Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 76 - 100 of 8,836 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Patee Theatre on Jul 4, 2014 at 12:33 am

Here is an additional photo showing the Patee Theatre around the time of its opening in 1913.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Patee Theatre on Jul 4, 2014 at 12:29 am

The Boxoffice article Tinseltoes linked to says that the Patee Theatre was built in 1903. However, this page from the Watkins Museum of History says that the house opened by Clair and Vivian Patee in 1903 was at 708 Massachusetts Street, and was originally called the Nickel Theatre.

It was in 1913 that they opened the Patee Theatre at 828 Massachusetts Street. The Patee Theatre was gutted by a fire in March, 1955, and the building demolished later that year. The location of the theater’s entrance is now the site of a pedestrian walkway to a parking lot. The original Nickel Theatre building is now a bookshop.

The page has a slide show with photos of both theaters, but they are all just front views.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Princess Theatre on Jul 3, 2014 at 8:14 pm

The Princess Theatre was listed at 834 N. Kansas Avenue in the 1921 Topeka City Directory.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Royal Theater on Jul 3, 2014 at 3:44 pm

The Royal Theatre at Park Rapids, Minnesota, was mentioned in the September 7, 1918, issue of The Moving Picture World.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Stanley Theatre on Jul 3, 2014 at 12:44 pm

This earlier comment by AlAlvarez says that the Stanley was showing movies as early as 1916. Its age, and the fact that it is the only theater listed for this stretch of 7th Avenue, makes it more likely that it was the theater in this item from The American Contractor of July 5, 1913:

“Moving Picture Theater (seating capacity 800): 2 sty. 60x90. $35,000. W. S. Seventh av., nr. 41st st., New York City. Archt. W. H. Hoffman, Empire bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. Const. Engr. Jas. P. Whiskerman, 30 E. 42d st., New York City. Brick. Bldrs. H. P. Wright & Co., 30 E. 42d st., New York City. Excavation finished. Plumbing let to Savoy Plumbing Co., 162 Prince st., New York City.”
W. H. Hoffman was, of course, the senior partner in the Philadelphia architectural firm of Hoffman & Henon, specialists in theater design.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Heights Theater on Jul 2, 2014 at 10:23 pm

They usually are, guarina, but for some reason on Wadsworth Avenue it’s back-asswards.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about De Luxe Theatre on Jul 2, 2014 at 5:20 pm

This item is from the July 5, 1913, issue of The American Contractor:

“Motion Picture Theater: 1 sty. 60 x110. $15,000. 404 S. Orange av. Archt. W. E. Lehman, 738 Broad st. Owner H. C. Schneider (builder), 514 S. 14th st., & Edw. A. Kirch (furniture), Market st. Lessee about to sign lease. Architect & owner receiving bids. Brick, buff Indiana limestone, slag roof, galv. iron skylights, cornice, struct. & orn. iron, N. C. pine & cement flooring, white wood trim, tiling, gas & electric fixtures.”
The De Luxe must have been one of the more modest theaters designed by William E. Lehman.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Central Park Theater on Jul 2, 2014 at 5:00 pm

This item is from the July 5, 1913, issue of The American Contractor:

“Picture Theater: 2 ¼ sty. 100x150. $30,000. Main st. & Fillmore av. Archt. H. P. Kehr, 503 Mutual Life bldg. Owner Buffalo Cement Co., 110 Franklin st. Up to roof. Architect desires bids on interior wood finish, electric work.”
I haven’t been able to find anything else about architect H. P. Kehr.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Royal Theatre on Jul 2, 2014 at 4:31 pm

There is a possibility that the Royal Theatre was a house that had opened in 1918 as the Liberty Theatre. The September 21 issue of The Moving Picture World that year said that “[m]oving picture theatre congestion at Orange, Texas, has been relieved by the opening of the Strand and the Liberty theatres on Front near Sixth street in that city.” 510 W. Front Street would put the Royal near Sixth Street. The upstairs windows of the building in the ca.1948 photo CSWalczak linked to are of an old style typical of the 1910s but pretty much obsolete for commercial construction by 1940. However, the Liberty was supposed to have had about 1,100 seats, so if it was the same house as the Royal there was quite a discrepancy to account for.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theatre on Jul 2, 2014 at 4:04 pm

This notice appeared in the September 7, 1918, issue of The Moving Picture World:

