Loew's Jersey Theatre

54 Journal Square,
Jersey City, NJ 07306

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GDellaFa
GDellaFa on May 9, 2011 at 4:47 pm

Three more questions that I’m hoping someone can answer:

Where did the beautiful side table come from? Is it original to the theatre? The side table is on the right side of the lobby just before the right side grand staircase. It’s visible in the above photo.

Also, where did that huge oval table in the lobby promenade come from? Is it original to the theatre.

Are there any other “loose fittings” (furniture, statues, paintings) that are still a part of the Loew’s Jersey? I know there are tons of storage space in the building.

In any case, the two beautiful pieces of furniture are indicative of the level of refinement that could be found in this theatre (and can still be seen with a little thought). Look behind the first 1/32 of an inch of all surfaces and you will see true wonder.

GDellaFa
GDellaFa on May 9, 2011 at 4:36 pm

The marble still exists and is plainly visible in this view:

View link

However, the tarrazzo tile covers this up in the main lobby proper.

I wonder how much of this is there under the tile?…

(Once again I get all dreamy-eyed, and think of what it could look like if this covers the entire lobby. It is most certainly under the candy counter.)

GDellaFa
GDellaFa on May 9, 2011 at 4:29 pm

I think I discovered something that has not been brought up here before. I was recently in the Loew’s Jersey lobby, sitting down next to the candy counter, when I noticed the floor. The is an honest to goodness, real marble floor under the terrazzo tile main lobby floor!!! It is plainly visible behind the counter—beautiful white, black, and red inlaid marble.

Which begs the question, why was it covered up at some point? Was it damaged beyond repair for some reason (marble is relatively soft and might not have held up under the foot traffic) or is it still there, waiting to be restored? Another question, is it just edging around the oval carpet that used to be there or is the entire lobby floor made of marble?! (I wouldn’t put it past anyone one in the 1920s to build a full marble floor to be covered with rug!) Just very curious? Does anyone know?

The tarrazzo looks good. I wouldn’t want to pull that up unless I was absolutely sure about the marble first.

Lastly, it’s nice to see the pelmet back up over the proscenium again — a very nice restoration job!!!

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on April 17, 2011 at 2:01 pm

As Always, All Our Show Are Presented Exclusively From High Resolution 35mm Motion Picture Film With Genuine Carbon Arc Projection, On Our Giant 50 Foot Wide Screen.

Friday April 29th at 8:00pm â€" The Matrix (1999)

Starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Hugo Weaving.
Directed by The Wachowski Brothers. (136 minutes., Rated R)

What if everything that we think is real about our world is instead unreal, a virtual reality created by malevolent, all-powerful computers to fool and enslave humans? This film is a dark, convoluted and action-packed film that was one of the biggest sci-fi titles of its decade. If the ever-more complicated story gets confusing enough at times to make you feel as if you’ve become hopelessly lost in the user’s guide to the latest version of Windows — that’s the point: the film deliberately creates a kind of techno-intoxication to overload and confuse you, break your hold on the ordinary and numb you before completely overwhelming your senses with its special effects. Few films mess with your mind and cause your eyes to pop so far out of your head as “The Matrix.” It is a must to be seen on the Big Screen.

Saturday April 30th at 6:00pm â€" The Thing From Another World (1951)

Starring Kenneth Tobey, Margaret Sheridan, Robert Cornthwaite, James Arness. Produced by Howard Hawks. Directed by Christian Nyby. (87minutes.)

An intelligent script; a fast pace; rapid-fire overlapping dialogue; a tight, controlled atmosphere; a smart and competent female character; and relaxed, natural performances — all are hallmarks of this movie by Howard Hawks. The “thing” itself is seen only in fleeting glances, a directorial decision that built incredible tension while also mostly avoiding the unintentionally funny “man in a rubber suit” scenes that plague so many sci-fi films of the era. The cast is excellent, though none were stars at the time Underlying all is the palpable dread of a lurking, unforgiving enemy that gripped America in the McCarthy era.

