Radio City Music Hall

1260 Avenue of the Americas,
New York, NY 10020

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Showing 226 - 250 of 3,432 comments

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on August 31, 2012 at 6:30 am

The Sixth Avenue “el” did add a certain magic to early photos of RCMH: nypl

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on August 31, 2012 at 5:14 am

Photos at bottom of the page in this February 1939 trade journal show the start of demolition of the Sixth Avenue Elevated Subway structure outside RCMH: Boxoffice

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on August 30, 2012 at 6:47 am

Those sinks and hand dryers are still there.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on August 28, 2012 at 10:29 am

This 1938 washroom at RCMH looks absolutely primitive. I wonder if it still exists with those fixtures? Boxoffice

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on August 27, 2012 at 8:52 am

I just noticed that “THE BLACK CAULDRON” followed “RETURN TO OZ”.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on August 27, 2012 at 6:48 am

I think this engagement of “RETURN TO OZ” in 1985 may have been the last regular movie run at the Hall.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on August 21, 2012 at 10:02 am

Seventy-one years ago today, William Wyler’s film of Lillian Hellman’s stage masterwork, “The Little Foxes,” opened its world premiere engagement at RCMH, with Bette Davis in the pivotal role originally played on Broadway by Tallulah Bankhead. The Samuel Goldwyn production was his first for RKO Radio distribution, after a longtime association with United Artists. Leon Leonidoff’s stage revue, “Follow the Fleet,” saluted the U.S. Navy with spectacular scenes set in Hawaii. Ironically, only months later, a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor would plunge America into WW2.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on July 26, 2012 at 10:08 am

Fifty years ago today, a man plunged three stories to his death from a mezzanine promenade to the floor of the Grand Lobby. The victim was later identified as 30-year-old Roy Ringlund of Asheville, North Carolina, but sketchy news reports didn’t specify whether the tragedy was accidental or suicide. It happened soon after RCMH opened its doors for another day of the record-breaking “A Touch of Mink” and stage revue entitled “Summertime.”

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on July 9, 2012 at 11:17 am

How long did that 70 x 32 foot screen last at the Music Hall?

What are the sizes of some current screens in New York, such as the Ziegfeld, Empire, Lincoln Square?

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on July 9, 2012 at 10:58 am

“America’s Largest Screen” featured in this 1954 two-page trade ad: boxoffice

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on July 9, 2012 at 6:59 am

“Dancing Waters” depicted in this 1953 trade report: boxoffice

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on July 3, 2012 at 4:19 am

A projectionist’s day described in this 1949 trade article: boxofficemagazine

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on June 30, 2012 at 7:06 am

It certainly was. To prove how popular Cinerama was in 1963, I saw it in Montclair, a New Jersey suburb and not a big city by any means. Now there are only three 3-strip Cinerama theaters left in the entire world.

AGRoura
AGRoura on June 30, 2012 at 6:55 am

Well Bill, your first roadshow experience must have been very thrilling, 3 strip Cinerama, wow! It’s a shame we don’t have a Cinerama house in our area.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on June 30, 2012 at 6:27 am

Oh yes, they were all 35mm regular runs at “popular prices” in local New Jersey theaters. I wish I had seen them as roadshows! My first roadshow was “How the West Was Won”, in Cinerama.

AGRoura
AGRoura on June 30, 2012 at 6:18 am

But Bill, Spartacus, Lawrence and the others were two a day roadshow presentations, you had to see them from the beginning starting with the overture and the curtain closed. Are you referring to having seeing them in continuous performances in a move over, usually in 35mm not 70mm, after the roadshow engagement?

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on June 30, 2012 at 5:51 am

Other times (non-Music Hall) when I walked in on the middle of the movie: “Spartacus”, “Lawrence of Arabia”, “Cleopatra”, “My Fair Lady”. It really was a common practice back then. That’s why the “Psycho” restriction was so revolutionary (and effective).

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on June 30, 2012 at 5:15 am

Saps: I’d say the people on those long lines definitely came in the middle. I was on a four-hour line for the 1969 Christmas show, “A Boy Named Charlie Brown”, and we were just glad to finally get in the building. The movie was already playing, but we just found seats and tried to figure out what was going on. I also saw “The Out-of-Towners” at the Hall a few months later under those same circumstances. The line wasn’t as long, but we did walk in while the movie had already been playing for about 45 minutes.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on June 30, 2012 at 4:35 am

Did they come into Radio City in the middle of the show as they did at other movie theaters (“this is where we came in”) in the pre-Psycho days? It must have been mild chaos with all the comings and goings.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on June 29, 2012 at 10:20 am

Waiting lines of 3.5 hours were the norm during the 1945 Christmas holiday show, with “The Bells of St. Mary’s” on screen: boxofficemagazine

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on June 29, 2012 at 5:38 am

Discount coupons for Cirque du Soliel’s current “Zarkana” at RCMH are being handed out daily at busy NYC intersections like Fifth Avenue & 42nd Street. The “Golden Ticket Special” offers “Best Seats” in the orchestra and first mezzanine for $75 each (regularly $120-$130). Sales are subject to availability and limited to 8 tickets per purhaser. Just think: a family of four can attend the 90-minute show for only $300!

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on June 25, 2012 at 10:30 am

Record-breaking lines for MGM’s “The Philadelphia Story”: boxofficemagazine

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on June 22, 2012 at 5:03 am

Here’s a two-page advertising collage of crowd scenes during the opening morning in 1935 of the Astaire-Rogers musical, “Top Hat”: boxofficemagazine

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on June 18, 2012 at 5:15 am

Warner Bros. took a bit of a liberty with this two-page 1950 trade ad: boxofficemagazine

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on June 13, 2012 at 7:26 am

Here’s a 1933 trade ad announcing the opening of “King Kong” at NYC’s two newest show palaces: archive