Castro Theatre

429 Castro Street,
San Francisco, CA 94114

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Showing 101 - 125 of 145 comments

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on January 22, 2006 at 2:02 pm

Queer queues at the Castro:
View link

cswa913102
cswa913102 on October 24, 2005 at 9:02 pm

I went to just about every Saturday matinee at the Castro from about 1959-1962 or early ‘63. Why the heck not? It was only 20 cents to get in, and another 20 cents for popcorn AND soda. It was usually a double feature with a cartoon. At that time, it was a little run-down, but still impressive. I remember seeing “The Phantom of The Opera” ('62 version, Herbert Lom in maybe his only starring role?) and being a little nervous about that big chandelier.

tjmayerinsf
tjmayerinsf on October 9, 2005 at 5:15 am

If you haven’t already, go to the Castro Theatre website
http://www.thecastrotheatre.com
and click on the History section which has a few old and new photos.

Vito
Vito on October 9, 2005 at 4:59 am

Thanks Tom! What a gem, sure wish we had more like that in NY

tjmayerinsf
tjmayerinsf on October 9, 2005 at 2:20 am

Historic photos can be found at
View link
Click on Digitized Images by Subject, scroll down to Theaters, click on letter C, where there are about 8 historic photos. Not sure if there is an easy way to find current interior photos unless you want to email Bill Longen the programmer at BLCastroTheatre (at) aol.com

Vito
Vito on October 9, 2005 at 2:04 am

Are there any interior photos to be found?

tjmayerinsf
tjmayerinsf on September 8, 2005 at 10:37 pm

All of these comments (above) should also be directed to Bill Longen, the new programmer at BLCastroTheatre (at) aol.com . . go to www.thecastrotheatre.com and click on Contact Us.

stefoscope
stefoscope on September 8, 2005 at 6:18 pm

I would like to add to jackeboy’s comments: I too have noticed the quality of the prints going downhill. I have attended several screenings at the Castro within the last few months, and with each of them was something disappointing about the print and/or presentation. Namely, the 70mm festival. I saw “Tommy” there, which was not only totally faded, and worn, but just a useless, cropped print. It didn’t make any sense for the Castro to show this print, when there are FAR superior 35mm prints out there. I also saw the restored “Vertigo” as part of the festival, and having seen it at the Castro before in 70mm, this print was poorly presented with intermittent focus throughout. They also ran a poor quality, worn old print of “Psycho” earlier last month, which was the worst print I had ever seen of this film. I KNOW there are better prints out there currently. There definitely seems to be a lapse in print quality there, and though I am anticipating the 3-D festival, I am already skeptical. Does the Castro even have a silver screen for this?!

stefoscope
stefoscope on September 8, 2005 at 6:16 pm

I would like to add to jackeboy’s comments: I too have noticed the quality of the prints going downhill. I have attended several screenings at the Castro within the last few months, and with each og them was something disappointing about the print and/or presentation. Namely, the 70mm festival. I saw “Tommy” there, which was not only totally faded, and worn, but just a useless, cropped print. It didn’t make any sense for the Castro to show this print, when there are FAR superior 35mm prints out there. I also saw the restored “Vertigo” as far of the festival, and having seen it at the Castro before in 70mm, this print was poorly presented with intermittent focus throughout. They also ran a poor quality, worn old print of “Psycho” earlier last month, which was the worst print I had ever seen of this film. I KNOW there are better prints out there currently. There definitely seems to be a lapse in print quality there, and though I am anticipating the 3-D festival, and am already skeptical. Does the Castro even have a silver screen for this?!

jackeboy
jackeboy on September 8, 2005 at 5:15 pm

Speaking of Anita, there is one big difference that I have noticed. Since she is no longer the programmer the quality of the prints has gone way down. A few weeks ago I saw Dragonslayer there and the print was awful. This week I saw Ice Station Zebra, and it may have been the worst quality print I have seen at the Catro in the 20 years I have been going there.This is a film that shows often on TV in an excellent print, so I know there are better available prints then the one the Castro showed this week. Anita’s connections used to assure us the best print available. I guess the new programmer does not have these kind of connections

claudew
claudew on September 2, 2005 at 7:04 pm

If anything there have been more gay movies at the Castro since Anita’s firing. Admittedly my tastes are a little more mainstream, but I find myself going to the Castro more since she’s been gone.

Unfortunately Landmark tends to get the best gay independent films and they usually put them at the Lumiere on Polk St. There would have much bigger and livelier audiences if they played the Castro.