Saturday April 30th at 8:10pm â€" John Carpenter’s The Thing (1982)

Starring Kurt Russell, Wilford Brimley, Richard Dysart, Richard Masur, Donald Moffat.
Directed by John Carpenter. (108 minutes., Rated R)

When it was released in 1982, John Carpenter’s “The Thing” was mostly panned as a debasement of the original. But time has lent perspective, and today the film is generally recognized as that most rare of remakes: not a copy, but a successful new adaptation that stems from distinct creative instincts and different sensibilities. The Cold War allusions of the earlier film are gone, and there is much less of an “us vs. it” feeling than an even more paranoid “you can’t trust anyone” mindset. And to top it off, the John Carpenter film is actually truer to the short story that both films were based on. Watching to two films back to back gives one an intriguing look at how two very different film-makers interpreted the same story, giving us two films that are at once the same, yet so different that having seen just one, you will not know the outcome of the other.

Visit The Landmark Loews Jersey web site for details.

RobertR
RobertR on April 10, 2011 at 10:38 am

Would LOVE to see an Elizabeth Taylor tribute here. Raintree County and Cleopatra need to be seen in a theatre to be appreciated.

plenum
plenum on March 15, 2011 at 10:31 am

The video about what Loew’s volunteers do to present a movie has been taken down for additional editing. A post will be made when a new video is ready.

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on March 14, 2011 at 5:21 pm

[size=4][color=red]The Landmark Loews Jersey â€" The Wonder Theatre Of New Jersey[/color][/size]

For the last weekend of March (25th and 26th), The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre located on Journal Square in Jersey City, New Jersey, continues its 10th consecutive year of classic films with three comedy classics to usher in the start of spring.

The theatre is located directly across from the PATH subway station connecting Manhattan with Jersey City, it is also easy to reach from most area highways. Secure discounted parking is located directly behind the theatre. Have your parking ticket validated at the theatre’s boxoffice.

Unlike Some Other Classic Motion Picture Venues, All Our Show Are Presented Exclusively From High Resolution 35mm Motion Picture Film With Genuine Carbon Arc Projection, On Our Giant 50 Foot Wide Screen.

Friday March 25th at 8:00pm â€" The Lady Eve (1941)

Starring Barbara Stanwyck & Henry Fonda.
Directed by Preston Sturges. (93 minutes.)

Always the ironic satirist with a gift for terrific characters, improbably wild scenarios and perfectly tuned dialogue, the great writer/director Preston Sturges had what is, arguably, his most glittering success in The Lady Eve. Without doubt, the film is one of the most sparklingly funny screwball comedies ever made, replete with beguilingly ribald sexual innuendo and such overt overtones about the appeals of dishonesty and criminality it’s a wonder that Sturges got away it all in the face of the puritanical Hollywood Production Code.

Saturday March 26th at 6:00pm â€" Beetlejuice (1988)

Starring Michael Keaton, Geena Davis, Alec Baldwin & Winona Ryder.
Directed by Tim Burton. (92 minutes.)

A deliciously off-the-wall, fast paced comedy-horror, Beetlejuice was Tim Burton’s second feature â€" and it not only defined his signature mix of wild imagination, sweetly fractured characters, surreal sensibility, gothic whimsy and dazzling special effects, but also firmly established him as one of the most original movie makers of our time. Geena Davis and Alec Baldwin are a young married couple who are killed in a car accident but are stuck haunting this world before they can move on to the next. When an obnoxious yuppie couple and their unhappy, Goth-obsessed daughter (played by Catherine O’Hara, Jeffrey Jones and Winona Ryder in her break-out role) move in to their old home, Davis and Baldwin try to frighten them away. But when their fledgling haunting skills prove less than effective, the two turn in desperation to a veteran spook: a yellow-haired, profane and thoroughly gonzo spirit played to over-the-top perfection by Michael Keaton. And that’s when the unique Burton blend of comedy and the macabre really takes off.

