9:27 am

During a recent visit to the SLO area, 3 generations of my family enjoyed “The Simpsons” movie at a Wednesday matinee. It was a delightful experience. The ambience, interior design, projection, sound, and seat comfort were of a high quality rarely found in these days of chopped-up multiplexes. I almost felt transported back to the ‘50s. The Fremont is an example of how to keep intact a large movie house. Long may it last.

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on April 22, 2007 at 1:25 pm

This is another 2007 night view of the Fremont Theater.

bonnach
bonnach on January 27, 2007 at 4:24 am

Here’s a nice shot of the front of the marquee at night. View link

bonnach
bonnach on January 26, 2007 at 6:14 pm

In 1996 the newly re-united rock group Yes performed 3 nights in the Fremont. You can see the concert, and the theater, on their Keys to Ascension DVD. Not exactly the best concert film I’ve ever seen, though they played excellently. Just horribly and annoyingly edited. The concerts also spawned two 2 disc live cds as well.

bonnach
bonnach on January 26, 2007 at 6:02 pm

On page 63 of the same book.
“Inside this 1,060 seat theater, 100 foot murals covered the walls. The ceiling held ultraviolet bulbs that created a "black light” effect on the patterned carpet, which was woven with fluorescent thread. When the house lights dimmed and the ultraviolet lights were turned on, the carpet looked like a painting on glass, drawing oohs and aahs from the delighted moviegoers."

That must have been pretty cool! The murals are still there and the ceiling looks amazing despite a little water damage in some spots. I’ll have to check out the carpet next time I go! I think it’s just kind of ordinary though.

bonnach
bonnach on January 26, 2007 at 5:57 pm

continuing with the above…
“When the rally moved to the theater, attractive, uniformed usherettes wearing wide-legged trousers and brass-buttoned jackets showed guests to their seats. The celebrities then took the stage to welcome the crowd. The Memorial Day fundraiser brought in $778,000 in bond pledges, and all theater proceeds went to the local USO. Built in 1941, the Art Deco Streamline Moderne-style Fremont Theater was designed by theater architect Charles Lee.”

bonnach
bonnach on January 26, 2007 at 5:52 pm

Quoting from “Images of America, San Luis Obispo: A History in Architecture” by Janet Penn Franks.
“The 1942 Memorial Day grand opening of the heralded Fremont Theater attracted Hollywood celebrities and local residents who gathered to support our troops, watch stars Tyrone Power and Joan Fontaine in the preview screening of "This Above All”, and celebrate the birth of San Luis Obispo’s “theater of tomorrow.” Opening night was glamorous and exciting – San Luis Obispans crowded the streets, hoping to catch a glimpse of stars like Carol Landis, Constance Bennett, John Carroll, and Charlie Ruggles. The actors and actresses arrived by bus to sell war bonds at a rally that began in from of the courthouse across the street from the Fremnt."

SLOnative
SLOnative on May 29, 2006 at 1:59 pm

The Fremont is currently showing the Da Vinci Code. It opened in 1942, right after the war had started and was used for live shows which sold War Bonds to the public. Mel Venter, a Bay Area morning radio show host came down a couple of times to do live broadcasts of his west coast morning variety show. I still remember him using a local reference on one of his broadcasts—“Monterey Heights”. He asked his drop-dead beautiful girl singer. “Pretty Polly, Have any of the Cal Poly boys (no coeds then) showed you Monterey Heights?” (a famous lover’s lane parking spot that looked out over the city).

SLOnative
SLOnative on May 29, 2006 at 1:57 pm

The Fremont is currently showing the DiVinci Code. It opened in 1942, right after the war had started and was used for live shows which sold War Bonds to the public. Mel Venter, a Bay Area morning radio show host came down a couple of times to do live broadcasts of his west coast morning variety show. I still remember him using a local reference on one of his broadcasts—“Monterey Heights”. He asked his drop-dead beautiful girl singer. “Pretty Polly, Have any of the Cal Poly boys (no coeds then) showed you Monterey Heights?” (a famous lover’s lane parking spot that looked out over the city).

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on March 26, 2006 at 1:12 pm

Here is another night view of the Fremont Theater.

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on March 11, 2006 at 6:12 am

This is a night view of the Fremont theater in San Luis Obispo.

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on March 7, 2006 at 6:41 am

Here is a close up photo of the Fremont Theater.

Evan39
Evan39 on November 12, 2005 at 8:04 am

This is one of the most beautiful theaters in America. Recently when driving through SLO we stopped in downtown so I could take some photos. The Fremont was showing Corpse Bride that Sunday and was open so I walked in and took some interior photos. I told the manager what I was up to and about CT and she was very friendly about it. Unfortunately the auditorium was dark so couldn’t see that part.

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on October 15, 2005 at 7:29 am

This is a larger photo of the Fremont Theater.

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on September 22, 2005 at 10:25 am

Here is another photo of the Fremont Theater.

Harold
Harold on July 20, 2005 at 10:36 am

The Fremont is now operated by The Movie Experience. And stepping into the lobby is an experience. The interior is beautiful. It is in operation as a regular first run theatre – but once a month it screens classic films that are very well attended. A recent screening of “Rebel Without A Cause” brought in over 600 fans. The town really supports this theatre. On the opening night in 1940, among the attending stars were Laurel & Hardy.(The photo hangs in the managers office to this day) This theatre is one of the most photographed and painted buildings in California. A real S. Charles Lee beauty.

buster
buster on July 13, 2005 at 6:21 am

When the Fremont opened my mother took me to my first movie there in my stroller. I grew up in SLO, and I saw most of the movies of my youth at the Fremont, the Obispo (just down the street, now demolished), and the Elmo, long gone, known as the Flea Bag. The Fremont was the queen, full of fact and fantasy for me. For my photograph of it, see View link

raoul88
raoul88 on February 15, 2005 at 1:41 pm

In 1993, Edwards took over the Fremont from Mann Theatres, closed it down for a period and performed a major restoration of its Art Deco interior and gorgeous neon marquee. The Fremont was re-opened on a Thursday night with two screenings of JURASSIC PARK (the night before the movie’s official release), a major event in SLO. Edwards no longer operates the Fremont; twelve years later, I can only hope that the current operators are taking care with Edwards' good work.

hudsony777
hudsony777 on January 6, 2005 at 6:14 am

I remember visiting San Luis Obispo on vacation during the late 80s and marvelling at this beautiful theatre. It’s one of the most charming interiors I’ve seen and I was amazed at the swirling murals on the walls. I’m glad this theatre survives.

Also glad the theatre has a bigger screen, but sorry if it no longer has any curtains, or are they simply smaller? “Manwithoutname” is right though, the way a movie starts is as important as the house it plays in, and is as important as the movie itself. Forget DVDs!

Manwithnoname
Manwithnoname on January 1, 2005 at 9:02 am

I have recently seen photos of the auditorium since the remodel and it seems to make room for the larger screen the impressive curtains I discussed above are now history. I am pleased this theater was not carved up but unfortunately it did not survive intact. Probably the one thing even harder to find than a classic movie house today is showmanship.