Radio City Music Hall

1260 6th Avenue,
New York, NY 10020

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Radio City Music Hall

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One of the greatest Art Deco style structures ever built, Radio City Music Hall is one of the most well known landmarks of New York City. Opened on December 27, 1932, with a variety show, it screened its first film Barbara Stanwyck in “The Bitter Tea of General Yen” on January 11, 1933. The proscenium is 100 feet wide, the stage 66 feet deep. It was equipped with a Wurlitzer organ, which has twin 4 manual consoles and 58 ranks. The organ was opened by organists Dick Leibert and Dr. C.A.J. Parmentier.

Showing a mixture of movies and stage shows in the program for 45 years, the format was ended on April 25, 1979 with Kathleen Quinlan in “The Promise”. Thereafter the programming changed to concerts, stage shows and special events.

Reborn after a $70 million renovation in 1999, Radio City has been restored to all of its original opulence.

Recent comments (view all 3,170 comments)

Comfortably Cool
Comfortably Cool on June 2, 2017 at 6:22 pm

RKO never owned the Music Hall, so it had as much right to sell that theatre as it did the Brooklyn Bridge!

vindanpar
vindanpar on June 3, 2017 at 4:40 am

I believe Thrill of It all was the big ‘63 summer movie.
The 3 Bs was the hit Easter show.

Charlie Brown was indeed the ‘69 Christmas movie and while I thought it was pretty bad compared to the TV specials of the 60s it had the best stage saw I saw there. Quite elaborate and spectacular with the finale showing the blast off and landing on the moon of Apollo 11 which had just occured that summer. Great special effects with no computer graphic cheating thank god. Wonderful ending with the stage rising with the image of the flag being planted on the moon with a large frame descending to freeze the image in time. The rest of the cast filled in the stage in front of it for the grand finale. I though all Music Hall stage shows were supposed to be like that. They weren’t.

vindanpar
vindanpar on June 15, 2017 at 12:44 pm

Anybody know what happened to the beautiful 2 ton Cherry Blossom Doncho curtain that was given to the city of New York as a gift and was kept by the Music Hall to occasionally feature in their stage shows? I believe I saw it once in a stage show during the 70s.

moviebuff82
moviebuff82 on June 15, 2017 at 8:25 pm

The Tony Awards were held here this past Sunday and David Chapelle will host an event here…https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=9&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwikz_KGysDUAhXF7D4KHXYqDI4QqUMIRzAI&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cnn.com%2F2017%2F06%2F14%2Fentertainment%2Fdave-chappelle-live-radio-city%2Findex.html&usg=AFQjCNHsjLOl9W9eBfVLF6c3PB05ANI8sw&sig2=9dGrgxvg_6eNsRYWozu9ag

vindanpar
vindanpar on June 23, 2017 at 2:43 am

Comfortably Cool posted the Up the Down Staircase ad from the summer of ‘67.

On the stage was one of the Music Hall’s spectacles unfortunately like all the rest lost forever called Court of Jewels. I had a Kodachrome slide of it once and it looked terrific.

By coincidence it is also the 50th anniversary of Balanchine’s great full length abstract ballet Jewels which is now being celebrated at the New York State Theater.

The summer of love certainly had rock on its mind.

vindanpar
vindanpar on July 7, 2017 at 7:38 pm

CC posted the Robin and Marian ad.

Probably the dreariest Easter show ever. Another what were they thinking film. Not that the Music Hall had much of a choice. Hepburn said, I could have done without the rotten apples at the end.'

Considering the seemingly endless acres of empty seats at every performance audiences could do without the film.

And what was truly astounding was that the stage show was in Black and white! An Easter show in black and white! It’s like everyone at the Hall had it in for the place.

I saw every Glory of Easter I could because it was so beautiful and the only thing that held on to what was great about the theater. When it was revived after the stage and screen show era they must have lost the original lighting charts because the lighting was pretty much lights on lights off. The lighting of the original which they kept through the 70s was gorgeous.

It was also I believe the last Easter show to have the religious icons on the choral stairs.

Would love to know who designed it and what year it was first presented. I think the first Easter show(Cavalcade second run) had a Good Friday tableaux.

Tom06355
Tom06355 on July 21, 2017 at 8:30 pm

I sat in the balcony below the booth and enjoyed What’s Up Doc. The matinee was full and The Whole crowed laughed so hard our side hurt.

moviebuff82
moviebuff82 on July 22, 2017 at 3:14 am

hans zimmer is performing here next week.

hanksykes
hanksykes on July 22, 2017 at 9:01 pm

Hello vindanpar, Don’t know if this will help, but Leon Leonidoff became a senior producer in 1934 so maybe an Easter production was his idea, then of course Roxy also had an Easter pageant in 1933, so who knows?

vindanpar
vindanpar on July 24, 2017 at 11:46 am

I wonder why we don’t have dancing accordionists any more. I bet he alone was worth the 99 cents.

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