Saturday March 26th at 8:20pm â€" A Shot In The Dark (1964)

Starring Peter Sellers, Elke Sommer, Herbert Lom.
Directed by Blake Edwards. (101 minutes.)

A murder has been committed at the palatial Parisian residence of George Sanders. All the evidence points to sexy, wide-eyed housemaid (Elke Sommer). But then the gloriously, monumentally inept Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers) arrives on the scene and sets out to prove her innocence. What follows is an unbroken series of impeccable gags played out at a mad pace.

Visit The Landmark Loews Jersey web site for details.

plenum
plenum on March 13, 2011 at 11:15 am

Hi Everyone,

Two new features on the Loew’s Jersey website.

1) A short video showing the work volunteers perform “behind the scenes” to present movies at the Loew’s, including a rare glimpse at a reel changeover using the classic carbon arc projectors.

View link

2) A Filmography listing of all of the movies Friends of the Loew’s have presented since 2002 through Feb 2011 (it will be updated as new presentations occur)

View link

bolorkay
bolorkay on March 2, 2011 at 3:46 pm

Well, at the risk of seeming somewhat redundant from my previous post last weekend’s “Bogie And Bacall” weekend was the perfect blend of genre and venue. Film Noir (especialy the Warner Bros. variety) always plays very well at the grand old Loews and last weekend was no exception. But, for me at least one of the charcteristics that makes the Loews such an enjoyable (and educational) experience is the fact that the Loews programmers try as often as they can to bring in a guest lecturer after the film to offer insight and perspective into the films just viewed. Case in point, Dr. Foster Hirsch. His knowledge of films and personal anecdotes are infectious to say the least. It’s like attending a master class in film history at NYU. (Can’t wait to read his book, “The Dark Side Of The Screen.”… I believe that’s the title.)

Keep up the great work FOL !

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on February 26, 2011 at 10:42 am

Let us know how it went bolorkay.

bolorkay
bolorkay on February 26, 2011 at 9:27 am

May I ask who usually is in charge of the monthly programming and film selection each month as I’d like to extend a big resounding “thank you” for the terrific “Bogie and Bacall” festival this weekend… whoever you are you sure did hit one out of the park with these films. And what a treat to experience all of the audience reactions to the on screen “banter” between Bogie and Bacall…. that’s what the Loews is all about ! An audience who appreciates the film.
Can’t wait for tonight’s grand finale double feature !

Looking forward to “A Shot In The Dark” in March.

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on February 21, 2011 at 9:12 pm

[size=4][color=red]The Landmark Loews Jersey â€" The Wonder Theatre Of New Jersey[/color][/size]

This coming weekend of February 25th and 26th, The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre located on Journal Square in Jersey City, New Jersey, continues its 10th consecutive year of classic films with three films featuring one of the great couples of cinema, Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall.

The theatre is located directly across from the PATH subway station connecting Manhattan with Jersey City, it is also easy to reach from most area highways. Secure discounted parking is located directly behind the theatre. Have your parking ticket validated at the theatre’s boxoffice.

Unlike Some Other Classic Motion Picture Venues, All Our Show Are Presented Exclusively From High Resolution 35mm Motion Picture Film With Genuine Carbon Arc Projection, On Our Giant 50 Foot Wide Screen.

Friday February 25th at 8:00pm â€" To Have And Have Not (1944)

Starring Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Walter Brennan
Directed by Howard Hawks. (100 Minutes)

This is the movie that brought Bogart and Bacall together â€" both on screen and off. Bogart is the owner of a charter boat in Vichy-controlled Martinique. Approached by Free French activists, Bogart doesn’t want to stick his neck out for them â€" until he finds that doing so will help Bacall. While the screenplay by William Faulkner and Jules Furthman owes as much to Casablanca as to the Hemingway novel they were adapting, it nevertheless is a terrific blend of romance and action leavened with comedy, and Howard Hawks’ direction is, as usual, masterful. But what makes the film truly electric is the unmistakable chemistry that was boiling over for real between Bogart and Bacall as the cameras rolled.

