Comments from bprince

Showing 8 comments

bprince
bprince commented about Sunrise Cinema 5 on Mar 21, 2014 at 1:11 pm

It was owned by Lancaster Cinema Inc which split into Duerson Theaters and Royal Enterprises Inc.

Duerson Theaters owned the cinemas in Galipolis, Wheelersburg and Lancaster (maybe some in Kentucky?).

Royal Enterprises owned the cinemas in Columbus, Zanesville, Chillicothe and Bellefontaine.

bprince
bprince commented about Lancaster Cinemas on Sep 26, 2010 at 8:06 am

Closed but NOT demolished. Gutted to make way for Dollar General.

bprince
bprince commented about Raintree Cinemas on Jul 30, 2007 at 3:31 pm

Good luck…I hope you find him.

you can email me at

bprince
bprince commented about Raintree Cinemas on Jul 24, 2007 at 2:00 pm

I haven’t had contact with Glenn since 1994. At any rate, I think he was either in Gahanna or Westerville…..

Sorry I am not much help….Maybe you could contact the OSU Alumni Association?

To the good old days of the cinema!

bprince
bprince commented about Lyric Show-Place 1 & 2 on Jul 17, 2007 at 7:05 am

As the only indoor theater in town for decades, this theater was ‘duplexed’ in 1973 to remain competitive with the newly constructed twin cinema on Sheridan Drive.

The Lyric was independantly owned and operated by the Foote family.

bprince
bprince commented about Liberty Theatre on Jul 16, 2007 at 3:42 pm

Are you sure of the name? I don’t recall the Liberty. I do recall the Lyric,at 141 W. Main St. in Lancaster. Could this be the theater you are referring to?

bprince
bprince commented about Raintree Cinemas on Jul 16, 2007 at 3:21 pm

I was the manager here from February 1979 – April 1979 and again from August 1980 til April 1988. I have plenty of pics of the interior and exterior, plus a set of blueprints.

The theater was the second theater built in the Columbus Mero area with stadium seating. The first theater built using stadium seating was The Forum on East Refugee Rd.

The Dolby system was upgraded in 1980’s ( I think it was for the Rolling Stones or the Dark Crystal movie ) that included new Dolby processor cards and also incorporated a the use of a huge subwoofer assembly that sat in front of the screen in the #1 auditorium.

Additionally, the Ballantyne VIP projectors were capable of running 70MM films ( we had purchased several conversion kits to accomplish this ). The soundheads were capable of magnetic soundtracks as well as optical with Dolby encoding. The projection system was setup as a Master/Slave system until 1980 when platter transport systems were installed for all three auditoriums, making it a manager operated booth (eliminating the projectionist position).

The Dolby system was upgraded in 1980’s ( I think it was for the Rolling Stones or the Dark Crystal movie ) that included new Dolby processor cards and also incorporated a the use of a huge subwoofer assembly that sat in front of the screen in the #1 auditorium.

The theater boasted the first ‘private viewing room’. This room was rentable at a reasonable price of $125 and included the cost of the tickets / popcorn and soda for each person up to 12. It was located on the projection booth level of the #1 auditorium & had it’s own private entrance, private restroom, Dolby Surrond system, full wetbar, lighting, privacy glass with curtain and stadium seating with 12 swivel chairs.

The lobby was adorned with enlarged black & white stills (were talking 3' x 5') from The Godfather, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Funny Girl and other ‘classic’ movies. The lobby also had a game area and some funky orange sectional seating, originally on the main floor area of the lobby and later moved to the elevated gaming area.

bprince
bprince commented about Schine Holland Theatre on Sep 23, 2005 at 5:04 am

I have a copy of the original blueprints and some reprints of the opening day ads and local news stories about the Holland. There was actually a parking garage beside the theater that would change your oil and wash your car for 25 cents while you watched the movie or live stage show!

The interior of the upper lobby was solid oak panels. The carpet that was in the aisles in auditorium (at least through 1988) was the original carpet laid in 1931. The basement (yes it has one) also housed a coal storage room for the coal fire boiler as well as several dressing rooms and an elevator / trap door for the stage area. The fly loft above the stage area still housed some canvas handpainted backdrops for the stage shows from the ‘30s. This is truly a gem and I hope the current group can get this building on the National Historic Register if it is not already.