VincentParisi
VincentParisi on August 31, 2005 at 4:59 am

A piano is far preferable to some of the bad instrumental accompaniments I’ve heard which seem designed to totally destroy the mood of so many silent films. Especially when you see silents on DVD or TCM. The soundtracks are guaranteed to be abysmal making the films unwatchable.
I wish we had a place like the Castro in New York.

Kiddman
Kiddman on July 23, 2005 at 5:32 pm

They used a PIANO when they have a magificent THEATRE ORGAN (one of the finest, I might add) right there? What the heck are they THINKING???

jackeboy
jackeboy on July 23, 2005 at 2:14 pm

Thank you Gerald, so much for the I before e rule huh?

jackeboy
jackeboy on July 23, 2005 at 2:14 pm

Thank you Gerald, so much for the I before e rule huh?

jackeboy
jackeboy on July 22, 2005 at 6:06 pm

Last week I had the opportunity to see Valentino in THE SHIEK at the Castro with a pianist providing a live score. What a great night at the movies. Even the hipper then thou crowd was captivated by the experience. After a few initial giggles at the unfamiliar acting style, the audience beacame drawn into the story and the experience. Coming up at at the Castro is a week of Harold Lloyd. The Shiek was preceded by Wings, and the Silent Film Festival. Though there may not be enough Silents for everyone’s taste [including mine] the art of the Silent Film is alive at the Castro.

Coate
Coate on July 22, 2005 at 5:15 pm

The Castro is hosting a 70mm festival August 1-11.

Aug. 1 … Vertigo
Aug. 2 … 2001: A Space Odyssey
Aug. 3 … Lawrence Of Arabia
Aug. 4 … The Bridge On The River Kwai
Aug. 5 … Apocalypse Now
Aug. 6 … The Road Warrior
Aug. 7 … Ghostbusters
Aug. 8 … Dragonslayer
Aug. 9 … Tommy
Aug. 10 … Edward Scissorhands
Aug. 11 … Hello, Dolly!

moviesmovies
moviesmovies on July 19, 2005 at 3:42 am

Saw Portuguese films here during a film fest.

gsmurph
gsmurph on May 1, 2005 at 10:42 am

I’m as downhearted about the Castro as most everyone else, but let’s not cut off our nose to spite our (or their) face(s). If someone were to move all the festivals and the former Castro programming elsewhere, the Strand would be a po-o-o-o-or substitute—-how about the New Mission, the Harding, or the former Cine Latino instead? No sense replacing an architectural diamond (which was a big part of the Castro’s appeal with many festivalgoers all these years) with a lump of coal a fraction of the diamond’s size. (Of course, that’s assuming such a thing could be carried out.)

Kiddman
Kiddman on May 1, 2005 at 9:21 am

Just looked at the “coming attractions” at the Castro website. Blech!

Even when I lived in the Bay Area, I rarely went to the Castro for a movie. It was fairly far away from me, and “art” films rarely interest me. VERY occasionally, there’d be a silent movie or organ concert, and THOSE I went to!

The Wurlitzer is wonderful, one of the most beautiful-sounding anywhere. The acoustics in the Castro are TERRIFIC for the organ!

Because I happen to personally know the people involved with that theatre organ, I was lucky enough to be able to make a few early-morning visits for impromptu mini-concerts. Those were truly special experiences that I will never forget.

How come such a wonderful 20’s movie palace as this, equipped with one of the world’s finest theatre organs, so rarely shows silent movies? Even back when I still lived in the Bay Area, silents were almost never shown, averaging maybe twice a year or so.

On those rare occasions, they drew large audiences. My favorite haunt since I moved to Oregon, the Elsinore Theatre in Salem, hosts maybe 20 silent-movie programs a year and THEY tend to draw large audiences, too. I think there’s an audience for this form of movie entertainment, and it’s largely untapped.

I can understand that silents are sometimes hard to acquire, and you have to pay an organist, etc., but come ON! These movie palaces are DESIGNED for the “flickers”! Let’s use them for their intended purposes already! Occasional silents are a great addition to a movie palace’s schedule.

scotch
scotch on January 13, 2005 at 11:59 am

Actually I would like to change my statement on the Roxie… though not quite as impressive as thier calendar days, they are still a significant addition of the SF film landscape.

RobertR
RobertR on January 13, 2005 at 11:41 am

Someone should reopen the Strand and bring back the former Castro programmer and move all the festivals there.