Saturday February 26th at 6:00pm â€" The Big Sleep (1946)

Starring Humphrey Bogart & Lauren Bacall
Directed by Howard Hawks. (114 Minutes)

One of the most popular noir films and most influential detective movies ever made, The Big Sleep nevertheless has one of the most convoluted scripts of any movie made in classic Hollywood. Director Howard Hawks literally blew past red herrings and possible dead ends by letting dialogue and action spill out so fast that there is barely time to acknowledge, never mind contemplate, a new plot twist. But Hawks did slow down to let the audience fully appreciate the erotic innuendo in the repartee between Bogart’s Philip Marlowe and Bacall’s Mrs. Rutledge — performances that were made palpable by the couple’s real-life relationship. This was cutting edge stuff for a Hollywood still under the Production Code. It’s the combination of this razor sharp sexual edge with the disquieting murky mystery that gives the film its distinctly hot yet cold, dream/nightmare feeling.

Saturday February 26th at 8:30pm â€" Dark Passage (1947)

Starring Humphrey Bogart & Lauren Bacall.
Directed by Delmar Davis. (107 Minutes)

A well constructed Film Noir that is one of the most darkly seductive but seldom revived pairings of Bogart & Bacall. Bogart is a man wrongly accused of his wife’s murder who undergoes plastic surgery to conceal his identity. Bacall, more vulnerable here than in other roles, is a lonely heiress who shelters Bogie — and falls for him — while he tries to find his wife’s real killer. The film makes great use not only of its stars' real life chemistry but also of its San Francisco setting. The Bay Area’s hills and winding roads, world-famous bridges and even prison proximity are integral to the story, while the city’s mixture of affluence and squalor, misfits and money men give texture to the shadowy atmosphere. The supporting cast more than hold their own, and Director Delmar Davis makes great use of the tight, efficient script. The opening scenes filmed from Bogart’s perspective are especially effective, adding a distinct, perhaps even Hitchcock-ian feel. Don’t miss this rare chance to see this noir gem on the Big Screen.

Visit The Landmark Loews Jersey web site for details.

[size=1]The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre[/size]

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on January 23, 2011 at 11:46 am

[size=4][color=red]The Landmark Loews Jersey â€" The Wonder Theatre Of New Jersey[/color][/size]

The weekend of January 28th and 29th, The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre located on Journal Square in Jersey City, New Jersey, begins its 10th consecutive year of classic films with a look at those risqué early 1930’s pre-code films.

The theatre is located directly across from the PATH subway station connecting Manhattan with Jersey City, it is also easy to reach from most area highways. Secure discounted parking is located directly behind the theatre. Have your parking ticket validated at the theatre’s boxoffice.

Unlike Some Other Classic Film Venues, All Our Show Are Presented Exclusively From High Resolution 35mm Motion Picture Film, With Genuine Carbon Arc Projection, On Our Giant 50 Foot Wide Screen.

[b]Friday January 28th at 8:00pm Double Feature

  • Freaks (1932)[/b]

Directed by Todd Browning. (65 minutes).

Originally banned in over 30 countries, Freaks used many actual circus freaks as actors. It is the story of love, betrayal, and retribution under the big top.

– She Done Him Wrong (1933)

Starring Mae West, Cary Grant & Noah Beery, Sr.
Directed by Lowell Sherman. (65 Minutes)

Mae West’s first and best film, since it was not watered down by the subsequently production code censors. It is the ultimate distillation of her charismatic persona of simmering seductiveness and innuendo-laced one liners.

Saturday January 29th at 6:30pm â€" Morocco (1930)

Starring Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper & Adolphe Menjou.
Directed by Joseph von Sternberg. (92 Minutes)

Dietrich’s iconic performance in top hat and tails and her scandalously — for the day — kissing another woman created her enduring screen persona of simmering, androgynous eroticism.