“Herschel Thomas' Strand Theatre at Orange, Texas, opened August 28 with Rex Beach’s ‘Heart of the Sunset.’ This theatre cost $70,000.”
A somewhat belated item in the September 21 issue of the same publication revealed that Orange also had theaters called the Liberty and the Princess, neither of which is currently listed (under those names, at least) at Cinema Treasures:
“Orange, Tex.— The Liberty and Strand theatres will open very shortly, with a seating capacity of between 1,100 and 1,200 each. The Princess theatre of this city will be located in the New Holland building with double its former seating capacity.”
The same issue of the magazine has another item saying both the Strand and the Liberty were already open:
“Moving picture theatre congestion at Orange, Texas, has been relieved by the opening of the Strand and the Liberty theatres on Front near Sixth street in that city. Before these new play houses opened crowds would stand in line for an hour waiting to get a chance to see a show. The influx of population owing to ship building activity caused these conditions.”
Another item mentions the Airdome Theatre in Orange. Judging from Google’s Street and Satellite views, Orange has almost completely disemboweled itself, so it’s unlikely that any of its old theaters have survived.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Heights Theater on Jul 2, 2014 at 3:26 pm

Ed: I’ve held off submitting the Wadsworth Theatre because I’ve been unable to find any evidence that it operated as a movie house at any time during its brief existence. However, while trying to find such evidence I came across an item in the July 5, 1913, issue of The American Contractor that is probably about the Heights Theatre, which opened October 11, 1913:

“Store, Office & Moving Picture Bldg.: 2 sty. 102x150x100. $75,000. Broadway, 181st st. & Wadsworth av. Archts. Townsend, Steinle & Haskell, 1328 Broadway. Owner Robert E. Westcott estate, 33 Wall st. Bldrs. Fountain & Choate, 110 E. 23d st. Brick, stone. Work in progress. Plastering let to T. A. O'Rourke Co., 103 Park av.”
A couple of Townsend, Steinle & Haskell’s large apartment buildings made it into the AIA Guide to New York City, but the Heights didn’t.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Majestic Theatre on Jul 2, 2014 at 2:52 pm

The Majestic Theatre in Jersey City opened September 16th, 1907, according to the October, 1907, issue of Architects' and Builders' Magazine.

Also, here is JCJohn’s link in clickable form. There is a brief history of the theater and some photos of the restored entrance building.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Heights Theater on Jul 2, 2014 at 2:26 pm

guarina: at 150 Wadsworth, the Heights Theatre building is on the west side of the street.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Italia Theatre on Jul 2, 2014 at 12:54 pm

Philadelphia Architects and Buildings says that the Italia Theatre at 733 Christian Street was the same building as Verdi Hall. P.A.B.’s page for Verdi Hall doesn’t add any information, and PhilaPlace says that Verdi Hall was at 713 Christian Street. Obviously one web site or the other has made a mistake, but I don’t know which one. For what it’s worth, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania lists the “Verdi Hall or Italia Theater, 713 Christian Street, now municipal parking lot.”

Also, the Bella Vista community profile page of South Philly Review mentions “Verdi Hall, 713 Christian St., which opened in 1905, and later became an Italian cinema….”

So there are three possibilities:

  1. (Most likely) Verdi Hall and the Italia Theatre were the same building, at 713 Christian Street;

  2. They were different buildings at 713 and 733 Christian Street;

  3. (Least likely) they were the same theater at 733 Christian Street.

So far the only photo I’ve found is the one at PhilaPlace depicting Verdi Hall about 1906. Until the address issue is cleared up, we can’t be positive whether or not Verdi Hall and the Italia Theatre were the same building. A Sanborn map of the block from the 1920s would resolve the issue, if anybody can come up with one.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Gem Theatre on Jul 1, 2014 at 4:10 pm

This brief item appeared in the July 29, 1916, issue of The Moving Picture World: “Shakopee, Minn.—The Gem theater here is now controlled by Frank Viegel, of St. James, Minn.”