Saturday January 29th at 8:30pm â€" Baby Face (1933)

Starring Barbara Stanwyck, George Brent, John Wayne.
Directed by Alfred E. Green. (71 Minutes)

This amazingly frank drama about a woman sleeping her way to the top was one of the films that was most often decried by the advocates of movie censorship.

Visit The Landmark Loews Jersey web site for details.

[size=1]The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre[/size]

YMike
YMike on January 19, 2011 at 8:30 am

There are two versions of “Baby Face”. I wonder if the Jersey will be screening the “wilder” version that the Film Forum screened last year?

bolorkay
bolorkay on January 16, 2011 at 6:35 am

“Baby face” seems interesting… been doing a bit of research on this one.

Will there be any accompanying pre or post discussions from Dr. Hirsch or the editor (sorry, forgot his name!) of “Cinema Retro Magazine”

YMike
YMike on January 13, 2011 at 10:33 am

Great line up of films for the Loew’s “Pre-code” weekend.

Fri. Jan.28. 8:00 PM Double feature of “Freaks” and “She Done Him Wrong”

Sat. Jan.29. 6:30 PM “Morocco"
8:30 PM "Baby Face”

Patsy
Patsy on December 28, 2010 at 6:19 pm

lyndawilsonsmith: Since you don’t have a contact email provided on your profile page, I hope you see this post as I have interest in learning more about your grandfather, Oscar Glas. He did work for the Farman Theatre in Warsaw NY that was later named the Warsaw Cinema and now The Stage listed on CT.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on December 20, 2010 at 12:49 pm

I thoroughly enjoyed the Albert Finney version of “Scrooge” at the Loew’s last week. I even enjoyed it yesterday afternoon on TCM, but that viewing made me even more appreciative to have just seen it 50 feet wide. The Loew’s showing brought me back to 1971 when I first saw it, in a theater with a much smaller screen. Just my own opinion, and no disrespect to Crosby, Kaye and Clooney, but I think “Scrooge” is a much better movie than “White Christmas”.

The organ/vocal concert and sing-along, featuring specially created lyrics with Loew’s Jersey graphics projected on the screen, were wonderful as well. Thanks, Loew’s Jersey staff!

William
William on December 20, 2010 at 12:07 pm

Remember there is only a limited amount of prints of White Christmas available and a limited amount of playdates during this season. A lot of theatres get shut out of playing it, because of the limited amount of prints.

swampdevil
swampdevil on December 20, 2010 at 11:23 am

No judgements passed…just opinion. Spin it however you want, the “Holiday” movies this year were on the weak side.
Moving on now,looking forward to the precode weekend !

Altoblanco
Altoblanco on December 18, 2010 at 8:19 pm

To those criticizing the Holiday Film Weekend choices…best to be informed BEFORE you pass judgment. “White Christmas” has, in fact, already been shown here (where were you for THOSE screenings?). Furthermore, it is refreshing to see a venue such as this taking an unconventional and unbiased approach towards programming – in particular “family-friendly” entertainment – in a time when going to the movies has become a less affordable proposition for many.

There were quite a few young ones (along with their parents) in attendance for “The Muppets Take Manhattan” (277 to be exact) – not bad for a Friday night screening (and better than some other previous Friday night shows). “Scrooge” on Saturday did even better (and musicals – no matter how famous or historically notable – simply do not do as well here as other genres).

Include “value-added” events such as Santa’s visit on Saturday afternoon and the first-ever organ/vocal concert (along with the traditional audience sing-along) before Saturday’s feature…and you have, all in all, another theatre-going experience enjoyed and appreciated by many.

Can’t wait to see what’s in store for January’s “Pre-Code Films” weekend – the original Howard Hughes' “Scarface” (1932), “Baby Face” (1933) with Barbara Stanwyck & John Wayne, and “Morocco” (1930) starring Gary Cooper & Marlene Dietrich are some titles being considered.