The movie theater section of the 1921 Cahn-Hill guide listed a 250-seat Gem Theatre at Shakopee. The September 3, 1921, issue of Exhibitor’s Trade Review published a letter from L. E. Dawson, manager of the Gem Theatre in Shakopee (right column.)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Italia Theatre on Jul 1, 2014 at 1:57 pm

Philadelphia Architects and Buildings lists an architect named Arthur H. Winters. He was both an architect and a contractor, and was probably the A. Winters who remodeled the Italia Theatre in 1929.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Metro Theatre on Jul 1, 2014 at 3:58 am

Dave Kenney’s Twin Cities Picture Show: A Century of Moviegoing lists a house called the Elite Theatre operating at 2517 27th Avenue S. from 1912 to 1929, and lists the Metro Theatre at 2519 27th Ave. S. from 1931 to 1952. He doesn’t list them as aka’s for each other (he usually does list aka’s), so, if he’s correct, the Elite must have been demolished to make way for the Metro rather than being remodeled to become the Metro. That seems quite an extravagance for economically depressed 1931, though. The roof on the Metro’s auditorium section is of a sort that might have been built in either period, so it offers no clue.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lyndale Theatre on Jul 1, 2014 at 3:55 am

Dave Kenney’s Twin Cities Picture Show: A Century of Moviegoing lists two houses called the Lyndale Theatre: this one, and one at 624 20th Avenue N., which he says operated from 1910 to 1913. I believe that the street name was changed at some point, and the modern address of the first Lyndale Theatre would be 624 W. Broadway Avenue. This site would be a few doors east of N. Lyndale Avenue, so the theater’s name would be plausible.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Elite Theatre on Jul 1, 2014 at 3:21 am

Dave Kenney’s Twin Cities Picture Show: A Century of Moviegoing does list two locations for the Elite Theatre, and one of them is 2934 Lyndale Avenue South. Kenney says that this house operated from 1911 to 1915, but an item in Construction News of December 26, 1914, said that the foundation work for a new theater at 2932 S. Lyndale Avenue had been completed.

The Lyndale Theatre occupies the modern addresses 2932-2934, so if the Elite was on the same site it had been closed and demolished by late 1914. It’s also possible that it was on an adjacent lot and the addresses have drifted a bit over the years. Either way it was gone by 1916, but apparently it did really exist.

Kenney also lists the Elite at 2517 27th Avenue S., operating from 1912 to 1929.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lyndale Theatre on Jun 30, 2014 at 5:36 pm

Also, this theater has not been demolished. It still shows up in Google street view at its correct address of 2932 Lyndale Avenue South.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lyndale Theatre on Jun 30, 2014 at 5:23 pm

The foundation was in for the theater being built at 2932 Lyndale Avenue, according to an item in the December 26, 1914, issue of Construction News. The $31,000 project for the Calhoun Theater Co. had been designed by architect A.L. Garlough.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Beaux Arts Theatre on Jun 30, 2014 at 4:28 pm

So it was definitely at 393 Selby by 1926, and probably before 1917 when it was renamed the Rialto.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about De Luxe Theatre on Jun 30, 2014 at 4:19 pm

The De Luxe Theatre probably went into operation in 1915. A Mr. Graham of the De Luxe Theatre in St. Paul was mentioned in the February 19, 1916, issue of The Moving Picture World.

The issuing of the construction permit for the De Luxe Theatre, located on Maria Avenue between Third and Conway Streets and owned by C. L. Graham, was reported in the October 24, 1914, issue of The Construction News. The architect for the project was F. H. Ellerbe.

The firm Franklin Ellerbe founded at St. Paul in 1909 is, after a few name changes and mergers, still in operation as AECOM.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Blue Mouse Theatre on Jun 30, 2014 at 3:33 pm

A number of American cities had theaters called the Blue Mouse, though the name was most common in the Pacific Northwest, where John Hamrick opened several. I’ve seen speculation that the name originated with a cabaret in Paris, but it is far more likely that all were named for a once-popular play of the name.

Originally written in German by playwrights Engel and Horst, The Blue Mouse was adapted for English-speaking audiences around 1908 by the popular American dramatist Clyde Fitch. Both Fitch and the play (which was considered quite scandalous in its day) are largely forgotten, but there is still a Blue Mouse Theatre in operation at Tacoma, Washington.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Gem Theater on Jun 30, 2014 at 2:25 pm

The Gem Theatre must have been at the northwest corner of Seventh Street and Smith Avenue. Part of a large community center operated by the Salvation Army, which uses the address 401 W. Seventh, now occupies the site of the Gem. The City of St. Paul allows block numbers to change anywhere along a block instead of only at intersections.