YMike
YMike on December 6, 2010 at 10:18 am

I agree. Why not “White Christmas”? That film would have looked super on the big screen.

swampdevil
swampdevil on November 27, 2010 at 8:01 pm

Sinatra weekend was great fun,always a treat to hear Foster Hirsch speak.
The holiday choices (Scrooge the musical and Muppets take manhattan) are disapointing to say the least, almost like they waited until Nov to book the films and thats all that was availible !

mdvoskin
mdvoskin on November 11, 2010 at 4:21 pm

[size=4][color=red]The Landmark Loews Jersey â€" The Wonder Theatre Of New Jersey[/color][/size]

The weekend of November 19th and 20th, The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre located on Journal Square in Jersey City, New Jersey, continues its 9th consecutive year of classic films with a tribute to a local boy who made it big, Frank Sinatra.

The theatre is located directly across from the PATH subway station connecting Manhattan with Jersey City, it is also easy to reach from most area highways. Secure discounted parking is located directly behind the theatre. Have your parking ticket validated at the theatre’s boxoffice.

Unlike Some Other Classic Film Venues, All Our Show Are Presented Exclusively From High Resolution 35mm Motion Picture Film With Genuine Carbon Arc Projection On Our Giant 50 Foot Wide Screen.

Friday November 19th at 8:00pm â€" The Man With The Golden Arm (1955)

Starring Frank Sinatra, Kim Novak, Eleanor Parker, Darren McGavin
Directed by Otto Preminger (B&W, 119 Minutes)

Sinatra is riveting as a two-bit card shark and drug addict trying to go straight in this deep, very dark noir film that features razor sharp characters, great acting, a crisp jazz soundtrack by Elmer Bernstein and a stylish rendering of the post-war hipster milieu. Sinatra’s depiction of the agony of drug withdrawal remains one of the most chilling yet powerful scenes ever filmed. Director Otto Preminger released this groundbreaking drama without the sanction of a Production Code seal, and helped break the stranglehold the censorial Code held over American cinema. This rare big-screen presentation will be shown in a restoration print from the Film Archive of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences.

Saturday November 20th at 6:00pm â€" On The Town (1949)

Starring Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Betty Garret, Anne Miller, Vera-Ellen, Jumes Munshin.
Directed by Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly. (Color, 98 Minutes)

The kind of movie they don’t make anymore — great music, great dancing, fun, romantic, exhilarating. Three sailors go on a whirlwind, 24-hour leave in New York City. Sinatra is great as the one more interested in seeing the sites than chasing girls — but who winds up being chased by one. Dazzling on-location scenes of mid-century New York, including the now iconic “New York, New York” opening. Choreography by Kelly, music and story by Adolph Greene & Betty Comden, score co-written by Leonard Bernstein.

Saturday November 20th at 8:20pm â€" From Here To Eternity (1953)

Starring Burt Lancaster, Montgomery Clift, Deborah Kerr, Frank Sinatra, Donna Reed, Ernest Borgnine.
Directed by Fred Zinnemann. (B&W, 118 minutes).

Extraordinary cast playing complex, engrossing characters, including Sinatra in an Academy-Award wining role that proved his power as a dramatic actor and revitalized his career. The story broke American cinematic ground — and taboos — with its frank depiction of ambitions, frustrations, personal conflicts, deliberate cruelty, sexual desire and adultery on a Honolulu Army base in the languid months leading up to the Pearl Harbor attack. The scene of Lancaster and Kerr in erotic embrace on the beach is legendary.

Visit The Landmark Loews Jersey web site for details.

[size=1]The Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre[/size]

GDellaFa
GDellaFa on November 9, 2010 at 6:44 pm

This is what the Loew’s Jersey is about in large part. In 2010, it is an utterly amazing thing to witness. Note the complete silence of the 1,000+ person audience during the showing. This truly is a Cinema Treasure in the greatest meaning of the term:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLqEzL4Yfrg